Hope to get back into scanning.

wtd

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I just re-discovered this website after being gone for years. I think the last time I was on here the Uniden Home Patrol 2 was the newest thing by Uniden. Back then I never bought any of the new stuff on the market and my 3000XLT is the last scanner I have bought which tells you that was many years ago.

Now that I'm retired I would like to get back into scanning. I was obsessed with it back in the early 90's when I bought my first scanner which I believe was a Uniden 100XLT. I've pulled out the only two that I have left which are a BC 200XLT and a BC UBC3000XLT and are charging them. I doubt the batteries will hold a charge but they may still work with the cords. I don't know if these two are even usable these days as I have been away for years and just browsing through some of these posts makes me realize I don't have a clue how to operate these new ones.

Any general suggestions on what I should be looking to get for a scanner these days. We travel quite a bit so I probably want a portable and something that would be able to access things in different areas. I'm not adverse to spending some money to get a good one. Thanks.
 

KR3LC

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Let us know where you live. City. County. State. Province. It's necessary to know this information so we can see what types of systems are used in your area. Also let us know what are your listening interests: Police. Life. Etc.

Those older scanners will certainly be fine for aircraft, railroad, marine and most anything else still using conventional analog systems.
 

TailGator911

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Uncertain times are on the horizon. Just cut to the chase and get a scanner that covers it all so you won't regret doing so in the future and so you will be equipped to hear what you need to hear when you need to hear it. SDS-series scanners are the only make and model that does it all. Be ready to cut thru simulcast if and when you encounter it. Be a Boy Scout and Be Prepared.
 

wtd

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Let us know where you live. City. County. State. Province. It's necessary to know this information so we can see what types of systems are used in your area. Also let us know what are your listening interests: Police. Life. Etc.

Those older scanners will certainly be fine for aircraft, railroad, marine and most anything else still using conventional analog systems.
I live in Lawrence County MO in the city of Aurora. I'm listening to some traffic now on the 3000XLT in the 854.000-858.000 Mhz range which sounds like the police dept in Springfield MO in Greene County which is about 30 miles away.

I like listening to police, EMS, and really anything. I have pulled up the database for my county and the neighboring Greene county and have seen the frequencies for various services but I don't understand the different systems in use and which ones that my current scanners can access.
 
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wtd

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Uncertain times are on the horizon. Just cut to the chase and get a scanner that covers it all so you won't regret doing so in the future and so you will be equipped to hear what you need to hear when you need to hear it. SDS-series scanners are the only make and model that does it all. Be ready to cut thru simulcast if and when you encounter it. Be a Boy Scout and Be Prepared.
I have been reading up on the SDS100 and 200 in the past hour or so and one of those seems like a good bet. I know the 100 is the portable and the 200 the mobile/desktop. Does the 200 do anything more than the 100? So far I'm not real clear on that.
 

K4EET

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Hello @wtd, I see where you made a brief appearance here at Radio Reference back on Jul 12, 2005. You mentioned Uniden's "new" 296 and 396 scanners in your thread. See:


Welcome back!!!

I'm gonna look at your county's systems next. Be back soon...

Cheers! Dave
 

wtd

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Hello @wtd, I see where you made a brief appearance here at Radio Reference back on Jul 12, 2005. You mentioned Uniden's "new" 296 and 396 scanners in your thread. See:


Welcome back!!!

I'm gonna look at your county's systems next. Be back soon...

Cheers! Dave
LOL, I knew it had been awhile since I've been on here. I don't even remember asking about the 296 and 396 scanners.

Thanks for looking my county's system up for me.
 

K4EET

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So here is the Lawrence County, MO page:


Aurora


FrequencyLicenseTypeToneAlpha TagDescriptionModeTag
155.52000WNYA690RM125 DPLAurora PolicePolice: DispatchFMNLaw Dispatch
155.88000WPHN946BMAurora Police 3PoliceFMNLaw Tac
453.37500WQBL571RMAurora PoliceMDTPolice: Mobile Data Terminals (CSQ)TelmData
Aurora Rural Fire Protection District


FrequencyLicenseTypeToneAlpha TagDescriptionModeTag
155.61750WQXE850RMAurora RuralFireFire: Paging/Dispatch/Fireground (in use)FMNFire Dispatch


Here is the Missouri Statewide Wireless Interoperable Network (MOSWIN)


Lawrence County Talkgroups


DECHEXModeAlpha TagDescriptionTag
281016dc5DLawrence ShrfSheriff: DispatchLaw Dispatch
281036dc7DLawrence FireFire: Countywide DispatchFire Dispatch

So what it looks like is your existing scanners are OK for Aurora Police and Aurora Fire but you will need a newer scanner to listen to Lawrence County Sheriff and Lawrence County Fire as well as the Missouri State Police since they are on the MOSWIN system.

I'll post this so we can generate some discussion.

