FCC Submission For Whistler

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bberns22

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Wondering if any Whistler scanner has been submitted for FCC approval? I searched the FCC application site and found no entries. Figure six to eight weeks for that process and another six to eight, following, to appear on the market.
 
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SCPD

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NADA https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm
select equipment class - CSR Scanning Receiver

There are no applications on file that match the search criteria specified:
Applicant Name: whistler Equipment Class: CSR-Scanning Receiver

There are no applications on file that match the search criteria specified:
Applicant Name: whistler group Equipment Class: CSR-Scanning Receiver

when submitted upto 3 months for approval and another 6 months for 1st production to go out....

look towards end of summer if submitted within next week (<< hint hint)
 
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bberns22

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Looks like late Q3 or Q4 earliest before see anything in market. Curious to see what they come up with for Phase II
 

SCPD

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for instance uniden submitted application for bcd536hp on or before 09/20/2013...
testing was not done on unit till 11/16/2013 - fcc tests & authorization
product not on market till last month 02/2014
tells me it took 5 months for uniden which is already setup as a factory and has the means of building in 3 months from approval date

However whistler being new in the Industry has no previous set ups... drawing board for them... even if patents were purchased the items were NOT.
Therefore they need engineering and programming and final factory prototype and tests before it can even be submitted...
as for the psr-900 it was denied so therefore a few things need to be changes as the psr-900 was emitting a elevated frequency around 812 MHz if I remember correctly... please do not quote the emission as it might have been another frequency

sorry edited I It can be transferred

http://transition.fcc.gov/oet/ea/granteecode_info.html
4. Modify Grantee Code Information

Click Modify Grantee Information under Filing Options at https://apps.fcc.gov/eas/ModifyGrantee.do. This procedure requires the Grantee Code and the Grantee Code Registration Number (GC#). (Reference Item 2)

Three options will be presented:

a. Change Address or Contact Only - The results are immediate for the Change Address or Contact Only option.

b. Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact - The Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact option requires 1) a brief statement explaining the reason for the name change request and 2) a letter containing a more detailed explanation of the reason for the name change; for example, merger; buy-out; etc. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days.

C. Transfer of Control - A Transfer of Control occurs pursuant to Section 2.929(d) of the FCC Rules, which states there must be a merger or sale of company assets in order to transfer the grants of equipment authorization. As defined in Section 2.909 of the FCC Rules, the party responsible for compliance of a particular device is the company (Grantee) to whom the grant of equipment authorization was issued. Section 2.926(c) of the FCC rules requires the assignment of a Grantee Code to that company (Grantee). In the case of a Transfer of Control 1) a brief statement describing the particulars of the transfer must be provided in the text box and 2) a letter containing a detailed explanation of the Transfer of Control including a statement that all (or only some) of the equipment currently authorized to the original Grantee is affected; and a statement that the new Grantee assumes responsibility for the continued compliance of equipment marketed under the original Grantee Code. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days. Questions regarding special circumstances related to Transfer of Control should be directed to www.fcc.gov/labhelp and submitted through the submit inquiry link.
 
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bberns22

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for instance uniden submitted application for bcd536hp on or before 09/20/2013...
testing was not done on unit till 11/16/2013 - fcc tests & authorization
product not on market till last month 02/2014
tells me it took 5 months for uniden which is already setup as a factory and has the means of building in 3 months from approval date

However whistler being new in the Industry has no previous set ups... drawing board for them... even if patents were purchased the items were NOT.
Therefore they need engineering and programming and final factory prototype and tests before it can even be submitted...
They did not receive prior authorizations because those are non transferable per fcc rules....
as for the psr-900 it was denied so therefore a few things need to be changes as the psr-900 was emitting a elevated frequency around 812 MHz if I remember correctly... please do not quote the emission as it might have been another frequency
Yes you are correct
 

SCPD

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Yes you are correct
I was wrong and upon further investigation ...
4. Modify Grantee Code Information

Click Modify Grantee Information under Filing Options at https://apps.fcc.gov/eas/ModifyGrantee.do. This procedure requires the Grantee Code and the Grantee Code Registration Number (GC#). (Reference Item 2)

Three options will be presented:

a. Change Address or Contact Only - The results are immediate for the Change Address or Contact Only option.

b. Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact - The Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact option requires 1) a brief statement explaining the reason for the name change request and 2) a letter containing a more detailed explanation of the reason for the name change; for example, merger; buy-out; etc. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days.

