Getting into photography

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JokeInsurance

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I've always felt that it would be nice just to have a camera on hand to capture anything interesting so you could use it to tell someone how your day was and obviously to remember the moment. Now, I am not looking to be one of those amateurs with the camera claiming to be a master in photography but just use it a hobby/for fun. Anyways, my point of this message is this; for someone in my shoes, what type of camera would you recommend that I check out? I'd appreciate any help that you can give me. Thanks.
 

N4CYA

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Depends on your budget spending out for the DSLR camera the price ranges out from $500 all the way up to $7000 give or take for the higher end professional DSLR cameras. I'm just a everyday person who's not a professional photograph taker I use a Nikon D5100 16.2 mega pixel DSLR camera it takes great pictures I'm happy with it. I also use a Nikkor 18-55mm VR lens with a Hoya 52mm Pro1 digital UV lens and a Nikkor HB-45 camera lens hood. Here's some of my photo's I took with my camera.



 

JokeInsurance

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I'm just a everyday person who's not a professional photograph taker I use a Nikon D5100 16.2 mega pixel DSLR camera it takes great pictures I'm happy with it. I also use a Nikkor 18-55mm VR lens with a Hoya 52mm Pro1 digital UV lens and a Nikkor HB-45 camera lens hood.
That is exactly where I stand as well. Maybe I should check those two brands out? How do you feel about digital cameras?

And great photos, btw!
 

N4CYA

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That is exactly where I stand as well. Maybe I should check those two brands out? How do you feel about digital cameras?

And great photos, btw!
All depends on what you want in a camera and how you are going to use it for photographs. You have choices of Nikon & Canon unless you want a digital camera like the Nikon Coolpix or the Canon digital cameras. For me I did comparisons between the Nikon vs. Canon I choose the Nikon DSLR camera what I am using now I love it takes beautiful pictures. I thank you for the great pictures I took my time looking for that great shot and I took it. Also check out YouTube, for professional photograph takers to see what their opinions are for the best camera.

- Jamie
 

eagleswings01

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There is an absolute abundance of cameras on the market today, all of which are competing for your money. I have owned well over $20K worth of photographic equipment, and the old rule still stands...the best camera is the one that you will use.

Quite honestly, I now use what would be considered a basic DSLR - a Nikon D3100 with two kit zoom lenses. You are welcome to look at my links below for photographs here on RR or on Flickr that have been taken with that camera. I purchased it from Costco for $750 out the door.

Digital vs. film...ahh this topic never gets old to me! I absolutely love film. Over the years (up until last year) I have used a Hasselblad, a Leica, a Mamiya 645, a Yashica-Mat 124G, a Mamiya C330, and way too many others to list (including a Holga). There is something very special about the look of film. But, and it's a big but, it is extremely expensive to use in today's world. I know there are many people who say you can still get 35mm developed at a local drug store or photo lab, but in many cases the results leave much to be desired. A good lab charges a decent amount of money, and so they should. Digital is far from perfect, but it is here to stay. It has many wonderful advantages and will give back and much as you are willing to invest in to it with proper understanding and knowledge.

I approach photography now in a truly hobbyist form. It's good to know all the rules, ratios, etc...but I take pictures now just for fun. If you have any other questions at all I am happy to help, as are many others here.

Good luck!
Mike
 
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John_S

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That's a tough question and...

Depends on a few things. When people ask me this stuff, my first question is to figure how much you can spend. The next question deals with how involved you think that you will get. If you're going to do basic stuff for a while, there's no shame in starting off with an advanced point and shoot like the Canon G12. These are a good starting point because the price/feature ratio is very good and they take good pictures...got one myself... and they have a lot of the same features that the bigger cameras have. The price should drop on these during the spring because of an upgrade to the G line that's coming. From this starting spot, you'll get an idea where and how you would like to upgrade,and in the meantime, with all the options on the G12, you'll be able to try stuff. In the end, you'll have a better idea of what you want in a bigger camera when it comes time to upgrade. So my recommendation is to not get the big fancy DSLR till you have a better idea of where you're going. And I'll be willing to bet that you'll keep the G12, even after getting the bigger camera, because it's a great travel camera and is much easier to carry than a DSLR. The other advanced point and shoot I would say to take a look at is the Fuji X-10...very nice piece of gear with a good price. Don't jump into this or you'll spend money on stuff you may not need or use.
 

JokeInsurance

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Depends on a few things. When people ask me this stuff, my first question is to figure how much you can spend. The next question deals with how involved you think that you will get. If you're going to do basic stuff for a while, there's no shame in starting off with an advanced point and shoot like the Canon G12. These are a good starting point because the price/feature ratio is very good and they take good pictures...got one myself... and they have a lot of the same features that the bigger cameras have. The price should drop on these during the spring because of an upgrade to the G line that's coming. From this starting spot, you'll get an idea where and how you would like to upgrade,and in the meantime, with all the options on the G12, you'll be able to try stuff. In the end, you'll have a better idea of what you want in a bigger camera when it comes time to upgrade. So my recommendation is to not get the big fancy DSLR till you have a better idea of where you're going. And I'll be willing to bet that you'll keep the G12, even after getting the bigger camera, because it's a great travel camera and is much easier to carry than a DSLR. The other advanced point and shoot I would say to take a look at is the Fuji X-10...very nice piece of gear with a good price. Don't jump into this or you'll spend money on stuff you may not need or use.
I definitely would like to start off with the basic stuff then gradually move up. I'd just like to have a camera on me at that moment and take a photo. Using a everyday camera for situations such as that. I know that sounds broad, but that is what I am looking for.

Or in my case, do you think a digital camera might be a better bet?

Thanks again!
 

John_S

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There's no doubt...

Digital offers more capability than film...no contest. And it's cheaper and easier to deal with once you get the experience with post processing. No worries about running out of film or dealing with changing film speeds on the fly. So many advantages. The trick is to find a good camera to start off and learn with. I seriously could recommend the G12 for this because it has a lot of the features that the bigger cameras have, so you can take what you learn and apply it further down the road. It also takes excellent pictures, so you don't feel like you're starting out with something that's toyish. The thing with buying a DSLR is that the lower price point cameras usually compromise on the quality of the lens that comes in the kit. Which means having to do some research and usually some trial and error finding the right lens that will show off the image quality that the camera body is capable of. Not an issue with the G12...it's fixed lens and is very good. It's a good learner's camera.
 

nmelfi

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Digital offers more capability than film...no contest. And it's cheaper and easier to deal with once you get the experience with post processing. No worries about running out of film or dealing with changing film speeds on the fly. So many advantages. The trick is to find a good camera to start off and learn with. I seriously could recommend the G12 for this because it has a lot of the features that the bigger cameras have, so you can take what you learn and apply it further down the road. It also takes excellent pictures, so you don't feel like you're starting out with something that's toyish. The thing with buying a DSLR is that the lower price point cameras usually compromise on the quality of the lens that comes in the kit. Which means having to do some research and usually some trial and error finding the right lens that will show off the image quality that the camera body is capable of. Not an issue with the G12...it's fixed lens and is very good. It's a good learner's camera.
I will agree with John S. I have a Canon G9 [old school by today's standards] and want a DSLR but I have not found a reason to spend the money on one because the G9 does everthing I want it to and takes great pictures.Start off slow with a advanced point and shoot like the G series and you might not want to go any further.
 
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