ISP Antennas Now And Before

Status
Not open for further replies.
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
This thread will discuss how antennas changed for the ISP from now 2014 And going back to the 80's and 70's and 60's. It will include pics of how they changed.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
I dont know on the old cop cars if they are VHF antennas or not because they used to be on VHF. Now they use it to rebroadcast stolen cars and use Starcom21 for its main ops now.
 

scannermanner1

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 14, 2014
Messages
459
Location
In the Western US Mountains :)
the old cop cars have VHF LOW band or VHF HI, I can tell you that much, I would love to talk to some of those cops that drove those old cars. VHF low band is always been a interest of mine, sometime in the near future I want to buy some low band radios and just test out how that works for coverage and range things like that with mobiles & HTs
 
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
the old cop cars have VHF LOW band or VHF HI, I can tell you that much, I would love to talk to some of those cops that drove those old cars. VHF low band is always been a interest of mine, sometime in the near future I want to buy some low band radios and just test out how that works for coverage and range things like that with mobiles & HTs
Nice to see someone interested in Low Band. you can go to your local Motorola dealer and buy some Low Band radios. My tech at my dealer said Motorola only sells certain models because they are out dated. There are certain ranges in the Low Band that are avalibale.
 

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
I worked during that era and all three pictured ISP patrol cars had a long whip VHF low band antenna mounted on the drivers side rear fender, a quarter wave VHF Hi-Band on the roof and a CB radio antenna on the trunk, commonly a lip mount.

The Hi-Band radio was the ISPERN radio which later had crystals for the District Hi-Band (HF-2) frequency. Most ISP radios were either Motorola Micor, Motrac or Syntor Synthesized mobile radios. GE Master Series high band and low band radios were also widely distributed. The state actually provided mobile ISPERN radios to local PD's and SO's for commonality during critical incidents. These photos are just prior to Troopers being issued high band GE portable radios with vehicular repeaters which started getting issued in my area around 1979 or 80. If I remember Correctly most SO's were issued 110 Watt Motorolar mobiles while most PD's were issued 80 watt GE mobiles.

Most low band radios were setup with LF-1 being the District primary LB dispatch channel, 42.50 Car to Car LF-2 and a 39.50 receive channel. We used to cross talk with local PD's via ISP talking on 42.5 and the locals talking back on 39.50.

Later the state had a similar practice to talk to ambulances, the ambulance would transmit on IHERN (155.340) with a specific tone where the ISP District had a receiver. The District would answer on statewide ISP HF-4 frequency 155.460 which was programmed into the ambulance paired to the 155.340 transmitter.

A few Districts utilized a combination of HB and LB simultaneously. In Dist 12 the western part of the District operated on Low Band while the East part of the District operated on HF-2 Hi-Band (154.680). Other Districts took priority traffic on low Band LF-1 but took drivers License, registration and criminal history checks on HF-2. Certain District's like Elgin D-2 still operate in this manner on STARCOM, 2-A and 2-B.
 
Last edited:

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
I just noticed the photo of the 1978 Dodge Monaco had a 2nd 1/4 wave H/B antenna on the trunk deck which would have been the vehicular repeater. The Crown Vic C-181 has a 800 antenna on the roof and a plastic stud antenna which is probably for the IWIN statewide computer. There are 1/4 wave antennas for the High band and probably in-car video system. This trooper may have a scanner in his car and a short 800 antenna for the vehicular repeater. The C-181 car also have the 4 roof antennas for the LoJack stolen vehicle direction finder.

The District 15-159 SUV appears to have the 800 STARCOM antenna and the AM/FM factory plastic roof antenna. The tollway doesn't use the vehicular Repeater on STARCOM to my knowledge. This could be an admin vehicle or it is possible the Tollway stopped installing Hi-Band VHF radios.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
I worked during that era and all three pictured ISP patrol cars had a long whip VHF low band antenna mounted on the drivers side rear fender, a quarter wave VHF Hi-Band on the roof and a CB radio antenna on the trunk, commonly a lip mount.

