Finding New Federal Frequencies

KI5IRE

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What is the best way to look for new frequencies for federal comms? I've noticed that I never see any licenses for federal entities in the FCC ULS and was wondering what the best way to discover them is? I've seen several P25 and DMR TRS systems for federal in other areas, but never any licenses associated, so it makes me wonder if there are more near me or any digital frequencies that are conventional.

I'm mainly just looking to find and identify new frequencies for the database, I don't really care what the frequencies are
 
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RichardKramer

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What is the best way to look for new frequencies for federal comms? I've noticed that I never see any licenses for federal entities in the FCC ULS and was wondering what the best way to discover them is? I've seen several P25 and DMR TRS systems for federal in other areas, but never any licenses associated, so it makes me wonder if there are more near me or any digital frequencies that are conventional.
Search 162 to 174MHz in 12.5KHz steps; 406 to 420MHz in12.5KHz steps. As a secondary search try 138 to 144MHz, and 148 to 150.8KHz both in 12.5KHz steps. The latter two searches are used by military rather than federal users. Also, in the last two freq ranges there are military aircraft comms in the AM mode spaced at 25KHz intervals. Have fun!

Rich - N3VMY - KAG0096
 

richardbritt

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Also, FYI the FCC has no authority to issue radio licenses to other federal agencies. So you won't find any in the FCC database. I suggest you look in Radioreference for other federal agencies at other state locations and try those at your location. Usually they use the same frequencies at multiple locations. Some don't but they are the exception. Some places have a lot of frequencies and some only one or two. Any particular agency you looking for?

Regards

Richard
 

KI5IRE

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Thank y'all for the responses. I am not really looking for any particular agency, I am just curious to know what all is on the airwaves near me. I have been trying to identify new business systems etc. for the past few months and living in a large metropolitan area like DFW, have a feeling there is much more activity than is in the database.
 

ecps92

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As others have already shared, SEARCH, but don't expect them to be as active as your local PD/FD/EMS or DPW
Feds Come, Feds GO, use in your area may vary base Case, Ops Tempo [they don't take Holidays off for Surv Ops]

Also, adjust the 406-420 to be 400-420 :) And add 380-400 for a search as well

And finally, take plenty of note, dates, times, PL/DPL/NAC, RIDS, locations, and share long after the Operation is over, don't
be so fast to jump and post and active Surv Ops you heard in the CLR.
What is the best way to look for new frequencies for federal comms? I've noticed that I never see any licenses for federal entities in the FCC ULS and was wondering what the best way to discover them is? I've seen several P25 and DMR TRS systems for federal in other areas, but never any licenses associated, so it makes me wonder if there are more near me or any digital frequencies that are conventional.

I'm mainly just looking to find and identify new frequencies for the database, I don't really care what the frequencies are
 

milf

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Add this note: at least half to three quarter of Fed LEA is encrypted full time, so do not get disappointed if all you get is a split second blip and the flash of enc on the screen. You can still lock onto that freq and log the NAC etc... Also of note: It might be busy for a day or two in your area, then be completely dead for a week or longer on some freqs. I know from personal experience monitoring USFS in a few places, that you may only hear the morning Fire WX reports, and a basic assignment roll call. Then nothing until they call end of shift duty. Sometimes you might suddenly hear a fire op pop up, or even a LEO get in a foot chase with an poacher, or find a still.
 

krokus

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Thank y'all for the responses. I am not really looking for any particular agency, I am just curious to know what all is on the airwaves near me. I have been trying to identify new business systems etc. for the past few months and living in a large metropolitan area like DFW, have a feeling there is much more activity than is in the database.
On the whole, federal agencies have much less radio traffic than civilian agencies. (Military Police at larger installations being one of the exceptions, as they will be comparable to a city of similar population.)
 

K4DPA

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Lately, I've been using the RTL SDR dongle with the DSD plus software. This allows me to see a particular range of frequencies on my computer screen and catch radio traffic as is shows up on the waterfall. I find this to be a much easier way to search for radio signals in a large band of frequencies like 162-174 instead of using a scanner. I've found quite a few federal repeaters near my area, which surprised me because it's a very rural area. Most of what I've found has been federal repeaters transmitting the Vote Scan data burst or AES ENC voice traffic. You have to be persistent and dedicated that's for sure. Federal radio traffic is unpredictable and short.
 

dlwtrunked

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Using an SDR is by very far the best way to look for new frequencies. You can see every signal typically in an 8 MHz bandwideth (if ou use an AirSpy SDR and SDRSharp) in any range at your own choosing. Grant it that you have to look at a waterfall display continuously (or screen capture it and review those later--I make them into a movie I can watch much quicker). After you do it that way, using a scanner to find new frequencies seems like a bad joke.
 

Remington12G

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Actually you might be lucky with one agency. The VA in Lexington applied through the FCC for frequencies for Security and Maintenace on DMR UHF. PD uses the 407 band in P25 but everyone else is on the DMR System.. FCC Callsign WQNK927 (VA LEXINGTON)
 

chrismol1

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There's plugins on SDR programs that will scan a section of mhz and save the freq to file for further investigation, anything that transmits within a range will put it on a list. Makes it a breeze to locate anything transmitting within range
 
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