General Fire/EMS questions

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cstockmyer

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BoxAlarm187 said:
Yes, you're correct, just as the the new controversy about FireACT grants (reportedly) not being given to fire departments that don't have CBRN compliant SCBA.

NFPA is such a great thing and a demon at the same time.

As for who uses the PASS devices, they're generally only used when the SCBA (self contained breathing apparatus) is being used, which forest fighters don't.
How are they not needed? I know they wear those bright yellow shirts and all, but it seems just as dangerous with the terrain and all.
 

BoxAlarm187

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Wildland (forest) firefighting is a different beast than structural firefighting. The biggest difference is the visibility ... the wildland guys generally operate outside, where even at night, the visibilty is far better than inside a house fire at ANY time.

The wildland guys are also operating in much larger groups, where assistance is very close by within a group.

I'm certainly not an expert on wildland firefighting, perhaps some of my "out west" brothers can shed some light on this for us.
 

firescannerbob

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eyes00only said:
Confusing for an old fart. I always thought the acronym PASS was Pull / Aim / Squeeze / Sweep :(

Jerry
That is correct if you're using a fire extinguisher.
Otherwise it's Personal Alarm Safety System

As for why wildland firefighters don't wear PASS's and structural firefighters do...

The biggest threat to a structural firefighter is depletion of his SCBA air supply, which usually occurs when a firefighter is trapped in a building. It's easy for a firefighter to become separated from the rest of his company, and in dark, oxygen depleted, toxic gase filled, unfamiliar surroundings (which may have just collapsed around them) it is virtually impossible to locate someone. That is where the PASS comes in. It goes off and gives other firefighters an audible signal to follow to the downed firefighter.
All of those conditions are generally not present in wildland firefighting. That is why wildland firefighters don't wear SCBA's and don't need PASS's.
 

cstockmyer

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firescannerbob said:
That is correct if you're using a fire extinguisher.
Otherwise it's Personal Alarm Safety System

As for why wildland firefighters don't wear PASS's and structural firefighters do...

The biggest threat to a structural firefighter is depletion of his SCBA air supply, which usually occurs when a firefighter is trapped in a building. It's easy for a firefighter to become separated from the rest of his company, and in dark, oxygen depleted, toxic gase filled, unfamiliar surroundings (which may have just collapsed around them) it is virtually impossible to locate someone. That is where the PASS comes in. It goes off and gives other firefighters an audible signal to follow to the downed firefighter.
All of those conditions are generally not present in wildland firefighting. That is why wildland firefighters don't wear SCBA's and don't need PASS's.
Ok that makes sence. Thanks
 

cstockmyer

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How many firefighters and Paramedics loose their lives in the line of duty? Is it more or less then Law Enforcement.
 

firescannerbob

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cstockmyer said:
How many firefighters and Paramedics loose their lives in the line of duty? Is it more or less then Law Enforcement.
Around 110 firefighters each year +/- a few (9/11 being an obvious exception where 343 FDNY were killed). EMS workers may be a little harder to determine. Some of the firefighter deaths are also EMTs/Paramedics, further confusing things.
I believe police officer LODD's are about the same as firefighters each year.
 

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firescannerbob said:
Around 110 firefighters each year +/- a few (9/11 being an obvious exception where 343 FDNY were killed). EMS workers may be a little harder to determine. Some of the firefighter deaths are also EMTs/Paramedics, further confusing things.
I believe police officer LODD's are about the same as firefighters each year.
But remember most LODD's are related to coronary artery disease (CAD).

A new government study has found that sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death in the line of duty for both volunteer and career firefighters.

Jim<
 

firescannerbob

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jimmnn said:
But remember most LODD's are related to coronary artery disease (CAD).

A new government study has found that sudden cardiac death is the leading cause of death in the line of duty for both volunteer and career firefighters.

Jim<
And a previous one found that most were related to MVA's, especially for volunteers in thier private vehicles. I don't believe that the sudden cardiac death is directly related to coronary artery disease, although both are certainly issues. Very healthy FF's have had cardiac arrests without corresponding CAD.
 

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cstockmyer said:
Is there a National Fire fighters memorial? Like the Law Enforcement one?

Yes there is and for some reason im thinking its in Colorado Springs but im NOT sure about that
 

cstockmyer

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I have not gone a ride along for a long long time w/ DPD. When I did the officer when in the car took her pacset and put it into the radio in the car, basically making her pacset the her patrol car radio...does that make sense? Do the Denver fire radios work the same way?
 

cstockmyer

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chris_a_rodgers said:
The International Association of Fire Fighters (IAFF) Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial is located in Colorado springs.
Wow that must be a very powerful place to visit, I'll have to go sometime.
 

firescannerbob

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cstockmyer said:
Wow that must be a very powerful place to visit, I'll have to go sometime.
The IAFF Fallen Firefighters Memorial is indeed in Colorado Springs, in Memorial Park on Pikes Peak Ave. The annual Fallen Firefighters Memorial Ceremony will be September 16th, and as always, the public is encouraged to attend. If you haven't been to one of these (I go to every one of them) you're missing a pretty powerful event.

There is also a National Fallen Firefighters Memorial on the grounds of the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, MD. It honors all fallen firefighters, not just those who are members of the IAFF.
 

cstockmyer

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firescannerbob said:
The IAFF Fallen Firefighters Memorial is indeed in Colorado Springs, in Memorial Park on Pikes Peak Ave. The annual Fallen Firefighters Memorial Ceremony will be September 16th, and as always, the public is encouraged to attend. If you haven't been to one of these (I go to every one of them) you're missing a pretty powerful event.

There is also a National Fallen Firefighters Memorial on the grounds of the National Fire Academy in Emmitsburg, MD. It honors all fallen firefighters, not just those who are members of the IAFF.
How many of the 9/11 Fire fighters are on the memorial in the springs?
 

cstockmyer

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Is there such thing as a Fire Department helicopter? Like DPD has air one..does or has anyone had a fire helicopter?
 

jimmnn

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cstockmyer said:
Is there such thing as a Fire Department helicopter? Like DPD has air one..does or has anyone had a fire helicopter?
Yes check out Los Angeles County.

Jim<
 
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