• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

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    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

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ICOM & Kenwood NEXEDGE

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SpannerWrench

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Is the ICOM IC-V82 capable of being programmed for a system built around the Kenwood NEXEDGE digital technology? Thanks for any assistance.
 

SCPD

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iDAS is really useless in America as well, it is a European flavor of Digital for European iCOM Commercial radio's. Its Europe's P25 equivalent. (Least that is how it was explained to me)

If its iCOM Amateur it's likely DTARS, as NEXTEDGE is a Business Application for Professional 2-way radio and not an adopted voice of Amateur Radio.
 

n1das

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NOPE= IDAS is for commercial two way radios
iDAS & NEXEDGE can be used in Amateur Radio. 100% legal. It meets the criteria like D-STAR and P25 does.

iDAS = iCom Digital Advanced System
NEXEDGE = Kenwood's version of Icom's iDAS.

iDAS and NEXEDGE are compatible in 6.25k conventional mode only. The trunking formats are different for each and with a trunked system you get locked into a manufacturer (Icom or Kenwood). Kenwood also offers 12.5k NEXEDGE as a transition step towards 6.25k digital and to help lock customers into using Kenwood radios.

The iDAS / NEXEDGE digital audio blows P25 away. The equipment cost is about 1/3 the cost of P25 gear and only slightly more expensive than analog-only radios. They will get cheaper eventually. That also puts it less expensive than D-STAR too. And unlike a D-STAR repeater, an iDAS or NEXEDGE repeater in conventional mode supports mixed analog and digital mode operation to preserve backward compatibility for analog-only users.

(Also notice there is no "T" in the spelling of NEXEDGE.)
 
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n1das

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iDAS is really useless in America as well, it is a European flavor of Digital for European iCOM Commercial radio's. Its Europe's P25 equivalent. (Least that is how it was explained to me)

If its iCOM Amateur it's likely DTARS, as NEXTEDGE is a Business Application for Professional 2-way radio and not an adopted voice of Amateur Radio.
It's not useless and it's already here. I'm already using it. When the FCC's future narrowbanding requirements kick in for commercial users, iDAS and NEXEDGE systems will be in use in the USA. The radio manufactureres have claimed they can't meet the future 6.25k narrowbanding requirements in analog. The future 6.25k stuff will be digital only.
 
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n1das

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Is the ICOM IC-V82 capable of being programmed for a system built around the Kenwood NEXEDGE digital technology? Thanks for any assistance.
I'm not real familiar with the V82 but I believe it can take an option board to add D-STAR capability. The iDAS digital board that goes in Icom's iDAS commercial gear *MIGHT* fit in there but I doubt it would work. I suspect the radio would need a firmware upgrade to be able to use the iDAS board.

Like others have said I think your only digital option for the V82 is D-STAR.

Good luck.
 

citylink_uk

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iDAS is really useless in America as well, it is a European flavor of Digital for European iCOM Commercial radio's. Its Europe's P25 equivalent. (Least that is how it was explained to me)

If its iCOM Amateur it's likely DTARS, as NEXTEDGE is a Business Application for Professional 2-way radio and not an adopted voice of Amateur Radio.
DMR is NOT europes answer to P25, and is certainly not 'useless' to america.

P25 was designed for Public Safety in the USA.
TETRA is the Public Safety standard in Europe.

It might have been formed by a European working group, but DMR is the standard for commercial digital radio worldwide.

Two flavours:

FDMA: Kenwood NEXEDGE and Icom are interoperable in conventional mode.

TDMA: The aim is also for interoperability between the other members who have chosen to use the more spectrally efficient TDMA instead, such as Motorola(TRBO), Vertex, Tait and HYT.

No matter where you are in the world, DMR will be sold as the standard for those manufacturers part of the working group.
 

radiofan1

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TDMA: The aim is also for interoperability between the other members who have chosen to use the more spectrally efficient TDMA instead, such as Motorola(TRBO), Vertex, Tait and HYT.
You're saying 2 slot tdma 12.5 KHz is more spectrally efficient then fdma 6.25KHz? Please elaborate on how you figure this.

Sounds like (more than) a little bias there, friend.
 

n1das

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You're saying 2 slot tdma 12.5 KHz is more spectrally efficient then fdma 6.25KHz? Please elaborate on how you figure this.

Sounds like (more than) a little bias there, friend.
Motorola is claiming "6.25kHz equivalent efficiency" but they are still using a 12.5kHz channel. Even when only one time slot in MotoTRBO's 2-slot TDMA system is in use, the other timeslot is wasted and entire 12.5kHz channel bandwidth is still used.

The 12.5kHz/6.25kHz designations are a slight misnomber because they actually refer to the channel spacing and not the bandwidth used...the occupied bandwidth of each is narrower than the channel spacing. IIRC, Kenwood NEXEDGE in 12.5k mode has an occupied BW of around 8kHz. In Kenwood NEXEDGE and Icom iDAS 6.25k mode it is 4 kHz.

Icom has a good whitepaper on the talking points of iDAS/NEXEDGE vs. MotoTRBO's 2-slot TDMA.
http://nxdn.mygmrs.com/downloads/nxdn/fdma_info.pdf

More iDAS information:
http://www.idas625.com/
 
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citylink_uk

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You're saying 2 slot tdma 12.5 KHz is more spectrally efficient then fdma 6.25KHz? Please elaborate on how you figure this.

Sounds like (more than) a little bias there, friend.
Sorry, I was putting it in the context of our current 12.5KHz channel allocations, not US ones. No 6.25Khz channels available here yet.

Kenwood and Icom offer their own trunking system's but there's little chance of competition or co-operation between manufacturers.

A new age MPT1327 is what we're hoping for. An open standard which allows interoperable equipment from multiple manufacturers with big scope for third party customisation.

No intended bias, it's just my opinion. I accept that others may disagree.
 
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bradlington

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A new age MPT1327 is what we're hoping for. An open standard which allows interoperable equipment from multiple manufacturers with big scope for third party customisation.

The MPT1327 is an open platform and the MPT1352 is one of the conforming specs for radio manuafacturers.
This is why it has taken off as the better PMR Trunking as far as price goes.

Any manuafacturer that has a MPT1327 product has to conform to that spec so a mixed of manufacturers can be used.

We have used Kenwood ,Tait ,Motorola ,Kavicomm ,QD all together in same groups with no problem.
 
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