The Hi-Band radio was the ISPERN radio which later had crystals for the District Hi-Band (HF-2) frequency. Most ISP radios were either Motorola Micor, Motrac or Syntor Synthesized mobile radios. GE high band and low band radios were also widely distributed. The state actually provided mobile ISPERN radios to local PD's and SO's for commonality during critical incidents. These photos are just prior to Troopers being issued high band GE portable radios with vehicular repeaters which started getting issued in my area around 1979 or 80. If I remember Correctly most SO's were issued 110 Watt Motorolar mobiles while most PD's were issued 80 watt GE mobiles.

Most low band radios were setup with LF-1 being the District primary LB dispatch channel, 42.50 Car to Car LF-2 and a 39.50 receive channel. We used to cross talk with local PD's via ISP talking on 42.5 and the locals talking back on 39.50.

Later the state had a similar practice to talk to ambulances, the ambulance would transmit on IHERN (155.340) with a specific tone where the ISP District had a receiver. The District would answer on statewide ISP HF-4 frequency 155.460 which was programmed into the ambulance paired to the 155.340 transmitter.

A few Districts utilized a combination of HB and LB simultaneously. In Dist 12 the western part of the District operated on Low Band while the East part of the District operated on HF-2 Hi-Band (154.680). Other Districts took priority traffic on low Band LF-1 but took drivers License, registration and criminal history checks on HF-2. Certain District's like Elgin D-2 still operate in this manner on STARCOM, 2-A and 2-B.
I just noticed the photo of the 1978 Dodge Monaco had a 2nd 1/4 wave H/B antenna on the trunk deck which would have been the vehicular repeater. The Crown Vic C-181 has a 800 antenna on the roof and a plastic stud antenna which is probably for the IWIN statewide computer. There are 1/4 wave antennas for the High band and probably in-car video system. This trooper may have a scanner in his car and a short 800 antenna for the vehicular repeater. The C-181 car also have the 4 roof antennas for the LoJack stolen vehicle direction finder.

The District 15-159 SUV appears to have the 800 STARCOM antenna and the AM/FM factory plastic roof antenna. The tollway doesn't use the vehicular Repeater on STARCOM to my knowledge. This could be an admin vehicle or it is possible the Tollway stopped installing Hi-Band VHF radios.

That is neat that you know all of this. Now I know some stuff I didnt know before. I actually have one of the 800MHz Starcom21 antennas like the onces in the pictures.
 
Last edited:

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
That picture of the 1995 Chevrolet Caprice must have been in Service for a long time. The D-22 Caprice has the Low Band, Hi-Band and repeater antennas plus the IWIN (black circular Disk) antenna on the trunk lid. I think the first car I was driving to have an IWIN installed was a 99 Crown Vic so it was around 2000 or 2001 before IWIN's were installed in the Southern Districts. The Caprice also has an in-car camera/video 1/4 wave on the trunk lid plus a the grey base loaded antenna is for the CB. The roof mounted 1/4 wave is for the VHF Hi-Band.

The 95 Caprice was one of the best police cars produced, very roomy, good handling, good brakes and the LT1 5.7/350 Cubic inch small block V-8 was a stellar performer.
 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
I worked during that era and all three pictured ISP patrol cars had a long whip VHF low band antenna mounted on the drivers side rear fender, a quarter wave VHF Hi-Band on the roof and a CB radio antenna on the trunk, commonly a lip mount.

The Hi-Band radio was the ISPERN radio which later had crystals for the District Hi-Band (HF-2) frequency. Most ISP radios were either Motorola Micor, Motrac or Syntor Synthesized mobile radios. GE Master Series high band and low band radios were also widely distributed. The state actually provided mobile ISPERN radios to local PD's and SO's for commonality during critical incidents. These photos are just prior to Troopers being issued high band GE portable radios with vehicular repeaters which started getting issued in my area around 1979 or 80. If I remember Correctly most SO's were issued 110 Watt Motorolar mobiles while most PD's were issued 80 watt GE mobiles.

