Kentucky State Police Low Band.

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KD4GDT

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I know back in the 1970's the K.S.P. used to use VHF lo-band, I used to listen to the Richmond Post and when I lived in Elizabethtown area their post. I do know K.S.P. E-town used different frequencies than Richmond and the frequency for Richmond was the same as Bowling Green. (I could hear BG call their units by the Bowling Green phrase.)

The four known frequencies I have are: 45.540 P/C and 44.780 C/P
44.620 P/C and 44.780 C/P

P/C- Post to Car
C/P-Car to Post

I know later 44.620 was used by Vehicle Enforcement until they were added under the K.S.P.'s new system several years ago in addition to the famous 453.300 Mobile/State frequency. I'm not sure when KVE used 44.620 it was in simplex or duplex.

I'm guessing with the old VHF lo system the each post had different pl tones.
I was explaining the various radio systems the K.S.P. used thru the years and I didn't have much information on this one.

Thanks to anyone who may still have this information from many years back.
 

ofd8001

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If I remember right, all posts used the same PL tones. On busy nights it could be a "free for all". I recall hearing any number of times calling their post saying another post covered them up.

They were all four channel radios. I did some time with the state fire marshal's office and our vehicles had KSP radios.

The 44.62/44.78 was the primary pair. If a trooper wanted to speak with another unit, they had to switch to another channel which was 44.62 direct (TX and RX) or C2C.

That "other" frequency (45.54) would be used as a relay frequency. For example the dispatcher at LaGrange needed to contact a unit in Carroll County. The LaGrange transmitter and Carroll County didn't have enough "horsepower" to speak with each other, so they had that relay set up.

It was also kind of neat how KSP and local LE did some "cross banding". Each police vehicle had a scanner monitoring the other frequencies. KSP would talk on their C2C channel which would be monitored by local law enforcement. Local law enforcement would talk on their frequencies monitored by KSP.
 

CptCrunch

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First thanks for your information and corrections to my, what I thought, was correct frequency pairs. Your reply reminded me of some things I did know about the old low band system. I remember hearing one of the Post 7 (Richmond) units when I lived in Winchester back in the late 70's talking to one of the local PD units which was VHF Hi. I had forgotten about that being done but I remembered it as soon as I read it. I know then the KSP didn't have the cross-band radios like they do now and since the switch to the first UHF system. I thought there were more frequencies than these, I guess the sales person at Radio Shack in Elizabethtown decided to make some quick extra cash off me in 1978 saying that KSP E-Town wasn't on the same frequency as KSP Bowling Green or Richmond. I was living in the Harlan Post area when they started adding the UHF radios in the cars and you'd see the whip, the UHF antenna, and the VHF radio antenna for the troopers portables. It was a few years later that I understood how that system works and I've used the same thing with my Amateur Radio equipment.
I had gotten interested in scanners about 40 years ago so much of the radio systems was quite new to me. Now I know more at times than I need to. Since my local system didn't change much until the last 4-5 years I knew those well. Personally they work better than their new P-25 systems.

Again thank you for your information.
 

pjscott51

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I remember listening the low band on my BC 210. But living in Louisville I had a hard time hearing the trooper side. That is until I discovered the VHF high mobile extender frequency. I think KSP still uses the same mobile extender frequency with special events like the Ky State Fair. When KSP moved to the UHF it was worse because there was so much interference from I think I remember from mobile phones.
 

ofd8001

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The mobile extender frequency (154.665) has been in use ever since the "git go". The only present day difference is that it is digital versus analog.

For special events, such as the state fair, they use a different frequency, 154.92. There is a repeater for that at the fairgrounds, which is digital. (Used to be simplex long ago, however).
 

ofd8001

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I could be wrong on whether they are using digital for the mobile extenders (PAC RT) or if it is still analog.

At any rate I'm 99.44% sure that the 154.665 has been the mobile extender (PAC RT) frequency since at least the early 80's.
 

Dangronenthal

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Dan. KD&KMA>

In the 70s growing up in Spokane the P.D was on 39.74. Then I went to FT POLK Louisiana, As MPs we were on 46.60-Jeep. Sedan were vhf 163.815. Deridder P.D was on 39.74, I could listen t0 Spokane every morning during skip. Vernon Parish Sheriffs office was on 39.26. With an 108 inch whip to my scanner on the 2nd floor of the barrcks I picked up LO-VHF traffic from all over the U.S including Hawaii.
Sheriffs in Ca were easy to pick up as well. The entire State of Louisiana troop(s) dispatch was on 39.30 I could listen to all the troops by turning in my squelch. The hail freq or mars was 39.50 and that one was busy. One that came in clear all over was the Lafayette Sheriffs office. I'm going to get back into Low band dxing soon, CHP still is using Lo-VHF freqa and they are not going to get rid of it either.

10-73 From Ft Polk and Seattle. Also New LLano PD was 39.58 and there was skip from Iowa every night.
Happy Trails. KD7-KMA clear.
 
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