Hemet, CA - Police: San Jacinto woman arrested after making threats on police radio

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cousinkix1953

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Some of you guys heard about the May Day riot on Saturday night up in Santa Cruz. County Comm received several "phony" shots fired calls to distract the police from the real crime scene. Law enforcement agencies use the same kind of obsolete VHF radios, which can be jammed with a modified 2 meter ham radio. Maybe next time; because they do this May Day rally/riot stuff annually.
 

monitor142

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Sadly Mark, you are correct. With everything going on out in Hemet right now, not a smart move. I wonder if a ham related to the suspect has anything to say. Mike Levy (KE6ALV) has the same last name as the suspect and both their calls come back to the same address at the trailer park. He frequents a lot of the SoCal based scanner groups. Pretty dumb move....
 

Markb

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Yeah, I'm sure it's a tough situation for Mike. I've interacted with him on those lists throughout the years and he seems like a stand-up guy. Who knows what is going on in his personal life? Obviously it's none of our business, but I certainly hope he's not directly culpable in any way on this. She is a licensed ham and knows the rules (not that you have to be a ham to know that interfering is wrong). Either way you slice it, it's not good.
 

scannerfreak

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I attempted to merge two threads on this topic and apparently a few posts disappeared somehow. Sorry :)
 

Markb

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Expensive encryption is not required to eliminate this problem. A digital TRS would do just fine!
That's not what Motorola would tell them! Besides, the county is building out a 700/800/VHF Smartzone system, reportedly with encryption and I wouldn't be surprised if this incident drives some law agencies to jump on the bandwagon.
 

cousinkix1953

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Expensive encryption is not required to eliminate this problem. A digital TRS would do just fine!
No! And the city of Santa Cruz doesn't even wanna buy P-25 radios by 2013; because "narrow-banding" is good enough for the FCC. The University of California is already using an analog Motorola TRS on 800 mhz. That alone will be enough to avoid anarchists or an idiot obsessed with jamming police calls with his VHF ham gear.

The FCC created this problem; when they put Part 97 type acceptance stickers on transceivers capable of transmitting way beyond the bands assigned to the amateur radio service. The RACES / ARES guys, who monitor police channels during special events, should be satisfied with a scanner like everybody else. They don't need this extra band in a Yaesu, Kenwood or Icom HT without the proper license to even use it.

Commercial fishermen are buying these 2 meter rigs too; because they cover the 55 channel marine band and beyond. I hear them cussing up a storm about those god---- sea lions on inactive police and fire frequencies. Every little group has it's own illegal business channnel.

The Santa Cruz PD used to have those Donald Duck scramblers back in the 1970s. "All units Code S." City hall wasn't big on this Orange County's "secret police" stuff either. It costs more $$$. The only encryption we hear now is the State Bureau of Narcotics or some federal agencies...
 

blantonl

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Now that I look it appears we have very good coverage in Hemet. If anyone is familiar with the times she was jamming and broadcasting we can pull the archives to make a further "example" out of her.
 

cj5

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You know as long as you keep your public safety entitites fat and happy, everyone else can go to He**, right? While teachers are taking furloughs and more and more funding is being withdrawn from public services, it seems there's always plenty of money around to give to the police force to have their high tech toys. They do not need digital 800mhz radio systems, what they need to do is stop being lazy, and learn how to be effective police. While other Californians are struggling to make ends meet, all you greedy "don't tax me" whiners seem to have enough money for buying unnecessary toys. Public safety seems to be a tax revenue hog!
 

kb2vxa

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"Police also seized Levy’s Ham radio technician’s license issued to her by the FCC in September of 2009, Richards said."
Now that was completely pointless, unless the license itself and not the piece of paper is canceled by the FCC she still holds a valid license. This makes me wonder what they intend to do with a little meaningless scrap of paper when the proper thing to do is file a formal complaint with the FCC which has sole jurisdiction in the first place.

"The FCC created this problem; when they put Part 97 type acceptance stickers on transceivers capable of transmitting way beyond the bands assigned to the amateur radio service." Where did you come up with that notion? I have yet to see a transmitter certified for Part 97 service capable of transmitting out of band. Most, if not all Amateur transceivers are fully capable to receive out of band and may be modified to transmit over their receive range but that voids the certification.

