Icom mod to transmit?

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smittyj77

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I have been doing some reading up on radios, and I see that there is a mod that you can transmit on all frequencies, now is this true, Maybe I dont quire understand how this is supposed to work, but for a volunteer fireman for example could he transmit and recive on the fire dispatch frequencie? Also does certain icom radios act like a scanner as well?

Sorry for the dum questions, Im just curious and thinking about getting into amateur radio.

Thanks
 

rdale

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Yes he could - but it would be illegal since that gear isn't made for commercial transmissions.
 

prcguy

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Legal to mod anything, illegal to use on bands where not type accepted. So, you could generally modify and use anything to operate in the amateur bands as long as the harmonic and spurious emissions are below a certain level but to transmit with a modified amateur radio on commercial, police, fire, marine, etc would not be allowed except in extreme emergency.
prcguy

I have been doing some reading up on radios, and I see that there is a mod that you can transmit on all frequencies, now is this true, Maybe I dont quire understand how this is supposed to work, but for a volunteer fireman for example could he transmit and recive on the fire dispatch frequencie? Also does certain icom radios act like a scanner as well?

Sorry for the dum questions, Im just curious and thinking about getting into amateur radio.

Thanks
 

stevelton

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Also

Please keep in mind that, while it is not currently illegal to mod a transmitter, once it has been modded, then it has the ability to transmit. If you now program in a frequency outside the hamband, it now has the ability to transmit on those frequencies. Having a radio programmed with frequencies that is able to be transmitted on, and you dont have the proper authority to transmit on those frequencies, that is a violation of part 90 rules. If you need the exact rule number, I can look it up and post it here.
Even if you dont transmit on a modded radio, you still cant have the transmit frequncies in a radio unless you have the proper authority to transmit on them. But even if you have the proper authority, you still cannot use moddified ham radios outside the ham bands.
If you were caught using them, on say, the fire channel, then not only could you get a big fine, but the fire dept. could possibly lose its license, which Im sure would make any chief VERY mad, and a county board with lots of questions.
Steven
 
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Please keep in mind that, while it is not currently illegal to mod a transmitter, once it has been modded, then it has the ability to transmit. If you now program in a frequency outside the hamband, it now has the ability to transmit on those frequencies. Having a radio programmed with frequencies that is able to be transmitted on, and you dont have the proper authority to transmit on those frequencies, that is a violation of part 90 rules. If you need the exact rule number, I can look it up and post it here.

Steven
Hit me with that exact number, better yet post the actual law.

On most if not all amateur radio transceivers you can simply select the frequency you want to operate on and key up (if your rig can transmit on the freq you do so if not it usually displays an error message). I guess that's not "programmed" so it might fall outside the law you're quoting. Say you had a MARS modded HT and had a bank with the frs channels programmed into it? All you use than bank for is to scan the channels but because you could transmit on those freq's then it would be illegal?

Sounds like BS to me.
 

N8IAA

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I have been doing some reading up on radios, and I see that there is a mod that you can transmit on all frequencies, now is this true, Maybe I dont quire understand how this is supposed to work, but for a volunteer fireman for example could he transmit and recive on the fire dispatch frequencie? Also does certain icom radios act like a scanner as well? Sorry for the dum questions, Im just curious and thinking about getting into amateur radio.Thanks
The ideal choice would be to get a commercial Icom, or, Kenwood, etc. transceiver that can be programmed in the 2m or 73cm band. Then get the FD frequencies programmed in by the tech at work. That way, you are legal on ham and legal on the FD frequencies. And , they scan. Or, just use the ham radio to listen to your fire frequency and what ever else you want to scan. Not a dumb question at all. I use all of my ham gear as conventional scanners. Just do it a way that won't cause legal problems for you or your FD.
Larry
 
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N_Jay

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Hit me with that exact number, better yet post the actual law.

On most if not all amateur radio transceivers you can simply select the frequency you want to operate on and key up (if your rig can transmit on the freq you do so if not it usually displays an error message). I guess that's not "programmed" so it might fall outside the law you're quoting. Say you had a MARS modded HT and had a bank with the frs channels programmed into it? All you use than bank for is to scan the channels but because you could transmit on those freq's then it would be illegal?

Sounds like BS to me.
Section 90.427(b) of the Rules states "[e]xcept for frequencies used
in accordance with S: 90.417, no person shall program into a
transmitter frequencies for which the licensee using the transmitter
is not authorized."

That exact enough for you?
 
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k8tmk

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There is no reason to modify an amateur transmitter to transmit out of band. So, just don't do it.

Here's the common scenerio:

1. You program a public safety frequency into your transmitter.

2. If the public service uses a repeater, chances are that it uses a PL tone. Now you find out what the PL tone is and program it in.

3. To make sure it works, you key up the public service repeater (a violation).

4. Next, you have to show a friend that your radio can key up the public service repeater (another violation).

Yeh, I know. You wouldn't do any of this. Just like people who have a radar detector because they want to know when they are being watched, not so they can speed. Sure.

Randy
 

kb2vxa

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Never mind the FCC when the cops alone can make your life miserable. A ham rig capable of receiving public service frequencies is perfectly legal under federal preemptive law but things can get sticky under state scanner laws when those frequencies are programmed. Preemption only covers capability, not usage, so even if the VFO is sitting on a police channel you're screwed. Now what do you think would happen should you get caught with one that TRANSMITS on those frequencies???
 

N0IU

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...a volunteer fireman for example could he transmit and recive on the fire dispatch frequencie?
If you are a volunteer firefighter and your chief tells you to buy your own radio gear and have it modified for their frequency, you may not want to work for that department. What's next... supply your own hoses???
 
