Kilowatt or Killo

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crazy_19

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I've been listing to the various nets on 14.30mhz throught the day and have been hearing 'kilowatt' used in a manner like a phonetic code word but have also been hearing 'kilo' used.

Just thought i'd post this to check if i'm right in hearing it as a phonetic code word or if i'm miss-understanding its ussage.
 

Kirk

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It's a pet peeve of mine. The proper phonetic is "Kilo" but many people use "Kilowatt." It makes me want to reply back as follows:

Them: This is Kilowatt 6 Alpha Bravo Charlie
Me: Go ahead, Kilo Whiskey 6 Alpha Bravo Charlie

Haven't done it yet, but it'll probably happen eventually.
 

n9mxq

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Does it really matter as long as you know it's the letter K? Nope. Wait until field day, then you'll hear some real creative phonetics, especially as the ops get more and more tired..

Funny Phonetics can also garner a few extra points.. One year I was operating under a friends callsign.. Kilo Alpha 9 Oscar Yankee Romeo... When I switched it up to Kilo Alpha 9 Old Yaesu Radio people started answering. Might have been coincidence, might not. And yes, I was on an old Yaesu radio
 

WB4CS

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As other's have pointed out, technically either one is acceptable. "Kilo" is the standard, but "Kilowatt" has been used since the beginning of ham radio.

Also take note, there is a second set of phonetics called "DX Phonetics" that are often used on HF. Countries where English is a second language, some of the standard phonetics are difficult for them to pronounce. Most of the letters are represented by recognizable countries or cities. "Brazil" for "B" is a good example. These are widely used and accepted on HF. Do an internet search for "DX Phonetics" to find the list.

And I also agree, 14.300 is not a good representation of ham radio. Neither is 14.313. If you do an internet search on both frequencies you'll see that both of those frequencies are gathering spots for riff-raff in the hobby. On some other ham radio forums, just the mention of either frequency can get a thread shut down :)
 

Token

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Phonetic alphabets, there is more than one “standard” (for example today some police departments still use one that is still mostly common names), and oooohhh so many non-standards. While I try to hold to the NATO Phonetic Alphabet myself I don’t really see a lot wrong with people using unusual, as long as easily identifiable, alternatives. I am not a fan of things like “Chases Young Ladies” for CYL, although naturally outside serious identification that kind of stuff has a place. Particularly true when someone is having a problem pulling out the NATO phonetics, after a couple of attempts with the “standards” I will sometimes use other words, such as country names.

When I first entered the ham world in the 60’s my Elmer (a WW II vet) used, and taught me, the “old” military standard, such as King instead of Kilo, George instead of Golf, and Dog instead of Delta. At that time the NATO standard was already well known and adopted by many, but not all. Once I entered the military the NATO phonetics got driven home well.

T!
 

pyro424

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Yep always guys using different phonectics. Ocean, Killowatt whatever. I was taught using the NATO phonetics and so that is what I stick to. If someone says their call with odd phonetics it doesnt even bother me nor do I care. I just write the call down and when I respond I always respond with standard NATO phonetics. That is how I say my call and also how I say everyone elses. Nobody is ever offended by that or anything. It is just the way I say phonetics and it is second nature to me to use those. Nothing else. The only occasion I could ever say I have not said a letter in NATO phonetics is the odd time when there is a really light station. A station that can just not get my call even though he already tried to copy it 2 or 3 times. Then perhaps I have said Ocean instead of oscar etc. The other exception is when saying QRN or QRM. Usually I will say QR Nancy, or QR Mary. Just like sometimes someone cant copy a number. For instance if I was trying to tell him I was number 5 but he just couldnt get it, I may say, Five, as in 1,2,3,4,5. Five. Over
 

Kirk

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To clarify, I'm not saying my peeve is justified, it just is what it is. :)

I always felt "kilowatt" was trying to be boastful, like "I have MORE POWER!!!!"

Maybe I'll start using Kiloohm.

Resistance is futile.
 

Cunnerman

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It's a pet peeve of mine. The proper phonetic is "Kilo" but many people use "Kilowatt." It makes me want to reply back as follows:

Them: This is Kilowatt 6 Alpha Bravo Charlie
Me: Go ahead, Kilo Whiskey 6 Alpha Bravo Charlie

Haven't done it yet, but it'll probably happen eventually.
Me too.

