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Kids doing test counts on HF-GCS, 22 March, 2019

Token

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The HF-GCS (High Frequency Global Communications System) is an integral part of US military readiness. For those unfamiliar, this is a US Air Force maintained global communications network consisting of multiple transmitters at multiple transmitter sites around the world. Although the USAF maintains it, all US services, and sometimes NATO forces, can use it. This is the radio network that transmits Skykings and EAMs, among other traffic.

Among its regular transmissions are test counts and radio tests, typically heard many times per day. And, while the USAF personnel running the mic can sometimes sound a bit young, March 22, 2019 had some younger than average sounding voices.

I don't know if it was a command open house, or just a take your kids to work day, but two test counts in a row, starting at about 1826 UTC, were kids voices. Whatever the circumstances it was quite cool, and a reminder that the folks making up the armed forces, all armed forces, are humans, many with children of their own.

This is not the first time kids voices have been heard on HF-GCS, but it is the first time I caught a recording of it.

A video of my recording here, unfortunately I missed the start of each transmission.

T!
 

vagrant

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This is hilarious. I can imagine being on the other end of those transmissions in an official capacity and suddenly hear that. I would start laughing. I'm sure a WTF would float in there while I laughed.

I figure they prerecorded the children and played it back to surprise all those within earshot.
 

N3CI

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Very funny. USAF folks letting their kids experience what their folks do. Nice catch.
 

zz0468

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I love it! That would have been fun to catch. Over the years, my travels have required occasional entry on to various military bases, and I've always seen things like kids on bicycles, mothers pushing strollers, and children at play signs. A good reminder that they're actually people.
 

krokus

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Considering the locations where I have used HiCom, kids would not be allowed, if the USAF follows similar protocol.

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fleef

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The HF-GCS (High Frequency Global Communications System) is an integral part of US military readiness. For those unfamiliar, this is a US Air Force maintained global communications network consisting of multiple transmitters at multiple transmitter sites around the world. Although the USAF maintains it, all US services, and sometimes NATO forces, can use it. This is the radio network that transmits Skykings and EAMs, among other traffic.

Among its regular transmissions are test counts and radio tests, typically heard many times per day. And, while the USAF personnel running the mic can sometimes sound a bit young, March 22, 2019 had some younger than average sounding voices.

I don't know if it was a command open house, or just a take your kids to work day, but two test counts in a row, starting at about 1826 UTC, were kids voices. Whatever the circumstances it was quite cool, and a reminder that the folks making up the armed forces, all armed forces, are humans, many with children of their own.

This is not the first time kids voices have been heard on HF-GCS, but it is the first time I caught a recording of it.

A video of my recording here, unfortunately I missed the start of each transmission.

T!
Aww, DARN! I *used to* monitor those very HF frequencies for EAMs and the like. I so missed this exciting and interesting catch.
 

Token

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Considering the locations where I have used HiCom, kids would not be allowed, if the USAF follows similar protocol.
It is not unheard of, even for very secure facilities and spaces, to have a "family day" or something similar. To be sure, you have to sanitize the spaces before and after, but it is still something that is done, no harder than having foreign dignitaries or forces tour the spaces. It is also common to have some of the gear on display, turned on and doing things, during such an event. Once you have command authorization for the event, always good for moral and PR, you can generally find an unclassified mode of operation to make the lights and sounds you want people to see. I have seen it done in CICs on ships, missile control rooms at various locations, communications centers, operations control areas, radars, etc.

In this case we are talking about a communications center. Put away anything classified on the walls and desks, wipe the crypto keys in the local gear, lock the safes, bring up unclassified displays (such as training modes or modes used in association with foreign forces) for all the monitors, and you are good to go. In the case of a primary communication node shift control from that node to another for the duration of the event.

Keying an HF radio with no keys loaded would not be inherently classified, so you could have access to such a system operational during the family day, the visitors could hear things and do things, and all would be good.

T!
 
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