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GMRS Technical Rules

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wuzafuzz

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Can anyone provide a reference to the technical rules affecting GMRS? I found Part 95.129 in the GMRS rules, that says equipment must comply with technical rules in Part 95.

Specifically I'm looking for info on wide vs narrow band, and whether GMRS required to go narrowband in a few years.

I'm a fairly new licensee and want to ensure I'm following the rules, and purchase equipment that is future proof (at least in the near term).

Thanks in advance!
 

bezking

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GMRS will not be going narrowband. That rule is only applicable to private LMR licensees.
 
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N_Jay

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Narrowbanding affects Part 90 rules.
Since GMRS is Part 95, it is unaffected by the current changes, but that does not mean that the FCC won't think something else up.

Someone let me know, if I have missed something about narrowbanding in Part 95. (I don't watch the FCC on a daily basis.)
 

SkipSanders

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§ 95.637 Modulation standards.
(a) A GMRS transmitter that transmits emission types F1D, G1D, or G3E must not exceed a peak frequency deviation of plus or minus 5 kHz. A GMRS transmitter that transmits emission type F3E must not exceed a peak frequency deviation of plus or minus 5 kHz. A FRS unit that transmits emission type F3E must not exceed a peak frequency deviation of plus or minus 2.5 kHz, and the audio frequency response
must not exceed 3.125 kHz .

Most recently published Part 95: (Revised October 1, 2008)

2008 CFR Title 47, Volume 5

Part 95 for October 2009 has not yet been placed on the website.
 

N4DES

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Narrowbanding affects Part 90 rules.
Since GMRS is Part 95, it is unaffected by the current changes, but that does not mean that the FCC won't think something else up.

Someone let me know, if I have missed something about narrowbanding in Part 95. (I don't watch the FCC on a daily basis.)

You didn't miss anything and yes that is correct, but there is nothing to say that someone looking to operate GMRS can't do so in narrowband so they aren't bothered by the adjacent channel FRS users.
 

talkpair

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You didn't miss anything and yes that is correct, but there is nothing to say that someone looking to operate GMRS can't do so in narrowband so they aren't bothered by the adjacent channel FRS users.
i would agree........just because you are authorized 20KHz doesn't mean you need to utilize all of it.

Eventually, GMRS users desiring NEW mobile radios or repeaters will probably be forced into narrowband, not by an FCC mandate, but by the lack of availability of new wideband commercial gear that's widely used today.

The FCC has prohibited the manufacture or importation of new 25 KHz equipment after Jan 1, 2011, so it would seem unlikely that anyone will manufacture a 20 KHz mobile radio or repeater specifically for GMRS use, since other UHF services will be mandated to 12.5 KHz.

This probably won't affect those using portable equipment as much, since blister-packed GMRS gear is currently, and most likely will continue to be available.
 

Cowthief

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Gmrs

Hello.

So far the sheer quantity of good used commercial equipment that is cheap will provide a supply of GMRS radios for quite some time.
Although something like an HT-220 or MT-500 can be put on GMRS the cost of channel elements or crystals make this impractical.
Likewise later Motorola radios require Radio Service Software and a Radio Interface Box and cable and the correct type of computer and Operating System, not exactly easy or cheap.
But there is a lot of really cheap equipment out there that may make it worth while.
Pretty much everyone else can provide the needed parts to program without a problem.
In fact most other manufacturers radios can be programmed by just a jumper or diode.
There are UHF trunking radios as well as odd band splits that may be an issue but for the most part a UHF radio from most parts of the country will not be an issue.
Do your research and you will find that commercial radios are far better than the average GMRS radio.
And if you shop around you may indeed find that bargain.
 

talkpair

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But there is a lot of really cheap equipment out there that may make it worth while.
As tempting as used commercial gear may seem, I would be especially cautious when selecting a portable radio.

My thinking is that as soon as it's known that certain radio models are no longer in service, there will be no more batteries made for those models.

While other high-wear parts, such as knobs, speaker-mike cords and antennas can be cannibalized from dysfunctional gear, batteries have a shelf life.

Time will tell if 3rd party manufacturers of batteries will continue to support obsolete equipment.
Some of that business decision could come from previous sales of certain batteries, which in turn goes back to the popularity of the model line itself, as well as popularity in the used radio market. Hams have probably contributed to continued battery availability through their purchases of batteries for their used commercial gear. I'm getting the feeling that the trend in amateur radio may be shifting away from used commercial gear, and toward cheap and lightweight Chinese portables.

For as long as the HT220 model has been out of production, batteries are still available to this day. That model line was popular for a couple decades. While the MT500 battery usually has a different part number, it's dimensions and voltage are the same as the HT220.
Even if a HT220/MT500 battery were to become unavailable, both radios still have the compartment and space to house a couple 9V transistor batteries.

A problem with more recent radios, such as an HT50, for example, use a battery that doubles as a rear housing for the radio. A person would need to carefully dissect this battery to remove/replace cells.

My advice in choosing a portable would be to look at the battery first. If the battery is interchangeable with another model that's narrow band compliant, then it's probably safe to assume that batteries will continue to be available for a while.
 
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