General exam question

Spankymedic7

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Mar 30, 2007
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I am in the process of studying for the general class license. The only question I have so far is how in depth do I need to know about the various general license bands? I've seen multiple band plans which go from the basics (band edges), to complete dissection of the respective band (band edges for each sub-band, the various modes allowed in each sub-band, etc...)

So my question is...how deep do I go?


Thanks in advance!
 

mass-man

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Parker Co., TX
I would find a couple of sample tests and determine how in depth they go....
Here's an example:
On which of the following bands is a General Class license holder granted all amateur frequency privileges?
  • 160, 30, 17, 15, 12, and 10 meters
  • 160, 60, 30, 17, 12, and 10 meters
  • 160, 80, 40, and 10 meters
  • 60, 20, 17, and 12 meters
 

n5ims

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Now once you upgrade, be sure to have a current band plan handy so you don't accidently move outside your privileges. Although you should know them, it's easy to tune outside your range when looking for someone to QSO with or chasing DX. Having the band plan posted right by your radio makes it easier to check when tuning around the bands.
 

TexTAC

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I had the same issues when studying for the General. I’d recommend learning the basic exceptions to the bands:
  • 60 meters is 5 discrete frequencies, not really a band
  • 1.5 kW PEP is max power except on 30 meters which is 200 W PEP (and RTTY and data only) and 60 meters which is 100 W PEP
  • The bands Generals don’t have full access to are 80, 40, 20, and 15 so memorize the frequency ranges for those bands

 

Spankymedic7

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Wisconsin
I had the same issues when studying for the General. I’d recommend learning the basic exceptions to the bands:
  • 60 meters is 5 discrete frequencies, not really a band
  • 1.5 kW PEP is max power except on 30 meters which is 200 W PEP (and RTTY and data only) and 60 meters which is 100 W PEP
  • The bands Generals don’t have full access to are 80, 40, 20, and 15 so memorize the frequency ranges for those bands
Nice info, thank you for helping me out!
 

Spankymedic7

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Wisconsin
Now once you upgrade, be sure to have a current band plan handy so you don't accidently move outside your privileges. Although you should know them, it's easy to tune outside your range when looking for someone to QSO with or chasing DX. Having the band plan posted right by your radio makes it easier to check when tuning around the bands.
That's a great idea, I actually planned on doing that, as it would be my luck I get too close to a band edge and wind up tx'ing out of band. Thanks for the heads up!
 

Spankymedic7

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Joined
Mar 30, 2007
Messages
308
Location
Wisconsin
I would find a couple of sample tests and determine how in depth they go....
Here's an example:
On which of the following bands is a General Class license holder granted all amateur frequency privileges?
  • 160, 30, 17, 15, 12, and 10 meters
  • 160, 60, 30, 17, 12, and 10 meters
  • 160, 80, 40, and 10 meters
  • 60, 20, 17, and 12 meters
I've been going through the ARRL General License Manual and doing HamRadioPrep. Hopefully between the two I'll be good to go, thanks for your help!
 

alcahuete

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Antelope Acres, California
I never thought of that...thanks for the info!
You're welcome! Learn and know the material. Memorizing is not going to teach you anything, of course, and it sounds like you are going about this the right way. But of course, the ham radio exams are some of the few exams in the world where you can see the questions and answers word-for-word before you take the test. It makes it really nice for seeing exactly what is going to be asked of you.
 
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