Frequencies and Repeaters

alcahuete

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The rules would seem to contradict that. 47 CFR 95.1761(c) states:
That's actually interesting. Kenwood made quite a few Part 90/95 certified radios, and they can most definitely operate in the ham bands. In fact, I have several sitting right here in front of me. I wonder how they get away with it? The underlined rule does seem pretty clear.
 

MTS2000des

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Yes, but none of the part 90 radios mentioned that were also granted part 95 certification (such as the Kenwood TK-3180, TK-8180, etc) are marketed as amateur transceivers. The fact that they can be programmed there is based upon their designed operational frequency range.
 

bharvey2

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That's actually interesting. Kenwood made quite a few Part 90/95 certified radios, and they can most definitely operate in the ham bands. In fact, I have several sitting right here in front of me. I wonder how they get away with it? The underlined rule does seem pretty clear.

I recall reading about losing part 95 listing if the frequencies can be adjusted externally (e.g. VFO or FPP) but don't remember seeing amateur radio called out specifically. My guess is (and it is my opinion only) that it is the frequency agility that the FCC was concerned about when it was written as was spelled out in the end of that section. Has anyone heard of the FCC acting on this? I'd be curious. Well, I leaned something new.
 
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