• Effective immediately we will be deleting, without notice, any negative threads or posts that deal with the use of encryption and streaming of scanner audio.

    We've noticed a huge increase in rants and negative posts that revolve around agencies going to encryption due to the broadcasting of scanner audio on the internet. It's now worn out and continues to be the same recycled rants. These rants hijack the threads and derail the conversation. They no longer have a place anywhere on this forum other than in the designated threads in the Rants forum in the Tavern.

    If you violate these guidelines your post will be deleted without notice and an infraction will be issued. We are not against discussion of this issue. You just need to do it in the right place. For example:
    https://forums.radioreference.com/rants/224104-official-thread-live-audio-feeds-scanners-wait-encryption.html

I'll have my Dell Well-Done, thank you!

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scannerfreak

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Yikes...As I type this on a Lattitude D810...That's gotta be what 1 in roughly a billion though?
 

MacombMonitor

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scanfan03 said:
Judgeing from the position of the fire in the second picture, it looks like the battery or something in the front exploded.
I can't think of anything other than the battery that would be capable of exploding, and burning to that extent. HP/Compaq has had it's share of burning batteries as well. When I was working we went through three major battery recalls from HP/Compaq.
 

dangitdoug

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I really hate to see a perfectly good fire and no marshmallows in sight. What a terrible waste of incendiary material.
 

JHaislet

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LiON batteries are extremely dangerous and behave just like the pictures above when exposed to air/moisture. Sounds like there might have been a tiny crack in the battery casing and enough moisture got in to set off a chain reaction.
 
N

N_Jay

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Its the battery.

Its old news (Li-Ion batteries have been catching fire for years).

It typically happens when charging. (so little risk on a plane, unless you are one of the few using the under seat outlet)

It is often related to a non-oem changer, but factory chargers have had their share of problems.
 

MacombMonitor

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My Dell blew up too

N_Jay said:
Its the battery.

Its old news (Li-Ion batteries have been catching fire for years).

It typically happens when charging. (so little risk on a plane, unless you are one of the few using the under seat outlet)

It is often related to a non-oem changer, but factory chargers have had their share of problems.
Dell says...not the battery this time!

My Dell blew up too
http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=32739
 

JHaislet

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DrMemory1701 said:
It was probably because G. Bush SR. barfed on it
Umm, that's an interesting comment...:roll:

Nothing like making your first post on the board about GB barfing on something...

Now give daddy his computer back and go play outside... ;)

BTW, welcome to the board. :D
 

poltergeisty

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So what should one look out for with their LI-ION batterys?

I have several Dell notebooks and I'm most concerned!

I guess the obvious would be check for cracks as stated above about cracks.

I know Dell had a recall on their chargers because they were catching fire, now batterys. :lol: Freak accident I would guess.



BTW~ It was Kerry. The battery was told to do this and that then not to and sense Kerry couldn't make up his mind the battery just BLEEEEW! :lol: :twisted:
 
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JHaislet

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Given the shear volume of laptops and batteries Dell sells each year, statistically, I'm surprised this kind of stuff doesn't happen more frequently.

@Poltergeisty
The sealed LiON batteries found in laptops consist of a sealed cell pack, which is then sealed inside a hard plastic case. There's really no way of telling if the internal sealed pack has been compromised unless you break away the external plastic shell. Subsequently, just because the plastic cell is cracked, doesn't mean the internal cell is compromised.
 
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