Cheers! Dave
 

K4EET

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As for what scanners you might want to look at, clearly the newest Uniden SDS100 (portable) and Uniden SDS200 (base/mobile) with possibly some options like the GPS Receiver for when you are traveling to let the scanner "know where you are" and it will scan the local systems, the DMR upgrade and the NXDN upgrade. These two scanners were specifically designed to combat what is known as "Simulcast Distortion" which can occur when you are in an overlap area of two or more transmitter sites that are transmitting on the same frequency at the same time. The Uniden SDS100/200 pair are unique in this feature of being able to minimize simulcast distortion. None of the other Uniden scanners have that capability.

Since you will be traveling, you will probably want all of the options so as to "Be Prepared" for anything you might come across.

As for portable versus base/mobile, the feature set is basically the same. Let's say 99.5% the same. What is different does not impact scanning features. The difference is in some features that are unique to a portable radio such as battery saving features, etc. The base/mobile unit obviously does not have a battery. You get the idea.

As for other scanners, the next step down is the Uniden BCD436HP (portable) and the Uniden BCD536HP (base/mobile). These are similar to the SDS series but clearly without the color display, simulcast distortion fighting feature, more advanced firmware, Software defined radio (SDR) features, etc. After all, the Uniden BCD436HP/536HP scanners were announced in November 2014 according to this article. I have the Uniden BCD536HP scanner, live in a multiple simulcast overlap area and have no issues with Simulcast Distortion. In a way I am lucky but I mention this because I don't want you to totally rule out the other scanners. You may have some Simulcast Distortion but it also will not be 100% of the time when you are moving.

As a final comment for this post, you definitely want to stay with scanners that are APCO 25 Phase 2 compliant. That will make sure that you have the "latest and greatest" technology out there.

So here is the next installment... Cheers! Dave
 

iMONITOR

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Does the 200 do anything more than the 100? So far I'm not real clear on that.
The SDS200 has a RJ45 network port. Depending on your needs it's a nice addition. It also has an external speaker jack.

1598679756744.png
 
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jonwienke

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I have been reading up on the SDS100 and 200 in the past hour or so and one of those seems like a good bet. I know the 100 is the portable and the 200 the mobile/desktop. Does the 200 do anything more than the 100? So far I'm not real clear on that.
The 200 has a bigger screen and speaker, and has a network port for streaming audio and controlling the scanner. But there's not much difference as far as reception performance.
 

wtd

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As for what scanners you might want to look at, clearly the newest Uniden SDS100 (portable) and Uniden SDS200 (base/mobile) with possibly some options like the GPS Receiver for when you are traveling to let the scanner "know where you are" and it will scan the local systems, the DMR upgrade and the NXDN upgrade. These two scanners were specifically designed to combat what is known as "Simulcast Distortion" which can occur when you are in an overlap area of two or more transmitter sites that are transmitting on the same frequency at the same time. The Uniden SDS100/200 pair are unique in this feature of being able to minimize simulcast distortion. None of the other Uniden scanners have that capability.

Since you will be traveling, you will probably want all of the options so as to "Be Prepared" for anything you might come across.

As for portable versus base/mobile, the feature set is basically the same. Let's say 99.5% the same. What is different does not impact scanning features. The difference is in some features that are unique to a portable radio such as battery saving features, etc. The base/mobile unit obviously does not have a battery. You get the idea.

As for other scanners, the next step down is the Uniden BCD436HP (portable) and the Uniden BCD536HP (base/mobile). These are similar to the SDS series but clearly without the color display, simulcast distortion fighting feature, more advanced firmware, Software defined radio (SDR) features, etc. After all, the Uniden BCD436HP/536HP scanners were announced in November 2014 according to this article. I have the Uniden BCD536HP scanner, live in a multiple simulcast overlap area and have no issues with Simulcast Distortion. In a way I am lucky but I mention this because I don't want you to totally rule out the other scanners. You may have some Simulcast Distortion but it also will not be 100% of the time when you are moving.

As a final comment for this post, you definitely want to stay with scanners that are APCO 25 Phase 2 compliant. That will make sure that you have the "latest and greatest" technology out there.

So here is the next installment... Cheers! Dave
Wow Dave, thanks for all of the information. I appreciate it. I will probably try to get either the SDS100 or 200 as they seem to be very good scanners. I've pretty much always stayed with Uniden back in the day and have been very happy with them. It will probably be a little while before I can purchase either but I will see what I'm able to hear on my current scanners.
 

wtd

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As far as reliability goes, is the SDS 100 and 200 the same or is one more reliable than the other?
 

hiegtx

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I live in Lawrence County MO in the city of Aurora. I'm listening to some traffic now on the 3000XLT in the 854.000-858.000 Mhz range which sounds like the police dept in Springfield MO in Greene County which is about 30 miles away.

I like listening to police, EMS, and really anything. I have pulled up the database for my county and the neighboring Greene county and have seen the frequencies for various services but I don't understand the different systems in use and which ones that my current scanners can access.
Those 854.000 to 858.000 frequencies that you are hearing are probably from this system:

That's a trunked system, so while you can program some of the frequencies into your 3000XLT & listen as if they were conventional channel frequencies, you would not be able to automatically follow a conversation since your 3000 is not a trunking capable scanner. Also, some of the talkgroups, mostly the Greene County S.O., are using digital talkgroups, and also most are encrypted. You scanner cannot handle digital, and no scanner will ever be able to monitor encrypted radio traffic. (I have my old 3000XLT gathering dust on a shelf with the other 'retired' scanners.)

