• To anyone looking to acquire commercial radio programming software:

    Please do not make requests for copies of radio programming software which is sold (or was sold) by the manufacturer for any monetary value. All requests will be deleted and a forum infraction issued. Making a request such as this is attempting to engage in software piracy and this forum cannot be involved or associated with this activity. The same goes for any private transaction via Private Message. Even if you attempt to engage in this activity in PM's we will still enforce the forum rules. Your PM's are not private and the administration has the right to read them if there's a hint to criminal activity.

    If you are having trouble legally obtaining software please state so. We do not want any hurt feelings when your vague post is mistaken for a free request. It is YOUR responsibility to properly word your request.

    To obtain Motorola software see the Sticky in the Motorola forum.

    The various other vendors often permit their dealers to sell the software online (i.e., Kenwood). Please use Google or some other search engine to find a dealer that sells the software. Typically each series or individual radio requires its own software package. Often the Kenwood software is less than $100 so don't be a cheapskate; just purchase it.

    For M/A Com/Harris/GE, etc: there are two software packages that program all current and past radios. One package is for conventional programming and the other for trunked programming. The trunked package is in upwards of $2,500. The conventional package is more reasonable though is still several hundred dollars. The benefit is you do not need multiple versions for each radio (unlike Motorola).

    This is a large and very visible forum. We cannot jeopardize the ability to provide the RadioReference services by allowing this activity to occur. Please respect this.

Kenwood/ICOM Programming help - Paid Help

jgkurz

Newbie
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
3
Hello, I am new to this forum and need some advice. I have a large side by side ATV riding group that has made a significant investment in car to car radios. The radios are 99% Kenwood TX-7360's with one ICOM. Unfortunately, the vendor we purchased all the radios from will not help train even for a fee.

We have a riding trip coming up so learning the proper programming steps in time will be difficult. I would like to pay for programming services. I am in the Pacific NW USA if that matters.

Can you recommend an individual or business that can help with programming? I have all the proper software and cables so I can export files, connect Teamviewer, or whatever is easiest. THANK YOU
 

jgkurz

Newbie
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
3
I do not have an FCC license. I would like to rearrange the channels that were programmed on the radio by the vendor. Essentially want to create a zone with specific channels.
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
14,727
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
I do not have an FCC license. I would like to rearrange the channels that were programmed on the radio by the vendor. Essentially want to create a zone with specific channels.
No reputable shop/tech is going to program radios for you that you are not properly licensed to use.
I know this happens frequently in the off road world, companies like Rugged Radios and Racing Radios don't seem to care about FCC licensing.

But most of us do. Those of us that do this sort of stuff for a living can get busted by the FCC (as in fines) for programming radios with frequencies that are not licensed to the users.

As for the dealer not training you on how to do it, for some radio shops, radio programming is how they make their money. Some won't sell software/cables to the end users to ensure they keep the revenue stream flowing.

My advice would be to get properly licensed by the FCC for an itinerant frequency or two and make this all legal. It's not hard to do and is relatively inexpensive. Doing it right the first time makes life easier for everyone.

There are no "license free" frequencies you can use those radios on. The existing off road channels in the radios sold by Racing Radios/Rugged Radios, or otherwise perpetuated by the off road crowd are not legally licensed for people to use the way they think. Unfortunately a few sleazy shops have tapped into this market and made people thinks it's OK.

Really, it's not hard to get licensed. Once you get that done, you'll find it'll be easier to get assistance in the programming.
 

jgkurz

Newbie
Joined
Aug 1, 2020
Messages
3
No reputable shop/tech is going to program radios for you that you are not properly licensed to use.

Really, it's not hard to get licensed. Once you get that done, you'll find it'll be easier to get assistance in the programming.
Interesting. That's exactly my scenario. I purchased from a popular vendor that offers off-road radios for car to car communications. They even named the frequencies specific to their company. My plan was to create a new zone for a subset of the frequencies they already provided. I "assumed" those frequencies would be legal to use or program into a new zone. I will look at getting licensed. Thank you for the guidance.
 

mmckenna

I ♥ Ø
Joined
Jul 27, 2005
Messages
14,727
Location
SNCZCA01DS0
Interesting. That's exactly my scenario. I purchased from a popular vendor that offers off-road radios for car to car communications. They even named the frequencies specific to their company. My plan was to create a new zone for a subset of the frequencies they already provided. I "assumed" those frequencies would be legal to use or program into a new zone. I will look at getting licensed. Thank you for the guidance.
Cool, thanks for understanding where I was coming from with that.

