LADD for traffic info

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robertmac

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Just spent a couple of weeks out to west coast and back. Now largely a radio RF dead zone of listening. Very little ham outside Vancouver, the Island and Kamloops. Some fire and RCMP on island thank goodness. And BCAS. Thank goodness for that as I knew what areas to avoid. Some fire and I thought RCMP around Abbotsford but not sure as was driving and not looking at radio. Some railroad but that doesn't help tell what areas on highway are problems. Also thank goodness for BC Highways as kept me up to date with weather, road conditions and accidents while travelling Trans Canada. Lack of information is largely frustrating.
 

NedSem

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Just spent a couple of weeks out to west coast and back. Now largely a radio RF dead zone of listening. Very little ham outside Vancouver, the Island and Kamloops. Some fire and RCMP on island thank goodness. And BCAS. Thank goodness for that as I knew what areas to avoid. Some fire and I thought RCMP around Abbotsford but not sure as was driving and not looking at radio. Some railroad but that doesn't help tell what areas on highway are problems. Also thank goodness for BC Highways as kept me up to date with weather, road conditions and accidents while travelling Trans Canada. Lack of information is largely frustrating.


The LADD frequencies are a good source for highway info.


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robertmac

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The LADD frequencies are a good source for highway info.


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Never heard a beep. Problem with LADD is language and generally short range. At least with BC Highways, I was able to stop at a rest stop [very few open in winter] for an hour and then proceed hoping problem had been rectified. It was to a point and no line up. Had to slow down as they were still recovering the vehicle. From the time I started travelling to the time I came to the accident was 30 mins.. And nothing heard on any of the trucker frequencies, no warnings, in fact, no chatter at all coming back to Alberta. Only thing I heard was when I got to Alberta and a trucker said there were police [well bears] around Revelstoke.
 

NedSem

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Strange - I listen to LADD up the canyon and the Coq all the time - unless it is an extremely fresh incident I can't recall coming across something without first hearing about it on Ladd. Mind you I usually travel early morning or late evening when there are lots of truckers on the road. Even listening to them from home in the Valley I can get a good idea what the road and traffic conditions are up both routes.
 

BC_Scan

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robertmac said:
Just spent a couple of weeks out to west coast and back. Now largely a radio RF dead zone of listening. Very little ham outside Vancouver, the Island and Kamloops. Some fire and RCMP on island thank goodness. And BCAS. Thank goodness for that as I knew what areas to avoid. Some fire and I thought RCMP around Abbotsford but not sure as was driving and not looking at radio. Some railroad but that doesn't help tell what areas on highway are problems. Also thank goodness for BC Highways as kept me up to date with weather, road conditions and accidents while travelling Trans Canada. Lack of information is largely frustrating.
I'm sorry you feel that way, I must disagree, there is so much to list to. You obviously have the wrong freqs plugged in. I routinely take two scanners three diff radios affixed to the car , skiing trips to Vernon, Big white, Apex, & Revelstoke, constantly here from Vancouver thru Fraser Valley thru Hwy 3 or Coquihalla, never a dull moment LADD 1-4 constantly busy as the truckers know where and when.

What I have found is that they are using via old Tad progammable radios is other simplex freqs,I constantly use close call to find other freqs that truckers use. I have found one group using f bombs and everything on the Canada wide National SARIAN IAF freq,
so Its a pirate soup in the wild west. So if you want to meet I can upgrade your freq list so you are never in the dark again.
 
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kayn1n32008

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Im sorry you feel that , way I must disagree, there is so much to list to ,you obviously have the wrong freqs plugged in. I routinely take two scanners three diff radios affixed to the car , skiing trips to Vernon, Big white, Apex, & Revelstoke, constantly here from Vancouver thru Fraser Valley thru Hwy 3 or Coquihalla, never a dull moment LADD 1-4 constantly busy as the truckers know where and when
what I have found is that they are using via old Tad progammable radios is other simplex freqs,I constantly use close call to find other freqs that truckers use. I have found one group using f bombs and everything on the Canada wide National SARIAN IAF freq,
so Its a pirate soup in the wild west. So if you want to meet I can upgrade your freq list so you are never in the dark again.
I have followed truckers to channels being used outside their allowed area/use. Once working near Golden at an accident, a couple guys in the lineup went to 'Plateau' (153.635) to chat. Plateau Logging is a compant near Prince George. You amost have to have a scanner dedicated to searching 137 to 174 in BC when travelling the highways to find accident info if you can't hear it on LAD 1-4.
 

