Help with a Antennacraft ST2

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scannerk

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It's been a while since I've logged on here, 5 years to be exact. I'm just getting back into scanners again and just bought a Antennacraft ST2 antenna.

I have 4 scanners that I'd like to hook up to the antenna, is this possible, if so how would I go about doing this?

I've seen others tie transformers and amps into the connection between the scanner and antenna, what are the reasons for doing this, can I go without these and just mount the antenna?

Any suggestions on mounting the antenna?

Thank you!
 

n5ims

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Jul 25, 2004
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I have 4 scanners that I'd like to hook up to the antenna, is this possible, if so how would I go about doing this?
Start out here (--> http://forums.radioreference.com/splitters-filters-multicouplers/105054-using-one-antenna-multiple-scanners.html <--) and most of your questions should be answered.

I've seen others tie transformers and amps into the connection between the scanner and antenna, what are the reasons for doing this, can I go without these and just mount the antenna?
The antenna is designed to be used with that old 300 ohm twinlead feedline (think of the TV antenna feedline used prior to Cable-TV). To convert it to something more useful, you'll need that 300 to 75 ohm balun (looks like a transformer). This should've been included with the antenna, but if not, they're easy to find at your local Radio Shack (get the one designed for outdoor mounting (http://www.radioshack.com/product/?productId=2062049) or you'll have moisture issues!!!). You can then use some standard RG-6 coax to move from your antenna to your scanner.

An amp is good if you have weak signals (and none that are real strong, even out-of-band like FM or TV broadcast stations with nearby towers) and you're in a rural area. If you're in the city or locations where there are strong signals an amp can make things worse. Basically (and least expensively) you can set things up without an amp and add one later quite easily if you find you really need one.

Any suggestions on mounting the antenna?
Get a 10' (or better) metal pole and mount it where you can do so securely. Mount the antenna to the top and route the cable safely into your scanner location (yes, it's that simple!).

Now the hard part, grounding. Drive one or more ground rods near the antenna mount location to ground it. Attach a ground wire (#6 or larger - physically larger, with smaller wire gauge numbers) to the mounting pole. Where it enters your house, place more ground rods and attach them to a ground block (like --> http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2150597).

Note that this grounding information has been simplified to cover the absolute minimum basics. Search the forums here for better and more complete descriptions on what you should do.
 
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scannerk

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Thank you. Does it have to be a metal pole or can I use a PVC pole? Is grounding required?
 

WA0CBW

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The NEC (National Electrical Code) requires that the coax shield and the mast supporting an antenna be grounded. If you use PVC for a mast then grounding the coax shield would be the minimum required. Make sure the shield of the coax is connected to the antenna ground (if there is one). Also remember that all additional grounds need to be connected to the electrical system ground. Single point grounding is key to good protection.
 

LIScanner101

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In case where the main supporting structure is nonmetallic (as in the case of using a sturdy PVC pipe to support an antenna), would it be a good practice to add a few pipe clamps around the PVC pipe (a few feet below the antenna) and then run a heavy copper wire ground wire down to the ground, then connect it to the long copper stake that’s in the ground? I understand that PVC isn’t conductive, but if lightning does strike the antenna, a bazillion volts is going to treat PVC like it’s semiconductive anyway and will try to find the lowest resistive point to earth ground, so…
 
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