Idea for antenna pole?

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LtDoc

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That pole looks like it should work. What size antenna? I think I'd say a 'smaller' one until you know just how it will fair under your local weather conditions. That deals with 'wind loading' or the amount of forces exerted 'sideways'.
- 'Doc

(How secure is that fence post?)
 

Rt169Radio

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That pole looks like it should work. What size antenna? I think I'd say a 'smaller' one until you know just how it will fair under your local weather conditions. That deals with 'wind loading' or the amount of forces exerted 'sideways'.
- 'Doc

(How secure is that fence post?)
Its pretty secure,if I have any problems with it I could always move the pole somewhere else.

How do you plan to ground the antenna?
Do you really need to ground the antenna? Since this is like a temporay setup,
If there are storms in the area I could always unplug the antenna from the radio?
 

k8krh

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I use the fiberglass poles, bought off qrzdotcom from a chap in ohio, I have my inverted vee on it at 25 feet for last few years with 20 feet left over if I need to put up another antenna, works great for a light weight antenna...
DOCTOR/795
 

LtDoc

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For most commercially made antennas a ground isn't necessary except for a safety ground, not RF. Unplugging the feed line is the simplest solution, not always the best, but it's good in most instances. If you get a strike, or a near strike, simply grounding the antenna isn't going to do much good anyway. Lots of variation in that...
- 'Doc
 

Nap

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For most commercially made antennas a ground isn't necessary except for a safety ground, not RF. Unplugging the feed line is the simplest solution, not always the best, but it's good in most instances. If you get a strike, or a near strike, simply grounding the antenna isn't going to do much good anyway. Lots of variation in that...
- 'Doc
What would be the differences between using a metal and a fiberglass pole, when using a commercial VHF/UHF vertical antenna of the "stick with radials" variety (i.e. something like a Diamond X50A)? From these POVs:

1) radiation pattern changes or other effects induced by a metal pole

2) lightning (in both cases - cable connected and disconnected)

This assuming that the pole is stuck into the ground in your backyard (not attached to a roof).
 

Rt169Radio

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A safety ground is a requirement. Depending on the coax for the safety ground is a recipe for disaster.
What is a safety ground? Since the pole is fiberglass and not metal how would you ground it?
 

zz0468

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What is a safety ground? Since the pole is fiberglass and not metal how would you ground it?
A safety ground is a ground connection that exists for safety only, and serves no function in terms of antenna performance. It's an NEC requirement.

Non-conducting antenna masts are nothing new. Telephone poles have been used for years. You run a separate ground conductor from the antenna to a ground rod at the base of the pole. No big deal...
 

LtDoc

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An antenna ground is not a requirement unless local ordinance say it is. It IS a pretty good idea if your area is subject to a lot of lightning. There is no absolute 'dead-nutz sure' way of surviving a lightning strike (or a near one). You can certainly increase the chances of 'surviving' though.
- 'Doc
 
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Rt169Radio

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A safety ground is a ground connection that exists for safety only, and serves no function in terms of antenna performance. It's an NEC requirement.

Non-conducting antenna masts are nothing new. Telephone poles have been used for years. You run a separate ground conductor from the antenna to a ground rod at the base of the pole. No big deal...
Okay,I will probably get a Larsen base conversion kit and use a 2 meter mobile antenna with it.What does the grounding do for the antenna? Protect the antenna and radio from surges and RF? Now deal with me here,how exactly would you ground a antenna like this?

Larsen BSAKIT Base Conversion Kit
 
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jhooten

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An antenna ground is not a requirement unless local ordinance say it is.
- 'Doc
Unless you consider NFPA 70 a local ordinance this is not correct.

From eHow

"All outside receiving antennas, such as those used for TV, must be grounded according to the National Electrical Code (NEC) Article 810 Section 21. Grounding an outdoor antenna not only protects the structure and equipment the antenna is servicing, but improves the reception of broadcast signals. High voltage from errant lighting strikes can damage or destroy equipment and cause "
 

zz0468

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Okay,I will probably get a Larsen base conversion kit and use a 2 meter mobile antenna with it.What does the grounding do for the antenna?
It does nothing for the antenna.

What it does is route any static charge building up on the antenna to ground, and diverts any lightning hits to ground, rather than through the front end of your radio, and then to ground. By itself, the ground connection isn't likely to save your radio, but it is likely to prevent a fire as all that energy finds it's way to ground via flammable construction materials such as wood.

Protect the antenna and radio from surges and RF?
No, not so much.

Now deal with me here,how exactly would you ground a antenna like this?
You run a separate ground conductor, bonded to the metal mount, down the mast, to a ground rod at the base of the mast.
 

LtDoc

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jhooten,
Believe it or not, all cities do not subscribe to the NEC. Having worked with the NFPA for a while, there are certainly not as many municipalities that even know what the National Fire Prevention Association is. Neither are binding unless stipulated by statute or ordinance. Check your local ordinances to make sure. So, no, it isn't necessarily binding at all.
- 'Doc
 

Rt169Radio

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It does nothing for the antenna.

What it does is route any static charge building up on the antenna to ground, and diverts any lightning hits to ground, rather than through the front end of your radio, and then to ground. By itself, the ground connection isn't likely to save your radio, but it is likely to prevent a fire as all that energy finds it's way to ground via flammable construction materials such as wood.



No, not so much.



You run a separate ground conductor, bonded to the metal mount, down the mast, to a ground rod at the base of the mast.
Now what do you mean by bonded? A clamp with copper wire wrapped around it and attached to the antenna or the copper wire soldered to the antenna? Because the pole I want to use is not metal,it is fiberglass.
 
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zz0468

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Now what do you mean by bonded? A clamp with copper wire wrapped around it and attached to the antenna or the copper wire soldered to the antenna? Because the pole I want to use is not metal,it is fiberglass.
Bonded, as in an electrical connection. How about a crimped electrical terminal on the antenna end of the ground wire, bolted to the metal antenna mounting bracket. then run the ground wire down the length of the fiberglass mast, and attached with a suitable clamp to the ground rod.
 

Rt169Radio

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Bonded, as in an electrical connection. How about a crimped electrical terminal on the antenna end of the ground wire, bolted to the metal antenna mounting bracket. then run the ground wire down the length of the fiberglass mast, and attached with a suitable clamp to the ground rod.
Okay I kind of understand now,Is there any illustrations that show how to do that? How would you attach a electrical terminal to the ground wire?
 
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