Greater London trunked radio systems

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mciupa

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I was hoping that someone who resides in the area can check the validity of these systems:

The Z Hotel SohoNXDNLondonGreater London01-29-2019Corinthia Hotel LondonDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Hilton London MetropoleDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Halal Pizza ShopDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Harley Street Ambulance LondonNXDNLondonGreater London01-28-2019Patient Transport Service LondonNXDNLondonGreater London01-28-2019Special Ambulance Transfer Service (SATS)DMRLondonGreater London 01-28-2019

I have a suspicion that the submitter was giving false information and by co-incidence most talkgroups are encrypted. They are also flooding Western Canada with their submissions.
 
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IcomIcR20

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I can't confirm those systems personally, but I will say that it wouldn't be surprising to see those systems as encrypted. Encryption is very prevelant in Europe and IIRC scanning is illegal or mostly in the UK and much of Europe.
 

GW7MGW

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If some one by accident hears something over non broadcast radio they are only permitted to pass this on to the authorities like the Police for example, so to publish anything said would be breaking the law.

Other that to state the frequency is for amateur radio or for PMR you can't within the law publish the frequencies used. However as far as amateur radio is concerned it is an accepted hobby to monitor to short wave contacts and to inform the operators (not any one else) what you have heard as to signal strength and quality.

Even with amateur or CB to act on some thing heard i.e. drive your break down truck to scene of break down you could be taken to court. So using a scanner for your own interest OK very little can be done, but to tell some one what or where you hear a transmission is some thing else.
 

Brunlea

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If some one by accident hears something over non broadcast radio they are only permitted to pass this on to the authorities like the Police for example, so to publish anything said would be breaking the law.

Other that to state the frequency is for amateur radio or for PMR you can't within the law publish the frequencies used. However as far as amateur radio is concerned it is an accepted hobby to monitor to short wave contacts and to inform the operators (not any one else) what you have heard as to signal strength and quality.

Even with amateur or CB to act on some thing heard i.e. drive your break down truck to scene of break down you could be taken to court. So using a scanner for your own interest OK very little can be done, but to tell some one what or where you hear a transmission is some thing else.
You are allowed to publish frequencies used. Most frequencies in use within the UK are published on the Ofcom website for the public to access and see who is licensed, etc. It's public information.

You can listen to aviation at some airports within the UK as long as you are in their visitors area made for viewing and listening. One such example is Manchester airport which had a notice giving you permission, listed frequencies in use and had a shop for you to buy the monitoring equipment.

You can't be taken to court for listening and acting on something heard on amateur / CB radio in the example you used. That is utter nonsense.

Searching through frequencies on your scanner and trying to ascertain what a transmission is is not an offence until you store it knowing it is not an amateur and/or public broadcast.
 

citylink_uk

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I was hoping that someone who resides in the area can check the validity of these systems:

The Z Hotel SohoNXDNLondonGreater London01-29-2019Corinthia Hotel LondonDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Hilton London MetropoleDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Halal Pizza ShopDMRLondonGreater London01-29-2019Harley Street Ambulance LondonNXDNLondonGreater London01-28-2019Patient Transport Service LondonNXDNLondonGreater London01-28-2019Special Ambulance Transfer Service (SATS)DMRLondonGreater London 01-28-2019

I have a suspicion that the submitter was giving false information and by co-incidence most talkgroups are encrypted. They are also flooding Western Canada with their submissions.
I would delete all of those. They look false and most of the frequencies don't even fit in with the UK frequency band plan.
 

wa8pyr

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I would delete all of those. They look false and most of the frequencies don't even fit in with the UK frequency band plan.
Rich,

If you would, please go through those and if any look false, go ahead and delete them (if they haven't been already).

Thanks,

Tom
 

GW7MGW

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You are allowed to publish frequencies used. Most frequencies in use within the UK are published on the Ofcom website for the public to access and see who is licensed, etc. It's public information.

You can listen to aviation at some airports within the UK as long as you are in their visitors area made for viewing and listening. One such example is Manchester airport which had a notice giving you permission, listed frequencies in use and had a shop for you to buy the monitoring equipment.

You can't be taken to court for listening and acting on something heard on amateur / CB radio in the example you used. That is utter nonsense.

Searching through frequencies on your scanner and trying to ascertain what a transmission is is not an offence until you store it knowing it is not an amateur and/or public broadcast.
Like anyone licenced I do get sent from time to time the rules and regulations, think I have to validate licence every 3 years and I have not noticed any changes in the rules. However since I have held Falklands and Hong Kong licences as well as UK I may have got it wrong maybe one of the other countries, but I though it did say in those rules that you were not permitted to pass on information to a third party except when working with RAYNET and that is why we had to join RAYNET as by doing so it allows you to pass on third party messages.
 

Pete_uk

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Essentially, other than ham, cb or broadcast stations its illegal to listen into any other transmissions. But the old bill and Ofcom have bigger fish to fry.

I believe you have to renew your licence with a quick phone call every five years. I still have my M6 and 2E0 as well as my M0.
 
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