Jay911

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I usually find if I try to listen to LAD, one of two things happens:

1. I grow weary of the CB Ch 6 type mouths and conversations in about 0.0025 seconds.

2. I don't speak or understand the language being hollered at 110dB into the mic (and I understand several languages, including both our country's official ones).
 

robertmac

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I usually find if I try to listen to LAD, one of two things happens:

1. I grow weary of the CB Ch 6 type mouths and conversations in about 0.0025 seconds.

2. I don't speak or understand the language being hollered at 110dB into the mic (and I understand several languages, including both our country's official ones).
I have to agree with both these statements. And really why I hate seeing encryption coming in. Unfortunately encryption is on the wrong service.
On the way out, I did hear some truckers on all the LADD 1-4, including 173.37 in BC. And of course it was filled with the CB language. At least there were no accidents or problems going out. I reviewed my list of frequencies and thought I had 153.635 in but I see I don't. As I said above, the only thing I heard [and this was Sunday] on any LADD was when I got into Alberta and the one report about bears around Revelstoke which I hadn't seen a number of hours previously. And this was before seeing bears in the usual spot around Banff, but no reports of that. I originally thought may have antenna problem but was picking up the 146.88 repeater and the Highway repeaters which I heard a lot of information both on the island and mainland. What I have done in the past is listen to RCMP on one bank while scanning on another. With RCMP, I would move according to area or activity heard when scanning. Of course that is useless now. On the next trip I will listen to the BC Highways according to area and scan on the other and stop if I hear chatter about problem areas. I went through each area on RR to get frequencies as well as repeater book and BC amateur coordination for frequencies along the way.
I usually don't have the luxury of listening to numerous scanners as family is usually present. I listen to one radio with an ear plug.
With RCMP gone, this will free up a number of frequencies to be replaced with others. So other than the 4 LADD frequencies, 153.635, and the other Alberta Frequencies used by truckers, what would be the most frequently used by truckers in BC? I do have a list of Interior and Northern BC Logging Road frequencies and will review this and input those frequencies listed for Trans Canada. As well, I do have a list of the common frequencies on an IC license.
 

masonb

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The RR & LADD channels are used but not nearly as much as the older 'chatter' channels such as Blackwater, Elko, Spud, SWAN, Polar, Anzac, Mullen, Twilight, Bond, LadyFern, Kicker, Weibo, Drake, Bomber, Chopstick, Teardrop the list goes on. I'm counting 226 just analogs in my list excluding the new RR's. There is still a lot of traffic on the air. When I travel from Calgary to the west coast my radio is rarely idle.
 

Cognomen

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What I have found is that they are using via old Tad progammable radios is other simplex freqs,
I have a Tad M8, given to me by a trucker friend when he retired (came back to BC from Alberta and got into some other work). I should power it up and see what's in it.
 

robertmac

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The RR & LADD channels are used but not nearly as much as the older 'chatter' channels such as Blackwater, Elko, Spud, SWAN, Polar, Anzac, Mullen, Twilight, Bond, LadyFern, Kicker, Weibo, Drake, Bomber, Chopstick, Teardrop the list goes on. I'm counting 226 just analogs in my list excluding the new RR's. There is still a lot of traffic on the air. When I travel from Calgary to the west coast my radio is rarely idle.
I have a number of these entered as in Alberta a lot of these frequencies are for fire departments, farmers, Firenet, Forestry and other public services. Can't say I have all of them but as I stated going out, there was chatter on most but filled with swearing and non traffic information. More about their girl friends, wives, or the girl at the restaurant. Coming back on the Sunday, basically nothing. There was a lot of chatter including 154.1 on the Island and lower Mainland, up to Hope, but from there until Banff, other than the BC Highways and BCAS, nothing in a 9 hour drive. Of course posting their names doesn't help a lot of people, but I do have list of frequencies that correspond to these company names.
 
