I am working on the a disaster Frequency Spread Sheet

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SCPD

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Hi Happy Holidays ,

I am working on a Spread Sheet for Disaster Frequencies. Please let me know if you have any and also another question What is the frequency for Search and Rescue In Central Virginia.
 

SCPD

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Hi Happy Holidays ,

I am working on a Spread Sheet for Disaster Frequencies. Please let me know if you have any and also another question What is the frequency for Search and Rescue In Central Virginia.
 

cmjonesinc

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It depends on your definition of "disaster" really. Small scale or large is going to make the frequencies in use vary widely. A local disaster will likely have local channels and possibly some state channels. Lots of time the generic incident channels use the same frequencies all over the US and it varys area to area. A place to start is here RadioReference.com - Scanner Frequencies and Radio Frequency Reference Database depending on the disaster you could have anything from national interagency fire to just normal interoperability frequencies, red cross, mixed in what local frequencies. It's very hard to have a complete list of everything that would be used for a disaster. Your best bet is when a disaster happens use what you have and also do some scanning in the common bands.
 
D

DaveNF2G

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If your list is for Virginia frequencies, then you should post your query in the Virginia Forum.

Now that you have already posted here, and cross-posting is against the rules, you should use the Report icon on your message to ask a Moderator to move it.
 

Rred

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"I am talking about any disaster"
They will all be managed these days under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) in accord with federal guidelines. Because no one wants to pay for local disasters, and FEMA will not release a cent unless NIMS/ICS guidelines are followed and the correct paperwork is turned in. (They'll release funds, but they'll take them back if the paperwork doesn't pass review.)
So under ICS the first responder on the scene becomes the Incident Commander, and the communications will be whatever they have at hand. That may be whistles, police radios, DPW radios, fire department radios, VHF, UHF low or high band, cell phones...ANYTHING. The Incident Commander stays in charge of the response until someone more senior and capable can be found or shows up, and then command changes hands. Communications will also change, as a formal response structure is set up and a COMMS team can be put in place.
Incident command and communications may also be switched to military resources now. Not just National Guard, but full active military resources. That hasn't happened yet but has been authorized since 2006 under special executive order, after Mr. Bush had to be told why he couldn't send the Army into New Orleans after Katrina.

So, you may want to familiarize yourself with NIMS and ICS. Heavy reading but free on the web. And then you would need a list of every potential "responder" in your area, from the local dog catcher to the closest military bases. There are no "universal" communications, not actually deployed, not yet. It is still very much a hodge-podge of legacy equipment and new gear.
 

Rred

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SAR would be with the disaster response teams. The "Relief" teams come in after the response, generally. No? Or does the OP want it all from start to finish?
 

BoxAlarm187

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SAR would be with the disaster response teams. The "Relief" teams come in after the response, generally. No? Or does the OP want it all from start to finish?
Virginia uses dedicated SAR teams that are a deployable asset from the state's EOC.
 

Rred

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Under NIMS, almost anything can be a "resource" which will be found and listed in a resource catalogue. Bulldozers, SAR teams, paymasters, firefighting aircraft...anyone or anything you might "need" is listed as a resource or sub-type. So it makes very good sense for states to follow the same structure, allowing resources to be federalized, or itemized and billed on the same basis as the other FEMA resources. Somewhere online, that's another 600 page (?) book, that keeps growing every time someone says something like "Who do we call to service the port-o-sans?"

It sounds a bit, ah, compulsive to insist everything is done that way, but when something BIG happens, it becomes a very good thing when you find out there's a thousand other strangers deployed with you, and you ALL know how to play the same game with the same rule book. (And an incident that required only a thousand responders, still wouldn't even be close to REALLY BIG, even if the wildfires have been pushing that scale.)
 

ecps92

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If someone wants to really understand and digest the NIMS and ICS concepts
don't rely on the Web/Google :cool:

FEMA has FREE (Yes, use your Tax Dollars) On-Line Training programs, that YES even the Citizens of the US can take at
https://training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx?all=true

Plenty of good, reliable information.

"I am talking about any disaster"
They will all be managed these days under the National Incident Management System (NIMS) and the Incident Command System (ICS) in accord with federal guidelines. Because no one wants to pay for local disasters, and FEMA will not release a cent unless NIMS/ICS guidelines are followed and the correct paperwork is turned in. (They'll release funds, but they'll take them back if the paperwork doesn't pass review.)
So under ICS the first responder on the scene becomes the Incident Commander, and the communications will be whatever they have at hand. That may be whistles, police radios, DPW radios, fire department radios, VHF, UHF low or high band, cell phones...ANYTHING. The Incident Commander stays in charge of the response until someone more senior and capable can be found or shows up, and then command changes hands. Communications will also change, as a formal response structure is set up and a COMMS team can be put in place.
Incident command and communications may also be switched to military resources now. Not just National Guard, but full active military resources. That hasn't happened yet but has been authorized since 2006 under special executive order, after Mr. Bush had to be told why he couldn't send the Army into New Orleans after Katrina.

So, you may want to familiarize yourself with NIMS and ICS. Heavy reading but free on the web. And then you would need a list of every potential "responder" in your area, from the local dog catcher to the closest military bases. There are no "universal" communications, not actually deployed, not yet. It is still very much a hodge-podge of legacy equipment and new gear.
 

Rred

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Bill?
"If someone wants to really understand and digest the NIMS and ICS concepts
don't rely on the Web/Google

FEMA has FREE ...at
https://training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx?all=true "

Ergh, yes. That FEMA URL is a WEB site. You're relying on the "web" to get you there. And, Google and the Wikipedia will both send you there, if you ask the right questions.

Now, if you had the IP address of that FEMA page, that would get you past the web (which is only a part of the internet) and Google.I suspect a local reference librarian could also access the hard copies which the USGPO has distributed for public reference, too.(G)
 

ecps92

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:roll: symantics :roll:

Go to the Source aka FEMA.gov
Don't Rely on Non Official Web Sources found via Google.

:D Now it's spelled out Clearly ;)

We now return you to your existing digital communications

Bill?
"If someone wants to really understand and digest the NIMS and ICS concepts
don't rely on the Web/Google

FEMA has FREE ...at
https://training.fema.gov/is/crslist.aspx?all=true "

Ergh, yes. That FEMA URL is a WEB site. You're relying on the "web" to get you there. And, Google and the Wikipedia will both send you there, if you ask the right questions.

Now, if you had the IP address of that FEMA page, that would get you past the web (which is only a part of the internet) and Google.I suspect a local reference librarian could also access the hard copies which the USGPO has distributed for public reference, too.(G)
 

Rred

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No, Bill. What I was saying is that FEMA "site" is a web page server, not just an internet server. Many agencies and corporations still have a dedicated internet server accessed by "domain.name" and a second server accessed by "www.domain.name" which is their web server. Which, incidentally, means that when someone doesn't use the http://www. prefix, they hit the domain name servers twice to resolve the name, doubling the load on those eight expensive machines that keep getting hit by DDOS attacks.

Which, incidentally, makes the "web" a far more fragile place than the "internet". The internet was built to keep running after a nuclear holocaust. The "web" was never designed to the same criteria, it just piggybacks kinda blindly. When the domain name servers are inaccessible, I can type an IP address and get through to an internet server directly. But, someone using a "web" address? Is dead in the water.

Not just semantics. There are differences.
 
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