The two companies I mentioned (and probably a few others) have been doing this for a long time. They know better, but they don't care because the money keeps flowing in.

I'm with you, though. I ride UTV's quite a bit. In fact, just got back from a trip last night. Everyone I ride with has their amateur radio license, so we're all running on amateur radio frequencies while on the trails. Every UTV (about 7 of them now) all have VHF mobile radios. It really makes for a safer and more enjoyable experience for everyone. Too easy to get separated on the trails and someone misses a turn. We won't go riding without the radios anymore.

The FCC rules are really super clear on this. The only one who can add radios to a license is the license holder. The racing frequencies, like BF Goodrich, KOH, Weatherman, etc. are all licensed to specific users and companies. To operate under their license, you would be required to have permission in writing from the license holder. There is no exception or waiver to those rules. The companies that are selling these radios either completely ignore the FCC rules, or will put some disclaimer in fine print saying it's up to the buyer to secure licensing.

However….
Weatherman is a common frequency, 151.625MHz. It's considered an "itinerant" frequency by the FCC, in other words, when properly licensed, it can be used anywhere the FCC has jurisdiction. As an itinerant channel, it's really easy to get licensed, and any reputable radio shop can assist you.
 

merlin

Member
Joined
Jul 3, 2003
Messages
390
Location
South East Idaho
If not mistaken, those are 50 watt VHF high split radios. anything transmitting from 150 to 174 you must have a licensed qualification.
If they were UHF, there is always FRS but that even has power limitations. 5 watt EIRP and some shared channels, 2 watt to be license free.
mmckenna brought up "itinerant" frequencies, that still needs a license, but a few $$ and a small form, you get a restricted license, even online I think.
Just be sure the frequency you 'do' operate on, you are within power limits.
 

hill

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
822
Location
Middle River, MD
Even if the radios were UHF you couldn't legally program FRS frequencies. FRS radio must have a non removable antennas among some other requirements. Mainly just bubble pack FRS radios are used.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

Member
Joined
Dec 22, 2013
Messages
4,337
Cool, thanks for understanding where I was coming from with that.

The two companies I mentioned (and probably a few others) have been doing this for a long time. They know better, but they don't care because the money keeps flowing in.

I'm with you, though. I ride UTV's quite a bit. In fact, just got back from a trip last night. Everyone I ride with has their amateur radio license, so we're all running on amateur radio frequencies while on the trails. Every UTV (about 7 of them now) all have VHF mobile radios. It really makes for a safer and more enjoyable experience for everyone. Too easy to get separated on the trails and someone misses a turn. We won't go riding without the radios anymore.

The FCC rules are really super clear on this. The only one who can add radios to a license is the license holder. The racing frequencies, like BF Goodrich, KOH, Weatherman, etc. are all licensed to specific users and companies. To operate under their license, you would be required to have permission in writing from the license holder. There is no exception or waiver to those rules. The companies that are selling these radios either completely ignore the FCC rules, or will put some disclaimer in fine print saying it's up to the buyer to secure licensing.

However….
Weatherman is a common frequency, 151.625MHz. It's considered an "itinerant" frequency by the FCC, in other words, when properly licensed, it can be used anywhere the FCC has jurisdiction. As an itinerant channel, it's really easy to get licensed, and any reputable radio shop can assist you.
I have seen the ads from Rugged Radio and have wondered how they have the gall to market like they do. In addition to flaunting FCC rules, those radios are being taken across border and used in Baja Mexico. At some point Mexican authorities are going to make an example of some Americans and it will be an expensive and messy situation for them.

We have a situation here in FL where "reputable" dealers are licensing most of the UHF spectrum and programming radios for folks to "operate under their licenses". It is near impossible for a legitimate customer to license their own channels and if they operate illegally, they are responsible. I had a client operating a repeater for decades thinking it was licensed somehow.
 
Top