International Shortwave Broadcast Guide

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BMT

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The new International Shortwave Broadcast Guide by Gayle Van Horn W4GVH, is that all important information resource you need to tap into the worldwide shortwave broadcast radio spectrum. It is a 24 hour station/frequency guide to all the stations currently broadcasting on shortwave radio. This unique shortwave resource is the only publication that offers a by-hour schedule that includes all language services, frequencies and world target areas for each broadcast station.


This new e-publication is an expanded version of the English shortwave broadcast guide formerly printed in the pages of Monitoring Times magazine over the last 20 years. This one of a kind electronic e-book will now be published twice a year to correspond with station seasonal time and frequency changes.


If you enjoy listening or monitoring HF shortwave stations, and you miss the monthly English frequency listings formerly published in the late Monitoring Times magazine, and multilingual station listing in the old MTXpress electronic magazine, this valuable tool will now be your new guide to listening to the world.

Amazon.com: International Shortwave Broadcast Guide (International Shortwave Broadcast Guide Winter 2013-2014) eBook: Gayle Van Horn: Kindle Store
 

ka3jjz

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Let's see how this stacks up against the long-established WRTH (World Radio TV Handbook) - particularly in the way of schedule updates. The WRTH issues a PDF file with updates - it will be interesting to see how this new pub gets updated

Mike
 

Airboss

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ISWBG Updates

Let's see how this stacks up against the long-established WRTH (World Radio TV Handbook) - particularly in the way of schedule updates. The WRTH issues a PDF file with updates - it will be interesting to see how this new pub gets updated

Mike
Actually that is simp\le Mike. Unlike the WRTH print we will publish twice a year at the broadcast season switch overs. Anything between then will be updated via the Shortwave Central blog, WRTH comes out once a year with one PDF update only in the mid summer range.

So we will have two complete issues per year, We are very competitive in that regard and the pricing for two editions is still cheaper than the WRTH.

All of this was covered in the press releases we posted last night on all of our radio hobby blog platforms.
http://mt-shortwave.blogspot.com/2013/12/teak-publishing-adds-another-new-e.html

And now you know the rest of the story.

Larry Van Horn N5FPW
Brasstown NC
President Teak Publishing
 
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w2xq

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Wirelessly posted (Moto Droid Bionic: Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 4.1.2; en-us; DROID BIONIC Build/9.8.2O-72_VZW-22) AppleWebKit/534.30 (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/4.0 Mobile Safari/534.30)

You really can't compare the WRTH with MT/Teak. Apples and oranges. Both are useful and were must-haves in my library.

Perhaps too brief an overview, but let me give it a whack...

If one backs up a few decades the WRTH was best known as an industry international reference pub for the broadcasters. Details on addresses, phone and fax (later, e-mail), transmitter coordinates and more details. The USA domestic Broadcasting mag and yearbook were the best commercial resources for USA.

The hobby listener was better probably served by the commercial Passport to WBR and MT and Figliozzi's thingie with a mostly-schedules orientation. I assume Teak is carrying on the mission.

HTH.
 

N0IU

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I get my shortwave schedule in the form of a spreadsheet from the "swskeds" Yahoo group which is put up by the NASWA (North American Short Wave Association).

The current spreadsheet has 23,566 rows of information. It comes with a separate spreadsheet that only has English language broadcasts. But since it is a spreadsheet, you can sort the data by any criteria that you want like time, frequency, country of origin, target area, etc. And by entering your time (in GMT of course), there is even a colum that indicates whether or not the station is currently on.

And the best part, it is free!

The problem with getting something that is "published", even in electronic form, is that by the time you get it, it is probably out of date.
 

majoco

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+1 on what Scott said.The NASWA list is updated almost daily and works very well, although I find the EiBi list and their viewer more 'user friendly'.
 
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