Ham lic in relation to FM.

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Ref-Jazzy

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This may be an incredibly stupid question, but I would like to ask any ways. I hope any further posts of mine will prove im not an idiot, just new to Ham. I have been working in the RF field for 3 years now, (mostly FSK and OFDM radios.) Any who on to the question,

Lets say I have an Fm tranmitter that is more powerful than the FCC allows in the unlicensed band, and i want to transmit at its full potential. If I acquire a Ham Lic will I be able to? Below are the specs of the transmitter and then the rules from the FCC in regards to unlicensed Fm transmitters.


Thanks In advance!


---Transmitter:
Frequency range: 87 ~ 109Mhz
Frequency Step value: 0.1MHz
Frequency stabilization way: PLL
Frequency stability: ± 10 ppm (-10 ° C +60 ° C )
Frequency Modulation: ≤ ± 75kHz (100%)
Work methods: continuous work
Clutter and Harmonic: less than-60dB
SNR: ≥ 60dB
Stereo separation:-50dB
Audio frequency response: 20 to 15000Hz
Audio distortion: <2%
Modulation: 15%
Input Level:-15dBV
RF output impedance: 50 Ohm
Unit dimensions: length of 105mm, 65mm width, and height of 27mm

---FCC Guidelines

Unlicensed operation on the AM and FM radio broadcast bands is permitted for some extremely low powered devices covered under Part 15 of the FCC rules. On the FM broadcast band, these devices are limited to an approximate effective service range of 35-100 feet. The Maximum Effective Radiated Power (ERP) is .01 microwatts. The rule actually specifies a limit of 250 micro-volts per meter at 3 meters. See Part 15.209 and 15.239. These devices must accept any interference caused by any other operation, which may further limit the effective service range.
 

kc8mvw

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This radio information is outside of the allocated band plan for amateur radio operators. Having a Ham license will NOT permit you to utilize that radio on those frequencies in ANY fashion. If you wish to utilize that radio, you need to get the appropriate business band license.

HTH

73

Bill, KC8MVW
 

James_Bond_007

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This radio information is outside of the allocated band plan for amateur radio operators. Having a Ham license will NOT permit you to utilize that radio on those frequencies in ANY fashion. If you wish to utilize that radio, you need to get the appropriate business band license.

HTH

73

Bill, KC8MVW
did you notice the frequencies (87-109 MHz) ??? it's definitely not business band ;)
 

kc8mvw

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did you notice the frequencies (87-109 MHz) ??? it's definitely not business band ;)
Actually I did. Some businesses have been able to get licenses for those frequencies. But it's a crap shoot. The OP would have to file everything with the FCC and hope they grant the application.
 

zz0468

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Actually I did. Some businesses have been able to get licenses for those frequencies. But it's a crap shoot. The OP would have to file everything with the FCC and hope they grant the application.
Commercial broadcasters are businesses, so it stands to reason... But are they getting licenses for other than broadcast purposes in that frequency range? If so, I'd be interested to heat what for.
 

Ref-Jazzy

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Thanks for all the input. I was planning on setting the transmitter up at my folks place, so that my mom could transmit music from her music server throughout the house and yard. I understand the radio is way more powerful than allowed, We are planning on attenuating it down to be legal. I was just thinking that maybe if she had a Ham lic she may be able to use it at full potential. As I said, I'm quite new to HAM.
 

n5ims

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Please note that ham licenses only authorize you (with very few specific exceptions) to conduct two way communication, not one way broadcasts. Broadcasting music like you're asking about would not be legal and would be poorly tolerated by other hams.

What you're trying to accomplish could probably be done pretty easily using WIFI and a WIFI enabled pocket PC or small netbook and be completely legal. This would make it a two-way device as well so she could select what music to play while in the yard as well.
 

kb2vxa

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OK, let's stop dancing and get right to the question. First, a ham license has nothing to do with anything but ham radio so toss that one out. A transmitter and antenna system capable of more than the 100mW ERP Part 15 limit but throttled back is iffy at best, the FCC has busted SO many on "intent to use" it's not funny so toss that one out too.

There are FM broadcasting Part 15 transmitters and kits available (Ramsey is one) but reports say they generally suck raw eggs, likely due to poor setup and high expectations that cannot be achieved. I would imagine putting one on an upper floor at or close to the center of the house should adequately cover it. Remember these things have very limited range so as with any broadcast installation your coverage area comes down to "location, location, location" and with such low power it becomes critical.

I'm not too keen on the WiFi idea being a KISS believer and you know how mothers are, if you don't keep it simple you'll end up married to the darn thing with her on the phone calling you every 5 minutes. If she drove you nuts trying to figure out the VCR you'll shoot yourself for giving her WiFi. (;->)
 
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