How can someone be a director, producer, and actor all in the same show?

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RedPenguin

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In my shows, like Dragnet, I see that Jack Webb seems to be the star, director, and producer.

I can kinda see being the producer and an actor in the show, but since the director normally is off stage, how can you be a director and an actor in the same show?

I mean if Jack Webb is playing Joe Friday for the show, how could he say cut or sit in the director's chair?

Or are directors not really like how they show them on TV sitting in a chair with either Director or their name on it?

The only show I can think off hand that does this is Dragnet and Jack Webb. I bet there are other examples, but this is the only example I can think of.

As you can tell by my other posts, I'm a Dragnet (even the radio shows), Adam-12, and just flat out Jack Webb fan, LoL.
 

LEH

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There are numerous cases of actor being director and producer. Clint Eastwood jumps immediatel to mind. John Wayne produced and starred in many of his films. Alan Alda directed numerous episodes of MASH and the list goes on.

Now one being all three is a bit rarer. The producer being the money behind the scenes.
 

Utah_Viper

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In circumstances where this happens the Asst. Director or Producers will take the scene. When the filming has stopped then the Actor can switch back to his Director job and review the scene.
 

gmclam

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Producer/Director/Actor

The producer is the brains; they decide what a show is going to look like. They may have assistants, but the producer is pretty much the head honcho of a project. The work of a producer is done before a production.

The director can take on one of many flavors depending on if it is film, live TV, or something else. The director's job is to carry out the producer's wishes. If this is the same person, it often makes it easier.

Dragnet was hardly a "live" show or shot as a live show; it is filmed and edited. During the filming stage the director can be an actor as they direct others before each take (as well as themselves). They'll have a good feeling as to whether or not a take/scene went as they want.

Then there is editing. The director will decide which take of a specific scene is to be used, or perhaps which pieces of several takes are to be assembled together. They do not do the physical job of splicing film or pressing buttons on machinery (that's the editors job), but they call the action/direction.

I hope this clears it up.
 

LEH

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kb2vxa said:
"John Wayne produced and starred in many of his films."

He owned the whole movie company, Republic Pictures.
Hate to argue with you Wayne, I got this from Wikipedia.

As the demand and market for B-pictures declined, Republic began to cut back, slowing production from forty features annually in the early 1950s to about eighteen in 1957. A tearful Herbert Yates informed shareholders at the 1958 annual meeting that feature-film production was ending; the distribution offices were shut down the following year. In the early 1960s, Republic sold its library of films to National Telefilm Associates (NTA). Having used the studio for series production for years, CBS bought Republic's studio lot; today it is known as CBS Studio Center, and in 2006 became home to the network's Los Angeles stations, KCBS and KCAL.​

The Duke did a lot of movies for Republic in his days.

The production company the Duke owned was Batjac.
 

RedPenguin

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Thank You

gmclam said:
The producer is the brains; they decide what a show is going to look like. They may have assistants, but the producer is pretty much the head honcho of a project. The work of a producer is done before a production.

The director can take on one of many flavors depending on if it is film, live TV, or something else. The director's job is to carry out the producer's wishes. If this is the same person, it often makes it easier.

Dragnet was hardly a "live" show or shot as a live show; it is filmed and edited. During the filming stage the director can be an actor as they direct others before each take (as well as themselves). They'll have a good feeling as to whether or not a take/scene went as they want.

Then there is editing. The director will decide which take of a specific scene is to be used, or perhaps which pieces of several takes are to be assembled together. They do not do the physical job of splicing film or pressing buttons on machinery (that's the editors job), but they call the action/direction.

I hope this clears it up.
Thank You, this makes the most sense to me. It really clears up who does what in a production.
 

Zaratsu

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Magic.


Jack Webb had it first. Then Chuck Norris took it from him when Jack Webb as slain in a duel between the two in 1975.

Upon his autopsy, it was discovered that Jack Webb's lungs were virtually new despite smoking since he was 7.



Jack Webb: The NEW Chuck Norris.
 

