is it worth the extra money??

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n8nnx

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I am debating between the icom ic-t70a and the ic-v80 handheld radios. Is it really worth the extra money for 440mhz?? I know all about the wouxun and baofeng radios and would prefer the icom brand. Is there really that much more activity on 440 to justify the extra $100? Your thoughts??
Thanks
Tony
 

n8nnx

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is it worth the extra money?

I live just outside detroit MI, but the 440 activity is minimal.
 

n8nnx

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Worth the money

Thank you for the info. I will check into it! I am leaning toward the
Icom ic-t70a.
 

N4KVE

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If you're near a large metropolitan area, yes it is worth it.
This is it exactly. If you live in the middle of nowhere, VHF is it. But here in South Florida, most if not all the UHF freq pairs are taken. There's lot's of activity on VHF, & less on UHF. But that's nice too. For real privacy, try 220, or 900. In my car, I have only UHF, & 900, but if I was going to travel, I'd throw a VHF/UHF radio in the car. GARY N4KVE
 

thomast77

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Have you looked at the YAESU FT-60R dualband? I have heard good reviews and it is only $159 at universal radio and gigaparts. They lowered the price to compete with the chinese invasion. At that price you might as well get it even if there is not a lot of activity on 440. Its nice to have access to a quiet band.
 
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n8nnx

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worth the money

Have you looked at the YAESU FT-60R dualband? I have heard good reviews and it is only $159 at universal radio and gigaparts. They lowered the price to compete with the chinese invasion. At that price you might as well get it even if there is not a lot of activity on 440. Its nice to have access to a quiet band.
I have decided to get the ic-t70a dual band radio. I have to agree the ft-60r is a great deal!! I can't understand why people are getting the newer wouxun 6D radio for $175 when they can get the ft-60r for cheaper!! it is a better built radio and the batteries are really cheap on ebay!! Thanks for all the help.
73
Tony
 

roadranger

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Worth the $

Yes. Do you know anyone that uses the "other bands?" Might be worth more to you then. Helps to scan. Listen to the users a while and you might find others you know who are secretive about their alternate use of other bands in the quiet areas. Worked for me.
 

n8nnx

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worth the extra money?

I got the icom ic-t70a the other day and programmed up about 30+ frequencies. I have not heard anything on 440 at all!! I have thrown out my call on all the 440 machines I can hit and NOTHING. Where is everybody? I hear the typical rag chewing on 2 meter but 440 is dead. I am so glad I spent the extra money for 440.
 

gewecke

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Just my .2 cents worth, but you won't catch me on 2m with the other masses, but you would find me on 220, 440,900 and even 462mhz.
So yes it's definitely worth it to have 440mhz. ability. ;)

73,
n9zas
 

n8nnx

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worth the extra money?

Good point!! It is funny, as soon as I posted the last post i threw out my call again on a 440 machine and got a response. I talked for a few minutes and the gentleman told me that the repeater is putting up a new antenna in a few months and raising it up 100 feet higher for better range. I will be for sure monitoring the freq more!!

I need to have more patience!!

73
 

Howdy_All

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If I may inject my own opinions.

It has always been my opinion, that once a year, there seems to be a lot of Free Money floating around - around about income tax time.

This money tends to get spent in a haphazard fashion - on junk that was not needed or wanted the other 11 months out of the year, and it tends to burn a hole in the persons pocket that possess it.

When this time comes around, I tend to shy away from those kinds of people because they tend not to think with their heads but with their wallets.

If a person has $100 to spend, they tend to look towards a $100 item and they rationalize the need for that item - based on the fact that it is within their budget. Not because it does anything really well....

A Handheld radio is a viable option - only when the only reason for using the handheld radio is for transmitting line of sight between two points.

They are great for a group of hams - to use at a ham fest.
At a emergency where the radio is used between two points such as inside the hospital to outside the hospital, outside the hospital to the EOC. The EOC to other members - stationed at such places as firehouses, police stations, ambulance services, emergency shelters etc.

A handheld can never take the place of a 40 or 50 watt mobile and a 1/4 wave antenna mounted on a vehicle.

As long as you understand the limitations of the radio, you will be ok.

2 meters is unique due to the fact that as long as you can maintain some type of LOS between the repeater and the transceiver - you can use the handheld as a mobile or base - as a temporary solution.
Again - it won't ever take the place of a mobile or base - unless your only intentions is to talk simplex a couple of blocks or to talk to the local repeater - where the repeater does all the work.