So here is the Lawrence County, MO page:


Aurora


FrequencyLicenseTypeToneAlpha TagDescriptionModeTag
155.52000WNYA690RM125 DPLAurora PolicePolice: DispatchFMNLaw Dispatch
155.88000WPHN946BMAurora Police 3PoliceFMNLaw Tac
453.37500WQBL571RMAurora PoliceMDTPolice: Mobile Data Terminals (CSQ)TelmData
Aurora Rural Fire Protection District


FrequencyLicenseTypeToneAlpha TagDescriptionModeTag
155.61750WQXE850RMAurora RuralFireFire: Paging/Dispatch/Fireground (in use)FMNFire Dispatch


Here is the Missouri Statewide Wireless Interoperable Network (MOSWIN)


Lawrence County Talkgroups


DECHEXModeAlpha TagDescriptionTag
281016dc5DLawrence ShrfSheriff: DispatchLaw Dispatch
281036dc7DLawrence FireFire: Countywide DispatchFire Dispatch

So what it looks like is your existing scanners are OK for Aurora Police and Aurora Fire but you will need a newer scanner to listen to Lawrence County Sheriff and Lawrence County Fire as well as the Missouri State Police since they are on the MOSWIN system.

I'll post this so we can generate some discussion.

Cheers! Dave
Actually, the talkgroups for Lawrence County on MOSWIN may just be placeholders, or perhaps used only when Lawrence County needs to coordinate with an agency that uses MOSWIN. The database page for the county does not show Lawrence extensively using MOSWIN, indicating their various conventional frequencies. For now, the OP may be able to hear most of the users in Lawrence County unless they've actually shifted to MOSWIN without the change being submitted to the database. For future compatibility, as digital trunked systems become more pervasive & more agencies making the switch, the OP may want to look for at least a scanner capable of P25 Phase I. MOSWIN is tagged as being Phase II, but so far, all listed talkgroups are P25 Phase I. No idea if a change is in the works.

If you want to get a digital capable scanner, capable of handling trunked systems (including Phase II), I would suggest looking at the Uniden 325P2 or 996P2 at a minimum. Or, one of the Whistler database scanners (WS1088, WS1098, TRX-1 or TRX-2; the older WS1080 and WS1095 are the previous models of the WS1088 & WS1098, the difference being that the 1088 & 1098 have keypads, whereas the 1080 and 1095 do not.)

You might want to keep your eyes open on the classifieds here on RadioReference, as well as eBay & other outlets for a good condition pre-owned scanner (don't overlook pawn shops as well as the occasional estate or garage sale, where units generally are sold at a reduced price).
 
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wtd

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Those 854.000 to 858.000 frequencies that you are hearing are probably from this system:

That's a trunked system, so while you can program some of the frequencies into your 3000XLT & listen as if they were conventional channel frequencies, you would not be able to automatically follow a conversation since your 3000 is not a trunking capable scanner. Also, some of the talkgroups, mostly the Greene County S.O., are using digital talkgroups, and also most are encrypted. You scanner cannot handle digital, and no scanner will ever be able to monitor encrypted radio traffic. (I have my old 3000XLT gathering dust on a shelf with the other 'retired' scanners.)


Actually, the talkgroups for Lawrence County on MOSWIN may just be placeholders, or perhaps used only when Lawrence County needs to coordinate with an agency that uses MOSWIN. The database page for the county does not show Lawrence extensively using MOSWIN, indicating their various conventional frequencies. For now, the OP may be able to hear most of the users in Lawrence County unless they've actually shifted to MOSWIN without the change being submitted to the database. For future compatibility, as digital trunked systems become more pervasive & more agencies making the switch, the OP may want to look for at least a scanner capable of P25 Phase I. MOSWIN is tagged as being Phase II, but so far, all listed talkgroups are P25 Phase I. No idea if a change is in the works.

If you want to get a digital capable scanner, capable of handling trunked systems (including Phase II), I would suggest looking at the Uniden 325P2 or 996P2 at a minimum. Or, one of the Whistler database scanners (WS1088, WS1098, TRX-1 or TRX-2; the older WS1080 and WS1095 are the previous models of the WS1088 & WS1098, the difference being that the 1088 & 1098 have keypads, whereas the 1080 and 1095 do not.)

You might want to keep your eyes open on the classifieds here on RadioReference, as well as eBay & other outlets for a good condition pre-owned scanner (don't overlook pawn shops as well as the occasional estate or garage sale, where units generally are sold at a reduced price).
Thanks for this info. Right now the stuff in the 854.000 to 858.000 is about the only thing that I'm picking up. I still have all of the old frequencies from back in the day programmed in and after looking at the database on here, a lot of the frequencies are still the same but the systems must be different.
 

wbloss

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I am in Joplin and there are a dozen or so of us in a Facebook Scanner group if you want some close connections. There is a DMR system in Granby, so the SDS is a good bet. I hear all the Lawrence Co stuff and most of the muni's here in Jolin. Let me know if you want to join the FB group.
 
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