FRS Radios Launch a Search

Status
Not open for further replies.

jimmnn

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Messages
14,368
Location
Colorado
SAGUACHE COUNTY - Weather and rough terrain are posing big problems for rescue crews trying to reach a mountaineer who plummeted nearly 200 feet in the Sangre de Cristo Mountain range.

Saguache County Sheriff's Spokesperson Mark Werts said lightning is slowing down the search and rescue team from reaching the extremely remote area where the climber fell over a cliff on the Southeast face of the Pico Asilado Mountain.

Around 1:30 p.m. Sunday, Werts said a man nearly 25 miles away in Alamosa heard the group of three climbers call for help. Werts said what's amazing is the man was using a small family walkie-talkie which you can find in any discount store.

"Those walkie-talkies are supposed to have a direct site range of just a couple of miles and it actually went about 20-some-to-25 miles," Werts said. "It's pretty incredible that they even reached that."

Because of the difficulties reaching the victim, rescuers do not know the status of the climber. Seven rescuers were making their way carefully through the weather Sunday night, but another group was scheduled to begin a more extensive attempt starting at 5 a.m. Monday.
 
M

mpg0515

Guest
Why is it such a big deal that an FRS radio was able to communicate 20-25 miles? Yes, they are only a 1/2 watt radios, but what is key here is line of site comms.... When I climb Horsetooth Mountain a couple of times a year I can talk on 70cm a hundred miles with basically the same setup...
 

jimmnn

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 11, 2002
Messages
14,368
Location
Colorado
mpg0515 said:
Why is it such a big deal that an FRS radio was able to communicate 20-25 miles? Yes, they are only a 1/2 watt radios, but what is key here is line of site comms.... When I climb Horsetooth Mountain a couple of times a year I can talk on 70cm a hundred miles with basically the same setup...
Found the 58 y/o guys body today anyway after fallening 200 feet.

Jim<
 

firescannerbob

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2004
Messages
1,338
Location
Colorado
mpg0515 said:
Why is it such a big deal that an FRS radio was able to communicate 20-25 miles? Yes, they are only a 1/2 watt radios, but what is key here is line of site comms.... When I climb Horsetooth Mountain a couple of times a year I can talk on 70cm a hundred miles with basically the same setup...
Maybe its beacuse they ARE only 1/2 watt radios, and they're advertised to only make it a few miles, and rarely even do that (under normal use)...
I think that a FRS radio that was heard 25 miles away is pretty remarkable, espeically considering that there was even someone to hear it on the other end.
 
M

mpg0515

Guest
firescannerbob said:
Maybe its beacuse they ARE only 1/2 watt radios, and they're advertised to only make it a few miles, and rarely even do that (under normal use)...
I think that a FRS radio that was heard 25 miles away is pretty remarkable, espeically considering that there was even someone to hear it on the other end.
If you are on top of a mountain though..... This is basic VHF/UHF line of site communications. I am able to talk to a friend in Willard, CO (about 100+ miles east of Fort Collins) w/ a 1/2 watt on 446.500. This is again of course on Horsetooth Mountain. Rule of thumb, line of site, you can talk. Take a FRS radio up on a hill sometime, you can hear people all over the place. It seems like just about everyone owns a pair or more of these radios. They can be very useful, especially for emergencies, along the front range due to all the hills and mountain tops that we have.

I am sorry to hear that the guy did not make it.
 

firescannerbob

Member
Feed Provider
Joined
Dec 5, 2004
Messages
1,338
Location
Colorado
mpg0515 said:
If you are on top of a mountain though..... This is basic VHF/UHF line of site communications. I am able to talk to a friend in Willard, CO (about 100+ miles east of Fort Collins) w/ a 1/2 watt on 446.500. This is again of course on Horsetooth Mountain. Rule of thumb, line of site, you can talk. Take a FRS radio up on a hill sometime, you can hear people all over the place. It seems like just about everyone owns a pair or more of these radios. They can be very useful, especially for emergencies, along the front range due to all the hills and mountain tops that we have.
You're missing the point...the article wasn't written by a ham or for a ham magazine. It was written by a journaiist for mainstream release. These radios are not advertised (or intended) for communications over those distances. Just because you and I know it is possible, doesn't mean that every Tom, Dick and Harry who buys one knows that. For that writer and for that type of publication, it IS a big deal. Geez...

BTW, what kind of antenna are you using when you talk over those distances? Is it the same cheapo antenna that comes with most FRS radios? I think not...
 
Last edited:
M

mpg0515

Guest
firescannerbob said:
You're missing the point...the article wasn't written by a ham or for a ham magazine. It was written by a journaiist for mainstream release. These radios are not advertised (or intended) for communications over those distances. Just because you and I know it is possible, doesn't mean that every Tom, Dick and Harry who buys one knows that. For that writer and for that type of publication, it IS a big deal. Geez...
I understand your point, but I think that journalists should do more research. They were making it sound like this was a miracle. There are instances (emergencies) all around the nation, even the world, that are based on long range FRS calls everyday of the week. I did not mean to make it sound like you were wrong, I was just trying to clear up that it is not as big as the media makes it sound.

The antenna that I use is the antenna that came with the radio (rubber duck) and yes it is possible. I do it atleast a couple of times a year and even more when I climb 14'ers.
 
Last edited:
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top