Findlay, OH - Findlay Police to convert radio system to scramble mode Monday

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unixfreak0037

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Does anyone know if they are scrambling everything, or just the car-to-car? Down here in Cincinnati the car-to-car is encrypted, but dispatch is not, so you can still hear what is going on.
 

cousinkix1953

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If the citizenry doesn't like it; let them pass a local ballot measure that restricts this practice to certain investigations or ban encryption altogether. The police chief is still their servant.

Any cop, who really needs his secret business channel has a cellular phone in his car too. Good luck trying to hear these conversations. Few scanners will even tune into the higher frequencies used by many digital systems. The old 800 mhz band is dead air now...
 

PVPD730

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Few scanners will even tune into the higher frequencies used by many digital systems.
Huh? There are plenty of scanners on the market that will monitor P25 digital systems, just not cellular or encrypted transmissions.

The old 800 mhz band is dead air now...
You sure about that? Not sure where you live, but 800 MHz (both analog and digital) is alive and well just about everywhere. Don't believe me? Just search the RR database...you'll be quite surprised.
 

radioscan

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If the citizenry doesn't like it; let them pass a local ballot measure that restricts this practice to certain investigations or ban encryption altogether. The police chief is still their servant.

Any cop, who really needs his secret business channel has a cellular phone in his car too. Good luck trying to hear these conversations. Few scanners will even tune into the higher frequencies used by many digital systems. The old 800 mhz band is dead air now...


You need to qualify your statement by adding that may be true for YOUR immediate surroundings.
Don't make such a broad generalization without backing it up. 800 MHz is in heavy use in many areas, including mine in SW Ohio.
75% of the frequencies in my scanner are 800 MHz, all completely monitorable.
 

radioman2001

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There may be scanners that monitor 800mhz cellular, but individual channels went away years ago. It's now broad band GSM or TDMA, not monitorable! I second the opinion that if you don't like encryption on your local public safety channels, do something and have it put on the ballot box. If I am not mistaken the new Mayor of Stamford,CT had that as part of his election platform. I just hope he doesn't reneg or be bullied into backing down from removing encryption on day to day traffic.
 

kb2vxa

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Well, another one bites the dust.

"If the citizenry doesn't like it; let them pass a local ballot measure that restricts this practice to certain investigations..."
Since when have citizens taken over the powers of the Council?
"...or ban encryption altogether."
That'll never happen since years ago the FCC MANDATED "all transmissions of a sensitive nature" be encrypted. I've said it before and I'll say it again, it's up to law enforcement to determine what is sensitive and what is not, unfortunately the wider choice is ALL transmissions are sensitive.
"The police chief is still their servant."
Pardon me while I pick myself off the floor, the term "public servant" is SUCH a joke!
The only time the public has anything to say is election time and the only thing they can do is hire another "servant" from the available pool usually of one. So what guarantee is there "we won't get fooled again"? Right, "Meet the new boss, same as the old boss."

Pardon me if the crusty old fart side of me rears its ugly head again but the truth of the matter is cynicism comes with age and experience. Most of you are still young and innocent so face it kids, "You ain't seen nothin' yet. N N N N No baby, you ain't seen nothin' yet... you ain't been around!"
 

radioman2001

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Well at least in Conn, and unfortunatly not in New York they have a sunshine law. That makes ALL documentation, radio transmissions, e-mail, etc available to the public at their will and whim. Recently I read somewhere that most of the state agencies and a lot of local government were not even aware of this. So yes you can make a difference, on what you may have access to. Don't belittle efforts to the contrary, you can run for office yourself, and make those changes. Not to take pot shots, but look at New Jersey, the most corrupt state of the union today.I bet they would like to hide behind encryption.
 

brandon

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It's Monday. Can anyone from Findley, Ohio confirm if they switched over to ENC yet?
 

rdale

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radioman - that is not true in Ohio.

brandon - there is a separate thread on today's rollout and so far no ENC.
 

blantonl

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Dwayne, that is good news for you. Hopefully you are breathing a sigh of relief. When I saw this news cross the wire I actually thought of you.
 

Dubbin

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Thanks Lindsay but it wont last as they have already said that they will not start out with encryption but will switch over. Its only a matter of time :(
 

wa8pyr

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That'll never happen since years ago the FCC MANDATED "all transmissions of a sensitive nature" be encrypted. I've said it before and I'll say it again, it's up to law enforcement to determine what is sensitive and what is not, unfortunately the wider choice is ALL transmissions are sensitive.
You need to check your facts. The FCC never mandated that sensitive transmissions be encrypted. Nor did they mandate digital. The only thing that has been mandated is narrowbanding, and that does not have to be digital.

If you believe encryption was mandated, quote the FCC Report and Order which stated same.
 
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