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Section 90.427(b) of the Rules states "[e]xcept for frequencies used
in accordance with S: 90.417, no person shall program into a
transmitter frequencies for which the licensee using the transmitter
is not authorized."

That exact enough for you?
Yes perfect, I had never heard of that one before. Thanks for posting it.

It doesn't say anything about having the ability to tx on those frequencies or not. Apparently programming the local public safety frequencies into a bank of a radio that can't even transmit on those frequencies is a violation as well. The radio is a transmitter and you programed in frequencies that you're not licensed to use. So now I can't use any of my HAM gear to listen to public safety?

Not trying to stir the kettle here, just trying to understand the ridiculous rules the FCC has in place. Look at blocking the cellular band if you need an example of just how stupid these bureaucrats can be.
 
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N_Jay

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The cellular blocking was more about the stupid congress then the FCC.
The programming rule (I believe) is applied more to shops than individuals.
Just program the channels as RX only, since TX is illegal even with permission from the licensee.

I would love to know if this law has EVER been used against a ham (other the a blatant act)?
 

N0IU

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(Emphasis added by me)

It doesn't say anything about having the ability to tx on those frequencies or not. Apparently programming the local public safety frequencies into a bank of a radio that can't even transmit on those frequencies is a violation as well. The radio is a transmitter and you programed in frequencies that you're not licensed to use. So now I can't use any of my HAM gear to LISTEN to public safety?
Yeah, that learning to read thing can come in handy from time to time.

The law says:
Section 90.427(b) of the Rules states "[e]xcept for frequencies used in accordance with S: 90.417, no person shall program INTO A TRANSMITTER frequencies for which the licensee using the transmitter is not authorized."
The law does not say anything about programming frequencies into a receiver... ONLY A TRANSMITTER. In other words, you can not program your radio to transmit on non-amateur frequencies, but you can use you amateur equipment to receive anything (that is not blocked by federal law) from DC to daylight.
 
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(Emphasis added by me)



Yeah, that learning to read thing can come in handy from time to time.

The law says:


The law does not say anything about programming frequencies into a receiver... ONLY A TRANSMITTER. In other words, you can not program your radio to transmit on non-amateur frequencies, but you can use you amateur equipment to receive anything (that is not blocked by federal law) from DC to daylight.
First off it's too early to be so caustic, go look at the sunrise or something and cheer up. Waking up that hostile has got to be bad for your general well being.

All of my HAM HT's are transceivers, meaning they couple a transmitter and a receiver. There are not two different interfaces or menus separating the two. What I program to receive I can also tx on if it's within a certain range. I have only checked my Yaesu VX-3 so far but I don't think there is a way to disable transmit on a programmed frequency.
 

KG4INW

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...

All of my HAM HT's are transceivers, meaning they couple a transmitter and a receiver. There are not two different interfaces or menus separating the two. What I program to receive I can also tx on if it's within a certain range. I have only checked my Yaesu VX-3 so far but I don't think there is a way to disable transmit on a programmed frequency.
True, but as they come stock from any dealer, they are wired to not transmit out of band (ham that is). So, out of band, they are receivers only and transmitting is not possible so you are not in violation to be listening to PS. Unless of course if you mod it for out of band. I see how tricky the wording is.
 
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True, but as they come stock from any dealer, they are wired to not transmit out of band (ham that is). So, out of band, they are receivers only and transmitting is not possible so you are not in violation to be listening to PS. Unless of course if you mod it for out of band. I see how tricky the wording is.
I see your point and tend to agree with you.

The law doesn't seem to take into account the fact that said transmitter can't tx on the freq, just that that freq is programmed into a transmitter.

Perhaps I'm being too literal, not going to lose any sleep over the matter, but it's good to know where one's liabilities are.
 

Citywide173

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I think you are taking it a little too literally. A transceiver is a combination of a transmitter and receiver into one unit. The fact remains that inside the casing, there is actually a transmitter and a receiver. Integral, yes, the same thing, no. When you program the frequency into your HAM radio, the public safety frequency should give an error message if you attempt to transmit on it. If one has a modified radio, the easiest way to avoid an issue on it (although other issues may be caused) is to set the TX side to as low a power as possible and put in an authorized frequency so that transmitting on the public safety frequency is not an issue. In a commercial radio, if a frequency is programmed receive only, it does not involve the transmitter in any way, only the receiver, so it is legal.
 

burner50

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Section 90.427(b) of the Rules states "[e]xcept for frequencies used
in accordance with S: 90.417, no person shall program into a
transmitter frequencies for which the licensee using the transmitter
is not authorized."

That exact enough for you?


First I have a question on the application of that law. Are ham radios covered under part 90?

I am also curious to know if that has ever been used against a ham who has not transmitted.
 

N0IU

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First off it's too early to be so caustic, go look at the sunrise or something and cheer up. Waking up that hostile has got to be bad for your general well being.
Its never too early! I work 3rd shift from 10:00pm to 7:00am so I haven't even been to bed yet!

In referring to your VX-3, it will only transmit on the 2 meter and 70 cm amateur radio bands... period. You can not "accidentally" transmit on any other frequency just because you can program it into the receiver side. There is nothing to disable to keep you from transmitting anywhere but those bands. This can be found on Page 14 of your manual... "Transmission is possible only on the 144 MHz and 430 MHz bands."
 
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zz0468

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First I have a question on the application of that law. Are ham radios covered under part 90?
No. But that is irrelevant. The rules apply to specific services and frequencies. There is no hidden loophole in the law that would allow a ham radio to be so programmed that would disallow a commercial radio to be programmed that way.

I am also curious to know if that has ever been used against a ham who has not transmitted.
I don't know about that being applied to a ham, but I have personal first hand knowledge of radios being seized as evidence in a criminal investigation, and being asked to determine if they had transmit capability with the intention of adding more charges if they did.
 
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