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Kenwood TK-2360 Pair

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tomhouston

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Aug 28, 2011
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I've acquired two 2360's and I'm trying to figure out what I'll need to do in order to use them for voice communications between the radios (No base station). I'd like to use the 5W VHF band for maximum range if possible.

- FCC license (GMRS? LMR? None?).
- Programming (Prog. in general frequencies for GMRS? or get a dedicated frequency from the FCC?).

Sorry for the general questions but I've spent hours over the past few weeks searching the FCC Web site and these forums to try and figure out a way forward but I'm really lost with all of this.

Thanks for your time with this!
 

TheManBornWithin

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Ocean County, NJ
GMRS is for UHF, which you wouldn't be able to use.

MURS is restricted to 2 watts and is mobile-to-mobile, so don't expect a far range.

How far apart are you looking to use these radios? A repeater would be best for maximum distance.
 

tomhouston

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Aug 28, 2011
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Thanks for the responses guys.

I'm looking to use the full distance capabilities of the units if possible and it seems like I'll need a LMR license to do so. I just wish it wasn't going to run me $260 to get them up and running...
 

alphacommnj

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Gillette, NJ
FCC License and Frequencies

tomhouston,
The license that you are referring to depends on what you will be using the radios for. A license that costs $260 is usually for a business IG license from the FCC and is restricted to commercial operations. The FCC has standards and categories for licensees to apply for depending not on your radio, but what type of communications you will be conducting.

Your Kenwood TK-2360 radios are VHF capable of 136-174mhz. The two most common options for your radio are:
BUSINESS: Conventional VHF operations, IG License from the FCC either fixed or itinerant (no particular location) operations. You will have to file through a frequency coordinator for fixed operations and the $260 license fee is paid to the FCC. This is for commercial use/business comms and will need to be documented in the license. Power limit is "unlimited" per say, somewhere around 50-100 watts. The freq. coordinator or yourself may choose a desired frequency that is clear in your area.
PERSONAL: MURS Conventional VHF operations. No license required but operator is limited to the use of the 5 MURS frequencies (151.820 MHz, 151.880 MHz, 151.940 MHz, 154.570 MHz, 154.600 MHz). Also power output must be limited to 2 watts. Any kind of personal or business comms can be conducted on MURS, granted they follow general FCC rules (no profanity, broadcasting music, etc.) Anyone conducting personal communications on the radio is NOT eligible to file for a private frequency.

If you had the Kenwood TK-3360 or other UHF radios your options would be similar. Business use could file for a license for private frequencies or personal comms would be conducted by programming the radio to GMRS/FRS frequencies.

In any case, those are a great set of radios that will hold up well over time. Good pick! :)
What will you be using the radios for?
 

tomhouston

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Joined
Aug 28, 2011
Messages
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Thanks for the info/feedback! I'm planning on using the radios for personal/business communications and really wanted to leverage the additional power output available to the VHF frequencies. I guess I'll need to pony up the $260 and get it done and prepare to repeat the process every 5 years. I just wish there was a price break with the FCC for mainly personal VHF comms. $260? What's the reasoning behind that? Maybe it's time to put up an antenna and run at 100 Watts.
 

alphacommnj

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Oct 31, 2011
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Location
Gillette, NJ
It's just the cost of doing business with the FCC. A business license however lasts for 10yrs, so in essence it is only $26/yr which is not bad at all. That's $26 for unlimited access to a semi-private frequency(ies). I can't even fill half a tank of gas each week for $26 :mad:

There is no price break for licenses used for mostly personal comms because if you have a business license, it should be used for 100% business. If not, then technically you should not be filing for an FCC business license. Instead, you should look into Amateur radio for all personal communications. There is practically no power limit, you have access to a large # of frequencies, and you will learn a whole lot about radio communication while getting your license. :)
 
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