I picked up Timmys :)

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joneil2000

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Still pretty new to scanning, but here's one I never had before. I was in the south end of London (ON) on Wellington road this morning, and I picked up the local Tim Hortons, specifically the drive though orders, on my 346XT. The frequency showing on the display was 461.0125.

I was able to hear it for about a block away before it faded out. Anybody else pick up the local Timmys?
 

pathalogical

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Drive thrus can be fun to listen to. As already mentioned, they are low power, so best bet is park in the lot so you can watch and listen to the many indecisive people who have absolutley no clue what they want to order. Check TAFL by entering the drive thru of choice.
 

gary123

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is the freq a common for the timmies
yes it is. I am aware of severl locations using this freq. They often use different PL tones.

I have found that close call is pretty usless for picking up drive throughs, but a search of 902-928 WFM will find lots of others. I have logged all the local drivethroughs for my local city.

Other drivethroughs to look for are McDonalds, A&W,KFC/Taco Bell, Williams and DQ. I have found that TAFL is not the best source for info as often a location will change "channels" whan enough headsets get broken.
 

nova1010

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And Burger King close to me uses 902.300MHZ very boring to listen to though.

BING BONG "Welcome to burger king may I help you" ZZZZZZZZZZZZZZ
 

terrygibson

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Apr 20, 2010
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St. Thomas Ontario Tim Hortons

The Tim Hortons location on Talbot Street west in St. Thomas Ontario uses 469.0125, audible for about one block. I have to agree with the ZZZZZ factor when it comes to drive-through monitoring, how many times do you want to listen to people ordering "double doubles"?
 
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