Most low band radios were setup with LF-1 being the District primary LB dispatch channel, 42.50 Car to Car LF-2 and a 39.50 receive channel. We used to cross talk with local PD's via ISP talking on 42.5 and the locals talking back on 39.50.

Later the state had a similar practice to talk to ambulances, the ambulance would transmit on IHERN (155.340) with a specific tone where the ISP District had a receiver. The District would answer on statewide ISP HF-4 frequency 155.460 which was programmed into the ambulance paired to the 155.340 transmitter.

A few Districts utilized a combination of HB and LB simultaneously. In Dist 12 the western part of the District operated on Low Band while the East part of the District operated on HF-2 Hi-Band (154.680). Other Districts took priority traffic on low Band LF-1 but took drivers License, registration and criminal history checks on HF-2. Certain District's like Elgin D-2 still operate in this manner on STARCOM, 2-A and 2-B.
I just noticed the photo of the 1978 Dodge Monaco had a 2nd 1/4 wave H/B antenna on the trunk deck which would have been the vehicular repeater. The Crown Vic C-181 has a 800 antenna on the roof and a plastic stud antenna which is probably for the IWIN statewide computer. There are 1/4 wave antennas for the High band and probably in-car video system. This trooper may have a scanner in his car and a short 800 antenna for the vehicular repeater. The C-181 car also have the 4 roof antennas for the LoJack stolen vehicle direction finder.

The District 15-159 SUV appears to have the 800 STARCOM antenna and the AM/FM factory plastic roof antenna. The tollway doesn't use the vehicular Repeater on STARCOM to my knowledge. This could be an admin vehicle or it is possible the Tollway stopped installing Hi-Band VHF radios.
That picture of the 1995 Chevrolet Caprice must have been in Service for a long time. The D-22 Caprice has the Low Band, Hi-Band and repeater antennas plus the IWIN (black circular Disk) antenna on the trunk lid. I think the first car I was driving to have an IWIN installed was a 99 Crown Vic so it was around 2000 or 2001 before IWIN's were installed in the Southern Districts. The Caprice also has an in-car camera/video 1/4 wave on the trunk lid plus a the grey base loaded antenna is for the CB. The roof mounted 1/4 wave is for the VHF Hi-Band.

The 95 Caprice was one of the best police cars produced, very roomy, good handling, good brakes and the LT1 5.7/350 Cubic inch small block V-8 was a stellar performer.
Here is anther pic of a ISP cop car. You have alot of knowlege on the ISP.
 
Last edited:

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
By the picture the new D-15 Ford still has a Hi-Band radio (1/4 wave antenna) and 800 starCom and IWIN.

Rest of the State got the new Caprice on the statewide bid and most new ISP Patrol cars in my area are Caprices or Tahoe's for CMV.

Here is a picture you probably haven't seen.

 
Last edited:
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
I worked during that era and all three pictured ISP patrol cars had a long whip VHF low band antenna mounted on the drivers side rear fender, a quarter wave VHF Hi-Band on the roof and a CB radio antenna on the trunk, commonly a lip mount.

The Hi-Band radio was the ISPERN radio which later had crystals for the District Hi-Band (HF-2) frequency. Most ISP radios were either Motorola Micor, Motrac or Syntor Synthesized mobile radios. GE Master Series high band and low band radios were also widely distributed. The state actually provided mobile ISPERN radios to local PD's and SO's for commonality during critical incidents. These photos are just prior to Troopers being issued high band GE portable radios with vehicular repeaters which started getting issued in my area around 1979 or 80. If I remember Correctly most SO's were issued 110 Watt Motorolar mobiles while most PD's were issued 80 watt GE mobiles.