Of course I know what the op means. But it can be difficult/confusing because kilo is one word - designating K. Kilowatt sounds like Kilo Watt, which is two words and could designate K W. It's like using Oscarmeyer or Oceanspray for O; Whiskeybottle for W; etc.

Does the other op mean O, OM, OS, W, WB? I think there's a reason that standard phonetics are one word and not compound words.
 

Kirk

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Am I a horrible person because now I'm wishing my call had an O in it?

Oscarmeyer. Hee hee hee
 

khooke

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I use kilo for my call, but 'kilo kilo six ... ' doesn't seem to come across that well in poor conditions or during contests. I think I now understand the benefits of vanity calls :) two same letters together apparently is confusing to some, but 'kilowatt kilowatt' seems to get it across. Whatever works I guess??
 

Kirk

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The perfect phonetic for K is Kirk. Duh. ;-)
 

KC0KM

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I will throw my two cents worth in as well. I agree, at times kilowatt can be interpreted as two words --Kilo Watt, and I admit it that is the way I think of it most often. But there are others as well. My father --W0UVX, often calls it Whiskey Zero Ultra Violet X-Ray, that is how he learned it about 50 some odd years ago (his call sign is a former college roommate's call, who later changed it). I have told him, unless he is with people he knows, to use standard calls, because most will hear it as ultraviolet instead of ultra / violet.

One the other hand, using non-standard during field day, also can be confusing. A few years ago someone was using Zanderphar instead of Zulu (or Zed). When it is who knows what time in the middle of the night, or early Sunday morning after hours of operating, sometimes your brain and tongue are not always connecting correctly, and something like Zanderphar is a little hard to get out (for that matter even I am fully awake it is hard). Our Club call is Kilo Zero Golf Quebec, which also can be a tongue twister. Some use Germany, but I like Golf Queen, although...ummm... it might sound a little "funny". But I still thing using a standard -- whatever it be -- should be used, particularly during something like field day. A lot of operations are fast moving, and if the bands are noisy, using fancy phonetics is --at times -- irritating. It all depends on the ones used, and how they are interpreted.
 

k9rzz

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Sometimes you say whatever get's through. You might say "kilo" 20 times and the other guy can't figure it out through the interference, they you say "kilowatt" and that may do the trick.

What's your call????

Kilo 9, Kilowatt 9, Kentucky 9, Kayyyyyyy 9.

Whatever works.

What DOES work during field day is a sexy YL on the microphone: "CQ Field Day from W9FK, W9 Fuzzy Kitten." :^]

It doesn't matter of she's 400 lbs with a wooden leg, just as long as she SOUNDS good. LOL
 

FeedForward

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A few clarifications: The whole point of having a phoenetic system is that it would be a standardized system for clarity of communications. Those who say, well, if the guy understands it, why would it matter? Well it does matter because you are not asking the receiving operator to review every term that he remembers hearing before deciding on what you are saying. Sadly, the attempt to get a standardized system to stick has not yet taken hold. Or else the concept is not appreciated. Sure you can make up your own system and probably a lot of people will get it, but that's not the intended goal. I recommend using the current MIL/NATO system. It works. And you will not sound like an ignorant CB'er. (not that there is anything wrong with that). Just as Morse was being introduced there were lots of disagreements about what dots and dashes should make up each letter. Fortunately we got past that phase. Let's do so with phoenetics.
 

KF5YDR

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I say "killawatt" but I say the letter after Juliet as "keelo". But I'm from Texas. :D
 

PrimeNumber

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Meh, we're amateurs. (says so right on the license) Use whatever you want, if the guy on the other end doesn't understand he can always ask for clarification. It is seldom critical.

Now if you're out in the field calling in airstrikes on a target, there isn't room for any do-overs and you're (here's the important part) a professional, OK then, standardization to the extreme is probably a good thing.

Having said that, I stick to the NATO phonetics. Probably as close to "universally understood" as anything short of a Star Trek translator, and it never sounds cutesy or chicken band-ish. Just one less thing for me to screw up. If the other guy wants to say "Whacky Six Sugar Fluffy Kitty" it doesn't bother me a bit. The contact will still go in my log, and he'll still get a QSL card a few days later.
 
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