As an aside, Amateur transmitters need not be certified provided only one of a kind is manufactured per year allowing hams to construct their own without going through the hassle of extensive and detailed testing and all the associated paperwork required for certification. The only reason why commercially produced transmitters are certified is because all that was done in the prototype development stage and then mass produced, a whole lot more than one per year.
 

w5dmt

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Interesting note about seizing her license... You're right about it being pointless, but it's also illegal. They just set themselves up to get beat up by the FCC, since they're the only ones who can legally do so.
 

bryan_herbert

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Just so everyone knows. Mike was at work when this all went down and had nothing to do with it. He is just as shocked and saddened as everyone else, if not more so, seeing as it has to do with his wife. Because this is an open investigation do not expect Mike to comment. It is also best if we not jump to any conclusions or jump on any bandwagons. It wouldnt do any good to assume what exactly happened when Mike himself doesnt even know. Mike has been a respectable radio operator for years therefore deserves our respect.
 

kb2vxa

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"Interesting note about seizing her license... You're right about it being pointless, but it's also illegal."
I see nothing illegal about seizing a piece of paper, it's only the certificate of license and not the license itself. Hey, I'll bet she still has the wallet size certificate... HA HA!

"They just set themselves up to get beat up by the FCC, since they're the only ones who can legally do so."
Not so, see above. As an aside in a similar situation, some years ago the city of Elizabeth NJ sought to shut down a rowdy bar without success until the police got tough, REAL tough. They repeatedly raided the joint Untouchables style arresting many on charges ranging from drunk and disorderly conduct to lewd and lascivious behavior (gays were not protected back then) which discouraged most patrons but a hard core few remained. Finally the Chief himself confiscated the state liquor license certificate, I don't know if the state ever got involved or not, maybe he just put one over on the owner but in any case the next day the doors were sealed (not just locked) and that was the end of it. Today a parking garage occupies the site, all's well that ends well.
 

n1das

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"The FCC created this problem; when they put Part 97 type acceptance stickers on transceivers capable of transmitting way beyond the bands assigned to the amateur radio service." Where did you come up with that notion? I have yet to see a transmitter certified for Part 97 service capable of transmitting out of band. Most, if not all Amateur transceivers are fully capable to receive out of band and may be modified to transmit over their receive range but that voids the certification.

As an aside, Amateur transmitters need not be certified provided only one of a kind is manufactured per year allowing hams to construct their own without going through the hassle of extensive and detailed testing and all the associated paperwork required for certification. The only reason why commercially produced transmitters are certified is because all that was done in the prototype development stage and then mass produced, a whole lot more than one per year.
There is no Part 97 type acceptance. The certification is for the receiver under Part 15 to ensure that the local oscillator(s) don't pose a harmful interference threat and to enforce the cell phone frequency censorship. This is covered under Part 2 of FCC rules pertaining to the marketing of a radio frequency device. Part 15 covers the technical rules. From a purely FCC type acceptance/certification point of view, commercially made ham transceivers are treated as scanning receivers given the general coverage receiver capability and no type acceptance required for the transmiter. The transmitter as a minimum needs only to be designed and built to best engineering practices per Part 97 rules. Given that a lot of commercially made ham transceivers are often based on an existing commercial design, the design and building to best engineering practices has already been addressed by the manufacturer.

Given that the ham transmitter is not type accepted for ANY radio service at all, being offered for sale while capable of transmitting outside the ham bands voids the Part 15 cert.
 
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Haole

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Yeah, I'm sure it's a tough situation for Mike. I've interacted with him on those lists throughout the years and he seems like a stand-up guy. Who knows what is going on in his personal life? Obviously it's none of our business, but I certainly hope he's not directly culpable in any way on this. She is a licensed ham and knows the rules (not that you have to be a ham to know that interfering is wrong). Either way you slice it, it's not good.
Mike is a standup guy.. Sad to see him in this situation. Bonehead move on his wife's part... One bad apple ruins the bunch.
 
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