Has coweta county, ga fully switched to the new system

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Ctaylor1016

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Just curious, but i havent been listening either way. I'm still to broke to get me a new digital scanner. Im using the pro95 and am sure I cant listen on that anymore. Are there any live scanner feeds for the new system, if not will there ever be?
 

N8IAA

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Well, you are correct about the Pro-95. It is analog only, will not receive any rebanded systems. It makes a really good analog, conventional scanner. There is a feed of Newnan online here at RR. Just like you, not everyone has multiple scanners and free internet access to run a feed. Who knows, maybe someone will in the future.
Larry
 

Metrofire31

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Coweta County

In answer to your original question, I believe the answer is "no". To the best of my knowledge, most, if not all, Coweta County agencies are now on the WARRS system. The City of Newnan, unless it has happened in the last couple of weeks, has still not moved to the trunked system. I don't have any inside information as to whether they even plan to move but I would certainly think they would. Anyone else know?

Mike
"Metrofire31"
Atlanta
 

TAK21

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I assume all Coweta County agencies are on WARRS because my old scanner went silent. I am using a Pro 197 now and it works great monitoring WARRS. The only exception that I know of for the county is the school buses. I still get those on conventional 461.3000

I am still listening to the City of Newnan on their conventional frequencies. I haven't heard anything about them moving to WARRS.
 

puterman

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The city (Newnan) is in no hurry to switch last I heard.
I listen to the Warrs both in Coweta and Carroll. So far they have not linked the 2 systems.
 

k4sgt

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I assume all Coweta County agencies are on WARRS because my old scanner went silent. I am using a Pro 197 now and it works great monitoring WARRS. The only exception that I know of for the county is the school buses. I still get those on conventional 461.3000

I am still listening to the City of Newnan on their conventional frequencies. I haven't heard anything about them moving to WARRS.
FYI I am in the middle of converting the school busses to DMR. If you still want to listen you can use the DSD program to decode it when it goes hot. I am not programming the system with encryption. I hate encrytion and only use it when I have to.
 

TAK21

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FYI I am in the middle of converting the school busses to DMR. If you still want to listen you can use the DSD program to decode it when it goes hot. I am not programming the system with encryption. I hate encrytion and only use it when I have to.
Not familiar with DSD. Is that scanner or computer based? My wife is not going to be a happy camper if she can't listen to the the buses.
 

N8IAA

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Not familiar with DSD. Is that scanner or computer based? My wife is not going to be a happy camper if she can't listen to the the buses.
PC based. It uses Linux. It is digital decoding software. You will need a radio that has access to the IF. The only scanner that has that option is the PSR-800.
Larry
 

ki4gyw

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I know Heard CO. Buses are running TRBO also (I built the server and configured the system!). Im heading through that way to columbus in a few days, I have DSD and OP25 on my SDR Computer. I'll see what I can log.
 

TAK21

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Dang. I guess scanning as a hobby really is dying off. I just bought this new scanner, at a premium price for digital, and already won't be able to monitor one of our favorite things. This is sad since "we the people" are supposed to own these public systems. I know it's not encryted, but what general citizen can run a separate linux system?

Oh well. More lost freedom, more government control seems to be the norm these days.
 

Ctaylor1016

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Thanks, but

what can I listen to on the pro95? The main freq's I followed were 155.165, 151.130 and 155.295 and the FD, but don't remember the freq's right off hand. And there is no way to mod this darn pro95 is there?
 

Ctaylor1016

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and could someone please give me a freq list of what I can actually still listen to on the pro95 here in Coweta. Thanks!
 

MTS2000des

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Dang. I guess scanning as a hobby really is dying off. I just bought this new scanner, at a premium price for digital, and already won't be able to monitor one of our favorite things. This is sad since "we the people" are supposed to own these public systems. I know it's not encryted, but what general citizen can run a separate linux system?

Oh well. More lost freedom, more government control seems to be the norm these days.
Freedom to monitor radio systems was only afforded to citizens because the technology to encode/encrypt was costly, cumbersome, and only available from a few vendors.

It's 2012, this isn't the case anymore. Even "budget" radio vendors like Ritron and Midland offer digital radios.

