• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

How does a GMRS repeater extend the transmit of of a mobile?

Status
Not open for further replies.

mwvernon

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
7
I am looking into building a portable GMRS repeater. My question is that if my 5 watt UHF radio isnt powerful enough to transmit to the secondary radio how will a repeater help? Isn't a repeater limited by how far the handheld can transmit?

Thanks
 

Rt169Radio

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Aug 24, 2011
Messages
2,811
Location
CT
If a radio transmit signal (say from a handheld) can reach the repeater,the repeater rebroadcasts that signal again on a higher transmit power.
 

mwvernon

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
7
So then that means if you only have a 5 watt handheld does it make sense to have a 50 watt repeater?
 

mwvernon

Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2012
Messages
7
Maybe if i explain my situation you will be able to help better.

I have (6) 4 Watt i believe GMRS radios that friends and i have for community service events we help out with. We all have our GRMS licenses from the FCC. I am looking to build a portable repeater system to extend the transmit and receive distance. Does it make sense for me to spend the extra money on a 50 watt repeater if only after say 2 miles it will become a 1 way communication device?

I understand that if person A is standing near the repeater person B will be able to hear him. But if person B is 3 miles away he cant talk back. Correct?
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
13,496
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
Let say you and a friend are out in the woods. You can reliably communicate using your own voices and ears up to 200 feet apart. That would be similar to how simplex radio works. Your radio can only transmit so far to the other radio.

Now, bring in a third friend. Have him stand where friend 2 was, and now have friend two walk another 200 feet away. You can now talk to friend 3, 200 feet away from you, and he, in turn, can talk to the other friend who is now a total of 400 feet from you.

Now put said friend on a mountain top with a hearing aid and a mega phone. Sorta a simple explanation about how a repeater works.

The limitations of your mobile or handheld radio are:
Limited transit power.
Limited gan antenna.
Limited range due to topographical shielding (fancy way of saying "there is a dang mountain in my way)

While it may be difficult to talk to a radio 5 miles away due to the above limitations, it is a lot easier for your radio to be heard from a mountain top, from the top of a tall building, or the top of a tall tower.

The repeater can run a larger antenna with more gain (able to hear quieter signals)
The repeater can run more power (Can yell louder)
The repeater is on top of a hill, so it can "see" over the mountain that is in your way. (can yell around corners)


The repeater also breaks down at the least opportune time, usually in the rain or snow, and almost always in the middle of the night. You will rarely have the correct part in your truck, but that's a discussion for another time...
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top