Sownman

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Actors rarely have anything to do with being a producer in TV. They usually are barely smart enough to remember a couple lines. When they get producer credit its for extra $ compensation. In features it's different. Actors sometimes do create and control companies but they usually bankrupt themselves, or someone else.

TV Creator or Executive producer to lead actor..." I can't get you any more money for this season, but I can give you a Producer credit" This carries another salary with it. Actor may get $300,000 per episode for acting then $80,000 for producing even though they don't actually do any producer work.

In the old days it was normal to see three producer credits

Executive- The meeting, script and money guy

Producer_ The line producer who handled the details of getting a production shot.

Associate_ The coffee and donuts guy who usually ran the post shooting schedule.



Now you often see 15 producer credits, even on a 1/2 hour sitcom.

Multiple Exec Producers
Multiple Producers
Multiple Line Producers
Creative Producers
Consulting Producers


It's really absurd
 

gmclam

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Producers

Sownman said:
In the old days it was normal to see three producer credits
Executive- The meeting, script and money guy
This is the person who owns the company or the head honcho that collects the largest salary. Rarely the person who does the work.

Producer- The line producer who handled the details of getting a production shot.
This is the person who does most of the work of being a producer.

Associate- The coffee and donuts guy who usually ran the post shooting schedule.
There can be several people with this credit, each doing some small part such as mentioned.
 

Zaratsu

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If Jack Webb was a real L.A. Cop. He would be the entire L.A. Police Department.


Chief
Asst Chief
All the captains, sgts, lts, and officers including detectives, vice, narco, etc.

He would also be his own partner. Jack Webb as Frank Drebbin, and Jack Webb as Frank Drebbin's wife, Maude.
 

RedPenguin

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Yes....

DanTSX said:
If Jack Webb was a real L.A. Cop. He would be the entire L.A. Police Department.


Chief
Asst Chief
All the captains, sgts, lts, and officers including detectives, vice, narco, etc.

He would also be his own partner. Jack Webb as Frank Drebbin, and Jack Webb as Frank Drebbin's wife, Maude.
That's what I always tend to joke about, because he sure as hell moved around from various departments. He can be robbery one ep, then homicide another, then move back to robbery. LoL.

I don't think I've ever heard of any real cop that actually moved around that much. LoL.
 

Zaratsu

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RedPenguin said:
That's what I always tend to joke about, because he sure as hell moved around from various departments. He can be robbery one ep, then homicide another, then move back to robbery. LoL.

I don't think I've ever heard of any real cop that actually moved around that much. LoL.

Hah, dont forget K-9 unit too:cool: No, really! he would be the handler AND the dog. Jack Webb sniffing the trail of a prison escapee out! I could see that!

To be honest. Jack Webb was Patient #1 of the Whacker disease. But in a wierd respectable Ward Cleaver way. I picture him with a vest and house slippers and pipe reading the paper asking his stereotypical 1950s housewife to bring him a gin and tonic while he listens to the old Realistic Patrolman Crystal scanner and the kids in Davey Crocket hats watch westerns or some crap about sputnik on the RCA console TV. He hears a call on the patrolman for a robbery in progress, jumps up out of his doiley-covered seat, rushes out to the belvedere, biscayne, or fairlane or whatever in the driveway, sets the single gumball on the roof and turns a hand-cranked WWII surpluss airraid siren. Then the sceane cuts to him with a stereotypical "bandit" with an eye-mask with a canvas bag with a "$" sign printed on it, in his hand.

Then he gets an award at the next Elks club meeting or something.

The entire time he has his pipe/slippers/vest on!:cool:



Can you see this in your head??? I can! Like i've already seen a rerun of it on nick at night right after the talking horse show. Jack Webb Indeed! The 50s were kickin rad!:)
 

LEH

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DanTSX said:
Hah, dont forget K-9 unit too:cool: No, really! he would be the handler AND the dog.
Actually in on episode of Dragnet, Friday, working out of vice, did work with one of the first K-9 drug dogs to find the stash hidden behind the light switch. Actually showed the effort taken to show several judges the dog could find the drugs and have the search/seisure stand up in court. One of the judges even brought his own stash to verify the test wasn't rigged. :D
 
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