If you want to vent frustration, how about at the scanner manufacturers who are more interested in selling consumer grade crap with fancy UI's and ergonomics versus real radios with performing front ends, superior DSP, and SDR to support the multitude of formats and codecs used in LMR today.

The excuse that "it costs to much" is nonsense if DSD can be run on a Linux computer with a simple discriminator tap. Kenwood sells NexEDGE radios for LESS than Uniden sells the HP1. It's simply the case as the scanner vendors aren't interested in putting real effort into building radios that properly decode digital modulations such as P25 phase 1 CQPSK, NXDN, Turbo and P-25 phase II because they can keep selling the garbage they are having pumped out of their overseas sweatshops at great profits.

So please get it right, your local governments aren't trying to hide school bus radio traffic with MotoTRBO, they are on their own mission to keep up with the needless mandates from Radio Spectrum Sales and Leasing aka the FCC.
 

TAK21

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So please get it right, your local governments aren't trying to hide school bus radio traffic with MotoTRBO, they are on their own mission to keep up with the needless mandates from Radio Spectrum Sales and Leasing aka the FCC.
I agree. Same thing said a different way. FCC = Government. Our government pushes a public agenda of transparency while systematically removing it in the background.
 

TAK21

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and could someone please give me a freq list of what I can actually still listen to on the pro95 here in Coweta. Thanks!
The only thing I know for sure are the conventional frequencies listed under Newnan in this list.

Coweta County, Georgia (GA) Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference

The County, Senoia and Grantville have converted to WARRS.

Some neighboring counties have Motorola Type II Trunking systems that I listen to, but I think rebanding is a problem with the Pro 95.
 

k4sgt

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So please get it right, your local governments aren't trying to hide school bus radio traffic with MotoTRBO, they are on their own mission to keep up with the needless mandates from Radio Spectrum Sales and Leasing aka the FCC.
True that the school board radio system will be meeting the narrowbanding mandate by upgrading to this system, but they chose Mototrbo for the advanced features. They will be tracking each bus via GPS and also have the ability for each bus driver to clock in and out from work from the radio interface. Digital radio systems are all about fancy data applications and digital voice is just something that comes along with it.
 

k4sgt

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I know Heard CO. Buses are running TRBO also (I built the server and configured the system!). Im heading through that way to columbus in a few days, I have DSD and OP25 on my SDR Computer. I'll see what I can log.
When you are in Columbus give a shout on 442.100+ PL 123.0 if you get bored.
 

MTS2000des

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True that the school board radio system will be meeting the narrowbanding mandate by upgrading to this system, but they chose Mototrbo for the advanced features. They will be tracking each bus via GPS and also have the ability for each bus driver to clock in and out from work from the radio interface. Digital radio systems are all about fancy data applications and digital voice is just something that comes along with it.
These features are also available on LTR systems, and have been for about 10 years. Kenwood's FleetSync signaling package and software offers GPS with AVL, short messaging, status updates, and asset tracking and has been available way before MotoTRBO existed, going back to 2000 when the TK880/380 series came out.

One doesn't have to buy digital radios to get those features, and in some cases, many board of education systems already own those radios. Buy the Fleetsync package, add GPS boards to the radios, and you have the same functionality without replacing perfectly good radios (and they're fully narrowband compliant too)
 

k4sgt

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These features are also available on LTR systems, and have been for about 10 years. Kenwood's FleetSync signaling package and software offers GPS with AVL, short messaging, status updates, and asset tracking and has been available way before MotoTRBO existed, going back to 2000 when the TK880/380 series came out.

One doesn't have to buy digital radios to get those features, and in some cases, many board of education systems already own those radios. Buy the Fleetsync package, add GPS boards to the radios, and you have the same functionality without replacing perfectly good radios (and they're fully narrowband compliant too)
I am not saying that all of this stuff is brand new and never before seen, but some of it is. Never before have you been able to link a radio system and the popular SoftDocs software. With a Mototrbo system you now can. This potentially enables a lot of functionality, but the Coweta system is looking for the ability for their workers to be able to clock in and out from work from their radios. The action is logged on the actual SoftDocs server just as if an employee was at the office clocking in. With the advent of digital radio taking advantage of IP infrastructure, we are intering a new age of capabilities for radio systems. This is the next breakthrough. Now, if only there were a digital radio system that sounds as good as my digital cell phone!
 
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