Most low band radios were setup with LF-1 being the District primary LB dispatch channel, 42.50 Car to Car LF-2 and a 39.50 receive channel. We used to cross talk with local PD's via ISP talking on 42.5 and the locals talking back on 39.50.

Later the state had a similar practice to talk to ambulances, the ambulance would transmit on IHERN (155.340) with a specific tone where the ISP District had a receiver. The District would answer on statewide ISP HF-4 frequency 155.460 which was programmed into the ambulance paired to the 155.340 transmitter.

A few Districts utilized a combination of HB and LB simultaneously. In Dist 12 the western part of the District operated on Low Band while the East part of the District operated on HF-2 Hi-Band (154.680). Other Districts took priority traffic on low Band LF-1 but took drivers License, registration and criminal history checks on HF-2. Certain District's like Elgin D-2 still operate in this manner on STARCOM, 2-A and 2-B.
I just noticed the photo of the 1978 Dodge Monaco had a 2nd 1/4 wave H/B antenna on the trunk deck which would have been the vehicular repeater. The Crown Vic C-181 has a 800 antenna on the roof and a plastic stud antenna which is probably for the IWIN statewide computer. There are 1/4 wave antennas for the High band and probably in-car video system. This trooper may have a scanner in his car and a short 800 antenna for the vehicular repeater. The C-181 car also have the 4 roof antennas for the LoJack stolen vehicle direction finder.

The District 15-159 SUV appears to have the 800 STARCOM antenna and the AM/FM factory plastic roof antenna. The tollway doesn't use the vehicular Repeater on STARCOM to my knowledge. This could be an admin vehicle or it is possible the Tollway stopped installing Hi-Band VHF radios.
That picture of the 1995 Chevrolet Caprice must have been in Service for a long time. The D-22 Caprice has the Low Band, Hi-Band and repeater antennas plus the IWIN (black circular Disk) antenna on the trunk lid. I think the first car I was driving to have an IWIN installed was a 99 Crown Vic so it was around 2000 or 2001 before IWIN's were installed in the Southern Districts. The Caprice also has an in-car camera/video 1/4 wave on the trunk lid plus a the grey base loaded antenna is for the CB. The roof mounted 1/4 wave is for the VHF Hi-Band.

The 95 Caprice was one of the best police cars produced, very roomy, good handling, good brakes and the LT1 5.7/350 Cubic inch small block V-8 was a stellar performer.
By the picture the new D-15 Ford still has a Hi-Band radio (1/4 wave antenna) and 800 starCom and IWIN.

Rest of the State got the new Caprice on the statewide bid and most new ISP Patrol cars in my area are Caprices or Taho's for CMV.

Here is a picture you probably haven't seen.

No I have not seen that one. Did you drive that kind before?
 

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
The Green Camaro was assigned to me to drive for a Couple of years. This was one of the cars purchased by DOT for the ISP to apprehend aggressive drivers. This Camaro was a 99 B4C package but the ISP also used some Mustang GT's and Camaro SS's.

I worked as a LEO in Illinois from 77 to 2013 but the last couple of years I just worked part time to help a couple of local PD's and SO's fill shifts. I was always a radio geek and had a Bearcat III scanner when I was in high school and CB's in my car. I even listened to the local PD on a service band radio before being able to afford my first scanner.

As you get older you say those were the good ole days and for me in many respects they were.
 
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
1,133
Location
Peoria, IL
The Green Camaro was assigned to me to drive for a Couple of years. This was one of the cars purchased by DOT for the ISP to apprehend aggressive drivers. This Camaro was a 99 B4C package but the ISP also used some Mustang GT's and Camaro SS's.

I worked as a LEO in Illinois from 77 to 2013 but the last couple of years I just worked part time to help a couple of local PD's and SO's fill shifts. I was always a radio geek and had a Bearcat III scanner when I was in high school and CB's in my car. I even listened to the local PD on a service band radio before being able to afford my first scanner.

As you get older you say those were the good ole days and for me in many respects they were.
I know what you are talking about. I remember when IDOT used low band but now they are on Starcom21. What is a LEO for IL?
 

