• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Feedback issues

Status
Not open for further replies.

kyparamedic

Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
146
Location
Central KY
I hope this is the right forum, I wasn't sure where else to put this. I work for two different services, one of which uses an 800 MHz EDACS system and another that uses conventional VHF. On the VHF radios, it seems that if we're even in earshot of another radio on the same channel, we get major feedback. On the EDACS system though, it seems that the other radios have to be turned up really loud or you have to be right next to it to get any feedback. Is this just my imagination or do 800 MHz systems have less feedback issues? Why is this? Also, if there were to be a slight offset or delay in the transmission such as when you're talking on a cellphone and listening to yourself on the other end, would this eliminate feedback or would it still occur?
Thanks.
 

scanfan03

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Messages
1,667
Location
Houston, Texas
kyparamedic said:
I hope this is the right forum, I wasn't sure where else to put this. I work for two different services, one of which uses an 800 MHz EDACS system and another that uses conventional VHF. On the VHF radios, it seems that if we're even in earshot of another radio on the same channel, we get major feedback. On the EDACS system though, it seems that the other radios have to be turned up really loud or you have to be right next to it to get any feedback. Is this just my imagination or do 800 MHz systems have less feedback issues? Why is this? Also, if there were to be a slight offset or delay in the transmission such as when you're talking on a cellphone and listening to yourself on the other end, would this eliminate feedback or would it still occur?
Thanks.
Feedback has nothing to do with the frequency. I think it is just how loud the repeater is on the VHF channel versus the 800 MHz channel. You also have to look at how loud you were talking on each radio. If you put a delay on, it will cause an echo and then feedback (depending on how long the delay was).
 

kyparamedic

Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
146
Location
Central KY
Ok, thanks for the explanation. So the repeater can actually be set for a higher volume? I don't completely understand this but I don't know a whole lot about radios. On the VHF system, just keying up the mic anywhere near other radios causes horrible feedback unless the others are turned down to an almost inaudible level. I've just noticed that there seems to be less feedback issues on 800MHz systems.

Thanks.
 

scanfan03

Member
Joined
Jun 2, 2003
Messages
1,667
Location
Houston, Texas
kyparamedic said:
Ok, thanks for the explanation. So the repeater can actually be set for a higher volume? I don't completely understand this but I don't know a whole lot about radios. On the VHF system, just keying up the mic anywhere near other radios causes horrible feedback unless the others are turned down to an almost inaudible level. I've just noticed that there seems to be less feedback issues on 800MHz systems.

Thanks.
You have to look at how loud you were talking into each radio. Also, in my county (this isn't a rule) the trunked is a lot quieter than the local VFD's conventional, sometimes.
 

kyparamedic

Member
Joined
Aug 23, 2006
Messages
146
Location
Central KY
Is the repeater volume some type of independent setting? I just know that it seems that if another radio is even in earshot when we are transmitting there is awful feedback. Maybe it has to do with the sensitivity of the mics. The police operate off a separate repeater and it seems that they are able to stand pretty close to each other and transmit without problems although sometimes the other officers cover up their mics. Most of them use the same radios that we do however.
 
N

N_Jay

Guest
It also could be that in the EDACS system (or radios) there is some digital audio processing that adds a slight delay, minimizing the chance of feedback.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top