I have an ICOM-R75 and would like to operate it via a Windows 10 PC

Compumind

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Oct 27, 2020
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Hi there!

I have an ICOM R-75 and would like to control it from a Windows 10 PC, preferably with some frequency Scanning functions to enhance it's use.
Exactly what hardware and software (preferably free) that can help me achieve this?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

TIA

:)
 

majoco

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Does the R75 have the CI-V remote socket like my R7000? The only programme that I found that was available for the R7000 was called "CI-V commander" but you will need to buy/build an interface. It does scan a bank of 10 frequencies out of 100 stored but there is no 'stop-on-signal' function. IMHO the programme and Win 10 are probably incompatible anyway - I had to go right back to Win XP to make it work!
 

kruser

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Does the R75 have the CI-V remote socket like my R7000? The only programme that I found that was available for the R7000 was called "CI-V commander" but you will need to buy/build an interface. It does scan a bank of 10 frequencies out of 100 stored but there is no 'stop-on-signal' function. IMHO the programme and Win 10 are probably incompatible anyway - I had to go right back to Win XP to make it work!
My R75 has an actual serial port with a female DB9 socket and the typical CI-V mono 1/8th in jack.
I've only ever programmed its memories through the serial port interface but control worked through both ports.

I used a program called SysLabs RadioControl with the CI-V and DB9 Serial ports before. Both worked equally well for control.
I've never really looked for any other software programs for controlling the R75.

I already had SysLabs program mainly for reading and writing the memories in my R9000 and R7000 receivers as there's also not much out there for those models either. It just so happened to also support the R75 so I gave it a try and it worked fine.
The SysLabs website was dead the last time I'd checked a year or so back but it's online now at https://www.radioctl.com/en/index.html so it looks like the software is still being supported and hopefully updated.

I also still use a memory management program for my R75 called R75 Programmer from Guindasoft but it may no longer be available either.
It was a very basic memory management program for the R75. I'm pretty sure it was freeware. A word of caution with this one though, I'm pretty sure the Upload and Download buttons work in reverse of how most memory managers work today. So a Download may actually write to the R75 instead of reading from it. If anyone uses it, I'd try it first with just a few memories so you don't wipe out all your memories!
I like the more sensible "Read From Radio" and "Write To Radio" labels a bit better! The use of Download and Upload can and are interpreted different ways depending on which way you are looking at things in your mind.
I've always used my computer as the device so when I "Download", it means I'm saving data on my computer and when I "Upload" something, it's going From my computer to an external target device.

As to Windows 10, the SysLabs website says their software will run under Win 10. I've only run it on Win 7 64 bit.
The SysLabs site says the software is a 32bit application and I saw no mention of a 64 bit version but that part was not important for me when I'd purchased it.
SysLabs program does use a USB Hardware Key that must be inserted before the program will run. The hardware key uses software drivers for the device called a "Sentinel Hardlock Key" from a company called SafeNet with the drivers dated in 2016.
I've seen this same USB hardware key dongle used for copy protection on other expensive software packages so I think it's pretty well supported across different OS platforms or versions, including Win 10.
I bought my copy of SysLabs Pro software years ago now so it may be possible the USB hardware key may no longer be needed.

SysLabs software supports a decent amount of radios from various manufacturers for both receivers and transceivers so it may be nice for those who are licensed amateur operators as well. It can transfer memory contents from one type radio to another as well but I don't know how much user intervention may be needed to add or strip data that may not be compatible between different models. I've only done such between the R7000 and R9000 receivers. It can also support dual VFO models for some radios. I think the troublesome Yaesu VR-5000 allowed support for its dual VFO's but it's been ages since I've turned my VR-5000 on.

While on this control subject of this thread for the R75, I'm also open to trying other software programs for controlling and managing memory of the Icom IC-R75 receiver so please post any links or info if anyone has any suggestions.

I could be mistaken but I thought I recall reading that some of the amateur radio based control programs like Ham Radio Deluxe also had the R75 in their database or options as a supported radio for control. I kind of remember trying one that did control but not memory management so I never used it but that could have been for the R7000 or R9000 also.

SysLabs software does allow for decent control of the R75, even for more obscure things like switching between the available antenna inputs, preamp settings, filters and so on. Probably some things are not available but most of the R75's front panel buttons seemed to be supported.
Signal strength is also supported from the R75 so you can use the software for scanning functions.
I've not used my copy of SysLabs software for quite some time now but I do recall very well that is was very flexible in what it could do.
It had some unique features if I recall correctly that are not usually found in other applications.
 

ka3jjz

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A couple of notes - tk75 and TRX Manager are no longer supported (at least for the public) but are listed for historical reference. The groups.io group and/or Facebook group may have more that is not listed here...Mike
 
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