VASCAR2

Member
Joined
Jun 5, 2011
Messages
358
Location
So Illinois
LEO= Law Enforcement Officer, I worked as a local Police Officer, ISP Trooper, then part time as Deputy Sheriff and local Police Officer.
 

FFPM571

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Mar 11, 2003
Messages
1,304
Location
Chicago area
The antenna on the center of the trunk of the 78 monaco is a CB. Yes district 15 still uses VHF in their cars
 

RADIOGUY2002

Member
Joined
Jul 19, 2002
Messages
1,103
Location
Chicago Burbs
Details

The antenna on the center of the trunk of the 78 monaco is a CB. Yes district 15 still uses VHF in their cars
Yeap, speed details (wolf packing), car to car bs, etc.... kinda cool that they retain it. Response to other towns. D14 cars have access to the sheriff and city pd. Not sure if all cars have it though. Still have quite a few older cars.
 

gewecke

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
7,473
Location
Illinois
I know what you are talking about. I remember when IDOT used low band but now they are on Starcom21. What is a LEO for IL?
Tony, some districts are still using low band for IDOT trucks as well as starcom to deal with coverage issues.
LEO's are law enforcement officers, FTO = field training officers PIO = public information officers and my favorite of course are ACO's = animal control officers. :lol::twisted:

73,
n9zas
 

gewecke

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
7,473
Location
Illinois
The antenna on the center of the trunk of the 78 monaco is a CB. Yes district 15 still uses VHF in their cars
During the 4th of july I heard two district 15 cars on 154.650/D754 so even car to car is still popular at times. :)

73,
n9zas
 

N9JIG

Sheriff
Moderator
Joined
Dec 14, 2001
Messages
4,597
Location
Far NW Valley
ISP cars before StarCom21 usually had the following antennas:
1: VHF Low Band whip, usually on the driver's side rear quarter panel.
2: VHF 1/4 wave for the ISPEN/HF2 radio on the trunk lid.
3: VHF 1/4 wave on the rear roof center for the Mobile Extender (155.505)
4: CB antenna on the trunk lip.

Occasionally some cars had an 800, UHF or VHF radio for the local county system or a group of 4 VHF 1/4 waves for a Lojack receiver. Many also had scanners with some sort of antenna, usually from Radio Shack.

District 15 cars usually did not have the low band whip after 1990 or so when they switched to UHF and ditched the old 42.66 "Evasion" channel. When they switched to 155.925 for this they usually did not install low band on new cars. They did have UHF antennas, usually an A/S gain whip. Still later when they first went 800 they replaced that with an 800 pigtail.

In later years as ALERTS terminals (and later IWIN) were installed these had 800 MHz. whips or disk panels. For IWIN they usually used a disk that combined GPS and cellular. Some cars had a separate GPS antenna, such as a Garmin magnet mount or a disk.

As some cars got video systems they used another VHF whip for the 168-172 MHz. wireless mic.

Individual troopers may have installed other radios and devices like GPS, XM, scanners, ham radios, etc. I even saw a VHF marine radio in an ISP car once downstate.

After the EDACS came around in the Chicago area District 3 and 4 cars lost their Low Band whip. You could still see the patch on the side where it was removed from. LAter as the SC21 system took over most other districts ditched the low band antennas. I haven't seen an ISP car in service with a low band whip still installed for years.
 

gewecke

Completely Banned for the Greater Good
Banned
Joined
Jan 29, 2006
Messages
7,473
Location
Illinois
Thanks Rich, for the brief rundown... :cool:

It's interesting how ISP comms have changed over the years, as well as their vehicles.
I miss the days of listening to the extenders on .505 since they often repeated traffic from other districts while parked close to me.

Lately in northern Ill. I've been hearing frequent traffic on 154.650/ D754 from D15 which SOS might be using at times, judging from all the MCS inspections. ;)

73,
n9zas
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top