C. Transfer of Control - A Transfer of Control occurs pursuant to Section 2.929(d) of the FCC Rules, which states there must be a merger or sale of company assets in order to transfer the grants of equipment authorization. As defined in Section 2.909 of the FCC Rules, the party responsible for compliance of a particular device is the company (Grantee) to whom the grant of equipment authorization was issued. Section 2.926(c) of the FCC rules requires the assignment of a Grantee Code to that company (Grantee). In the case of a Transfer of Control 1) a brief statement describing the particulars of the transfer must be provided in the text box and 2) a letter containing a detailed explanation of the Transfer of Control including a statement that all (or only some) of the equipment currently authorized to the original Grantee is affected; and a statement that the new Grantee assumes responsibility for the continued compliance of equipment marketed under the original Grantee Code. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days. Questions regarding special circumstances related to Transfer of Control should be directed to www.fcc.gov/labhelp and submitted through the submit inquiry link.


so might only take production time on products that have been authorized
 

bberns22

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I was wrong and upon further investigation ...
4. Modify Grantee Code Information

Click Modify Grantee Information under Filing Options at https://apps.fcc.gov/eas/ModifyGrantee.do. This procedure requires the Grantee Code and the Grantee Code Registration Number (GC#). (Reference Item 2)

Three options will be presented:

a. Change Address or Contact Only - The results are immediate for the Change Address or Contact Only option.

b. Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact - The Change Name, Including Address and/or Contact option requires 1) a brief statement explaining the reason for the name change request and 2) a letter containing a more detailed explanation of the reason for the name change; for example, merger; buy-out; etc. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days.

C. Transfer of Control - A Transfer of Control occurs pursuant to Section 2.929(d) of the FCC Rules, which states there must be a merger or sale of company assets in order to transfer the grants of equipment authorization. As defined in Section 2.909 of the FCC Rules, the party responsible for compliance of a particular device is the company (Grantee) to whom the grant of equipment authorization was issued. Section 2.926(c) of the FCC rules requires the assignment of a Grantee Code to that company (Grantee). In the case of a Transfer of Control 1) a brief statement describing the particulars of the transfer must be provided in the text box and 2) a letter containing a detailed explanation of the Transfer of Control including a statement that all (or only some) of the equipment currently authorized to the original Grantee is affected; and a statement that the new Grantee assumes responsibility for the continued compliance of equipment marketed under the original Grantee Code. Changes requested under this option require review by FCC Laboratory staff and may take up to four business days. Questions regarding special circumstances related to Transfer of Control should be directed to www.fcc.gov/labhelp and submitted through the submit inquiry link.


so might only take production time on products that have been authorized

Will be interesting to see- looks like the models that were in production may happen more quickly then - assuming no changes. Lets 'see what the next few months bring.
 

SCPD

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Will be interesting to see- looks like the models that were in production may happen more quickly then - assuming no changes. Lets 'see what the next few months bring.
Hope they upgrade cpu and dsp on the digital models to do phase 2... might explain the pricetags?
no one will know for sure till they are release...
 

oracavon

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Hope they upgrade cpu and dsp on the digital models to do phase 2... might explain the pricetags?
no one will know for sure till they are release...
The PSR-800 already had phase 2 when it was released, and I believe that the planned PSR-900 (including the working prototypes that a few people acquired) also included phase 2. So I'm sure that Whistler's versions of those models will continue to include phase 2.

However, I wouldn't expect Whistler to spend their limited engineering resources upgrading older models. I think they're more likely to spend their resources trying to remain competitive with Uniden in the market (i.e., designing and producing new models rather than reworking older ones).
 

mikev

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The PSR-800 already had phase 2 when it was released, and I believe that the planned PSR-900 (including the working prototypes that a few people acquired) also included phase 2. So I'm sure that Whistler's versions of those models will continue to include phase 2.
Actually, technically when the 800 first shipped, Phase 2 TDMA was not completed yet. It did have support for X2 TDMA though (Motorola's temporary proprietary solution). Just before GRE closed their doors, a "beta" Phase 2 TDMA update became available, which seems to work very well for Phase 2 decoding. But again, the scanner did not ship with Phase 2 support.

I do however agree that Whistler will likely make minimal to no changes to these in order to get them back on the market.
 

