• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Frequency vs. amateur channel question

Status
Not open for further replies.

Drake903

Newbie
Joined
Apr 14, 2014
Messages
1
Hello, quick question.

With my current job, we use amateur hand held transceivers (is walkie-talkies) with channels and subchannels. I've been eyeing thev Baofeng UV-5R but I noticed that its frequencies were in wavelengths rather than simple channels (like 1-10, etc). Can the wavelength frequencies still pick up transmissions on these whole-number channels? Or will I need to buy a 2 way radio that transmits and receives only on whole number channels?
 

WA0CBW

Member
Joined
Dec 8, 2011
Messages
1,240
Location
Shawnee Kansas (Kansas City)
Amateur radios transmit on specific frequencies such as 146.520 Mhz or 443.725 MHz. These frequencies are in bands sometimes measured in wavelengths such as the 2-meter or 70 centimeter band. These frequencies can be programmed into specific channels such as 1, 2, 3, or 72 depending on how many channels the radio has. These radios usually have a VFO (variable frequency oscillator) that allows tuning a range of frequencies located in each band. These radios may be able to tune frequencies outside of the Amateur Radio frequency bands such as the Public Safety, Business, or Commercial frequencies. Amateur Radios certified for the Amateur Bands are not legal to be used on any other bands (Public Safety, Business, or Commercial frequencies). If you are using Amateur Radios for your current job be sure they have been certified for the correct service usually Part 90 of the FCC Code of Federal Regulations.
BB
 

robertmac

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jun 6, 2005
Messages
2,151
If there is a need to ask this question, I wonder what the end result of using a CCR will be. If one does not know about transmitters and their possible interference with licensed users, should one be doing this? Crappy Band did use channels as a lot of new users were confused with frequencies. And the channels were consistent with frequencies throughout North Amercia. Similar to how FRS/GMRS are marketted today. Channels really do not exist on Amateur radio as my channel 1 probably is not the same frequency as my neighours channel 1. Channels are just a nice way to place a VFO frequency into so you do not have to search through the VFO frequencies everytime you want to use a particular frequency. By using so called channels, one can scan the frequencies you want much easier than scan the entire band via VFO frequency. Now, the CCR as I have said before make very lousy scanners whether you are talking memory scan [memory is used instead of channel vocabulary] or VFO scan.
 

elk2370bruce

Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
2,052
Location
East Brunswick, NJ
Hello, quick question.

With my current job, we use amateur hand held transceivers (is walkie-talkies) with channels and subchannels. I've been eyeing thev Baofeng UV-5R but I noticed that its frequencies were in wavelengths rather than simple channels (like 1-10, etc). Can the wavelength frequencies still pick up transmissions on these whole-number channels? Or will I need to buy a 2 way radio that transmits and receives only on whole number channels?
Is this a fact that you're using amateur equipment or just a WAG? (I think the latter is true) Amateur radios do not operate, nor do they display channel numbers (whole of otherwise) GMRS, MURS, or FRS radios are the more likely utilization. It sounds like you don't have a clue or have even begun a realistic (albiet minimal) understanding of radios. In any event, don't buy any radio until you have some real understanding than you currentl;y possess or you'll waste your money and possibly get you in some unpleasant discussions with government officials. Besides, under the FCC, amateur radio is NOT used for business or commercial purposes.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top