Repeaters tends to be built on top of mountains or in very high places - where they do the most good and not in someones back yard - because they already own the real estate.

As wavelengths gets smaller, the signal refracts / diffracts / reflects - travels less far over the horizon - hence it is harder for someone with a handheld to talk more then a couple of miles on 440 MHz. / 220 MHz - unless there is repeaters around.

With UHF signals - anything one wavelength or larger between the transmit and the receive can block the signal. Even a piece of aluminum flashing on your roof or a plastic vent pipe with moisture inside - can block the signal with a beam antenna installed in the attic.

So I guess the key is - if you want a good all around radio for use mobile and at home - your needs would be better served by even a cheap mobile radio.
If all you want it for is public service - working parades, ham fests, field days for putting up antenna's and working at the club shack - they can't be beat.

Worrying about power levels is also insignificant.

Just like a flashlight, A 1 or 2 watt / two meter / 440 handheld will only transmit so far and no further.
The limitations is the size of the antenna, the height of the antenna and the loss between the connector and the antenna. The only reason the handheld rubber duckie antenna works is because there is no loss between the antenna and the radio when it is mounted directly to the radio....

The difference is - usually when there is a emergency - the 2 meter repeaters tends to be busy - due to the fact that there is more 2 meter transceivers out there then 220 or 440's - hence if there was a real emergency - the 220 and 440 handhelds would actually be more of a benefit, as a back up 2nd option band - if you needed a quiet place to operate, other then the 2 meters.
 

gewecke

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Um, and you're telling us all this WHY? :lol:
Been there already.


73,
n9zas
 

Howdy_All

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I seem to have attracted the attention of a stalker here.

The reason for all this is to inform the OP who asked the question the benefits and draw backs of a HT and the benefits and drawbacks of having a dual band HT...

One thing I forgot is - if the OP was trying to work locally and someone had a cross repeater - such as a Yaesu FT 8900R - they could essentially use the simplex in their radio to talk and listen on 440 - while the cross repeat radio was transferring their signal into a 2 meter frequency - making their 440 signal look like a much larger signal coming from a much larger antenna.

Buying a dual band walkie talkie is like getting two radios for the price of one.
The one thing I would congratulate the OP on is the fact that they are willing to choose quality over price... When everyone starts buying the Woxsuns - there will be no money put into development of better handhelds by the big 3. Icom / Kenwood / Yaesu

In time - the only choice the manufacturers will have is to cheapen their product or drop the hand held line.
 

n8nnx

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worth the extra money?

Just an FYI,

I have a 65watt mobile rig. There is no way i would expect to hit a repeater 10+ miles away with an ht. The ht is for local use, and there are at least 5+ repeaters within 10 miles of my qth.

I am selling the icom ic-t70a because i got a great deal on a icom ic-92ad. going digital...
 

reedeb

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HMMMM......... I've used HT's in shelters talking to EOC thru a repeater over 25 miles away. I've used an HT to chat with folks thru repeaters around 30+ miles away. True a mobile or base IS better too many carry on this farce about HT's not getting out. Many who say they can't get out need to learn how to use an HT and a better antenna [rubber duck is NOT the only antenna].
 

n8nnx

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is it worth the extra money?

I guess i need to rephrase my last post.

I don't rely on an ht to hit repeaters more than 10+ miles away. I know with the proper antenna i can with no problem. I never use the stock antennas that come with the ht because it is almost like a dummy load. The fist thing I do when I buy an ht is get a new antenna. You could have a $1000 dollar radio with a $10 antenna and not go anywhere, but turn it around and you will get out better.

My original question was referring to an analog ht only. Going digital will cost no matter if you want a dual band ht or not.
 

MeddleMan

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Icom ict70a

I have the radio, and a Yaesu VX-6. I like both. The Icom is a dual band HT. The Yaesu is tri-band, with 1.25m. Yep, the others are correct, but I have great (similar to yours) uses for each.

The main reasons for the purchases for both were:

A) The Icom to replace a once thought lost Icom ic-v8

B) The Yaesu was a sacrificial purchase from my Bro-in-law, who decided to not get into the hobby after all.

You will discover more personal uses of your choice on your own, I'm sure. Look at the articals in QST about your choices. (I still have a hard time deciding between the two I have, for which will serve best, for what purpose!) I do use in my truck the ic-t70a as a mobile, but I use an Icom ic-208H Mobile as a base at home, with a RS Discone antenna on a 10 ft mast. Serves me very well for more than just txing on Ham Radio. I can also listen to the local trunk systems, when I want.
 
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