SCPD

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Actually, technically when the 800 first shipped, Phase 2 TDMA was not completed yet. It did have support for X2 TDMA though (Motorola's temporary proprietary solution). Just before GRE closed their doors, a "beta" Phase 2 TDMA update became available, which seems to work very well for Phase 2 decoding. But again, the scanner did not ship with Phase 2 support.

I do however agree that Whistler will likely make minimal to no changes to these in order to get them back on the market.
I was referring to the 2 digital models they are now advertising (197/106)not the 800/900

If whistler were smart and upgraded dsp and cpu with new coding and software vocoder and bam the new 197's would support TDMA
 
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DonS

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However whistler being new in the Industry has no previous set ups... drawing board for them... even if patents were purchased the items were NOT.
Therefore they need engineering and programming and final factory prototype and tests before it can even be submitted...
Reports are that Whistler bought GRE's scanner-related IP. That would include all engineering documents, firmware source code, schematics, PCB layouts, parts lists (including part specifications and sourcing info), mechanical (chassis) drawings, etc. Since Whistler does have access to at least one factory to manufacture their other products, I'd presume such a factory could take that IP and build scanners.

Sure, some engineering might be required so that the factory can "learn" how to make a scanner, but they certainly wouldn't have to go back to the "drawing board" for the GRE scanners that were already in production. About the only thing I'd be concerned about might be the possibility of components that had hit EOL since a particular scanner's introduction; those would need to be replaced, re-specified, re-tested.
 

DonS

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If whistler were smart and upgraded dsp and cpu with new coding and software vocoder and bam the new 197's would support TDMA
The engineering effort required may not be worth the projected sales. New DSP hardware and software, new codec hardware, new CPU hardware and firmware, new vocoder licensing, new schematic, new PCB layouts, etc.
 

SCPD

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Reports are that Whistler bought GRE's scanner-related IP. That would include all engineering documents, firmware source code, schematics, PCB layouts, parts lists (including part specifications and sourcing info), mechanical (chassis) drawings, etc. Since Whistler does have access to at least one factory to manufacture their other products, I'd presume such a factory could take that IP and build scanners.

Sure, some engineering might be required so that the factory can "learn" how to make a scanner, but they certainly wouldn't have to go back to the "drawing board" for the GRE scanners that were already in production. About the only thing I'd be concerned about might be the possibility of components that had hit EOL since a particular scanner's introduction; those would need to be replaced, re-specified, re-tested.
DonS thanks for replying and I just figured why not make the new 197/106 with upgraded cpu and firmware. I know it would mean more coding but perhaps the investment would be well worth the 599.99 pricetag.
Otherwise I find it hard to believe that they will be selling many.
Granted Whistler Group is a known company when it comes to radar detectors but new to the game when it comes to scanner receivers..

Would it even be possible to change the previous CPU DSP to the newer ones that support phase II or would it have to be completely redesigned? Just a thought... don't know if the manufacturing could be as simple as a new cpu/dsp and command set?
Thanks for your time
 

DonS

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Would it even be possible to change the previous CPU DSP to the newer ones that support phase II or would it have to be completely redesigned? Just a thought... don't know if the manufacturing could be as simple as a new cpu/dsp and command set?
To modify the PSR-500 family design to allow TDMA (like the PSR-800/900) would seem "as simple as" a new CPU, DSP, and associated hardware and software. However, that would be pretty expensive, with all of the NRE required. Especially when you compare it to the minimal NRE needed to just release the PSR-500 family as-is - and steer people who need TDMA toward Whistler's version of the PSR-800 or PSR-900.
 

bberns22

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To modify the PSR-500 family design to allow TDMA (like the PSR-800/900) would seem "as simple as" a new CPU, DSP, and associated hardware and software. However, that would be pretty expensive, with all of the NRE required. Especially when you compare it to the minimal NRE needed to just release the PSR-500 family as-is - and steer people who need TDMA toward Whistler's version of the PSR-800 or PSR-900.
Based on FCC requirements I would think they would need to resubmit the device for approval?
 

sjgostovich

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Whistler is smart to not try and re-invent the wheel- rather just put some air in the tire. Many of us end users would like to replace aging GRE equipment and what will be offered initially will fit the bill. From what i've scouted out on the net, various retailers are taking pre-orders on the WS1040 for around $415.00 shipped, so Radio Shack won't be getting any of my money unless they offer a 30% discount out of the gate. With that said, I hope Mr. Starr's WIN500 will work with Whistler's offerings so I continue to scan and be at zen with the universe.
 
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