Hawking Hi-Gain 15dBi Outdoor Omni-Directional Antenna

Status
Not open for further replies.

cbake777

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Messages
7
Location
Brevard, NC
I'm trying to determine if an outdoor antenna that I currently own could be converted (shortened?) to be a scanner antenna. I know it's a long shot but worth asking. Here are the specs for the antenna:

Electrical Properties
Frequency: 2.4~2.4835 Ghz
Impedence: 50 Ohms Nominal
Gain: 15dBi
Radiation: Omni
Polorization: Vertical
H-Plan:360º
E-Plan: 30º
Mechanical Properties
Connector: RP-SMA and N-Plug
Material Properties
Color:White & Silver
Body: Brass & Ni Plating
Pin: Phosphor Bronze Gold
Insulator:Teflon or Delrin
Dimensions: 48 (H) x 1 (r) in (w/out joint)
Weight: 2.2 lbs

Since it is already wired into the house, it would be great if I could modify it to work with my old HH scanner, RS Pro-26 1.3GHz for better reception. We are in the mountains and I get decent reception with the telescoping antenna but would like to get an antenna outside and either a better base unit for inside the house. House has metal roof. Any suggestions appreciated.
 

br0adband

Member
Joined
Apr 8, 2005
Messages
1,570
Location
Springfield MO
Realistically (pun very much intended with respect to the scanner brand) you're going to end up with something that's utterly useless in most respects if you were to attempt to do what you're hoping to attempt to do, as convoluted as that sounds. :)

Because most every frequency that hobbyists tend to monitor in general lies between 100 kHz and roughly 1 GHz then such a hack on that hardware will eventually prove (again) useless because to lower the effective frequency reception capabilities of the current stock hardware you'd have to lengthen the receiving element - and by this specific range of frequencies from 100 kHz to 1 GHz I mean all the public service and commercial comms that take place around the world, I don't mean microwave transmissions well above 1 GHz except perhaps the Ham band around 1.2 GHz aka the 23cm band and I personally have never known of anyone that uses that band but it's there for that purpose.

If I were to make a suggestion myself I'd say go for a discone if you have the ability to get one, I won't recommend a particular brand or model since there's a ton of info on such antennas in this very subforum already (the Scanner/Receiver Antennas subforum where this thread is posted). I'm sure someone else will probably say "if he's in the mountains at a high altitude then perhaps a discone isn't a good antenna because of how the discone's reception propagation works - it receives better if the transmitters are above the discone itself..." and that's true to many degrees, but for an all-around wideband that that can pull in a huge swath of frequencies I'd like to think it's one of the best options out there in any situation.

There are some really good all-band or wideband design antennas that aren't discones, of course, like the popular Scantenna which I believe it no longer in production but you might find one on eBay or from someone here at RR in the Classifieds section for a decent price, or something of a similar nature that could work great in your particular set up there in the mountains. Being up that high is a good thing for reception, really, but if you're in the middle of a large chunk of mountainous area they could also prove to be detrimental to reception by literally blocking signals with billions of tons of rock. :)

Anyway, some things to consider I suppose, pretty sure others will chime in here quick so, keep an eye on the thread as more info comes in.

I will add one thing, just for the record: the Pro-26 is a very very old analog scanner and while it's quite capable in the analog reception respect with a very wide reception range, you might consider thinking about getting something newer for a variety of reasons: might have some digital systems in your reception area (P25/DMR/etc) as that branch of comms is expanding rapidly over traditional analog systems), newer scanners have vastly improved reception sensitivity and lower noise problems overall, and other reasons as well.

Hell, for $10-25 these days you can buy one of the "cheap USB TV tuners" - literally a USB stick that's a TV tuner designed for the European digital TV standard years ago but was rapidly gutted out and replaced with an entirely different system that was incompatible so a few million of those sticks became useless instantly until some talented coder realized he could modify the driver for the tuner itself and then wham, suddenly it became a wideband radio receiver and sparked a new "boom" in the hobby with RTL-SDR. There's a subforum here about it with a lot more info:

https://forums.radioreference.com/software-defined-radio/

and considering what's possible with even a $10 RTL-SDR based stick for a tuner + something as simple as SDR# (SDRSharp, the most popular SDR application there is) and a working PC/Mac/Linux desktop or laptop (SDR# is a Windows app but it can run on Linux and macOS with virtualization and other tricks, plus those platforms have their own SDR applications as well coded for them specifically) you can tune in pretty much anything from 25 MHz to 1.7 GHz (the higher end is less sensitive on the lower cost RTL-SDR sticks, if you spend more money to get something like an Airspy or SDRplay you get a much better total coverage range, especially with SDRplay which offers 10 kHz to 2 GHz or even higher as I'm not sure about the current spec, think it's like $100 these days, an awesome piece of hardware).

Basically, having that old analog scanner is fine if it's doing exactly what you want but there are other options now that offer a lot more potential, it's up to you of course to decide what your intentions are for the future. Personally I use RTL sticks myself for a few years now, I did have a physical digital capable scanner recently - my first digital one actually, and I sold it fast for a decent profit because I didn't actually need it anymore thanks to SDR and how it has become my go-to way of monitoring with my laptop (I don't do desktops anymore).

Hope something here in this post proves useful. :D
 
Last edited:

cbake777

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Jan 4, 2007
Messages
7
Location
Brevard, NC
Thanks a lot Broadband, I knew it was a longshot. We sit at 2680' elevation but happen to be in a cove which doesn't help with reception as the mtns on either side of us reach 2900'-3100' sort of blocking us. We currently have a fugitive hunt underway in the forest near us and I broke out the old Pro-26 which has been surprisingly effective but not as great as we were hoping for. I'm thinking of a base station and outside antenna to possibly get better reception.

Thanks, Chris
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
14,650
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
Since resonate frequency goes up as you shorten an antenna, cutting an antenna designed for 2.4GHz is going to make it perform better on frequencies above 2.4GHz.

The only way to make that antenna work as a scanner antenna on lower frequencies is going to be making it longer. Changing the measurements will change how the individual elements are phased together.

It'd be a lot of work to do correctly, and in the end you'd do better making your own antenna from scratch.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top