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kayn1n32008

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I have a number of these entered as in Alberta a lot of these frequencies are for fire departments, farmers, Firenet, Forestry and other public services.
With out him adding frequency info, the names are not overly relevant.

For sure a lot of frequencies used in BC may or may not be public safety/farming/business. It might as well be different countries when it comes to frequency assignment between BC and Alberta.

Of course posting their names doesn't help a lot of people, but I do have list of frequencies that correspond to these company names.

Would you care to share your frequency list? Very interested in what you have corresponding to the names.


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dwc

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Would you care to share your frequency list? Very interested in what you have corresponding to the names.
These lists are widely available all over the googles. This particular radio shop publishes a list, as do a few others;

Alberta/BC Roadlist

I posted this on here a number of years ago;

http://members.shaw.ca/ve6tmk/truckwest.html

Good story about truckers causing inteference to emergency services in Alberta. The frequency 'ARROW NORTH' they refer to in the article is 155.19 MHz.
 

robertmac

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One I use, and you probably have it, comes off of a license. Here is one from 2012 that states where these frequencies are authorized: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11098.html
This is a link just to the Resource Road: https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11127.html
https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11095.html
I tend to believe the IC lists more than what can be obtained from various trucker frequencies. The lists from trucker sites, 4x4 sites, outdoors hunting sites often do not indicate the restrictions as to where the frequencies can be used. And listening to a number of these frequencies, it is apparent that current users do not know where they can be used.
Here is a non IC lists: http://jonnys.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Radio-Frequencies.pdf
I had a list similar to the Vector one which listed according to name and frequency. But I cannot locate it.
I had talked to Fern, prior to his very unfortunate accident.
 
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dwc

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One I use, and you probably have it, comes off of a license. Here is one from 2012 that states where these frequencies are authorized: http://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11098.html
This is a link just to the Resource Road: https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11127.html
https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/smt-gst.nsf/eng/sf11095.html
I tend to believe the IC lists more than what can be obtained from various trucker frequencies. The lists from trucker sites, 4x4 sites, outdoors hunting sites often do not indicate the restrictions as to where the frequencies can be used. And listening to a number of these frequencies, it is apparent that current users do not know where they can be used.
Here is a non IC lists: http://jonnys.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/Radio-Frequencies.pdf
I had a list similar to the Vector one which listed according to name and frequency. But I cannot locate it.
I had talked to Fern, prior to his very unfortunate accident.
Yeah the licensing process is pretty straightforward. When you apply for a mobile license, you specify *one* frequency you wish to use (i.e Ladd 1, Ladd 2, etc). Then on the application form you are given the option to add appendices like 1, 6, etc. When your application is approved, paid for and you receive your license, the appendices are included on the license. Each frequency lists the geographical area/restrictions on the license as well.

This is all fine and dandy but the problem is that no one explains the importance of these geographical restrictions to the licensee. They just toss the license in their glove box and forget about it. So really this comes down to an education piece.
 

robertmac

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Well, I have seen IC discussions and explanations of this in Trucker magazines. So I suspect some do choice to ignore. And one of the reasons on RR I try to explain that frequencies are assigned by IC [or what ever it is called today] for a specific area. With other groups buying CCR and just using any frequency they want, I would hope that RR or people on these threads would try and explain the proper use of radio frequencies. I wonder if the places that truckers get these radios programmed explain about their restrictions. I would hope so. But again, I often don't bother listening to these often profanity filled conversations. But when on the roads, I hope to hear some decent conversations and road reports. I wonder about the activity today on Highway 5 this afternoon with the accident? I shouldn't be surprised as even when people get drivers license they tend to ignore everything they learned.
 

kayn1n32008

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This is all fine and dandy but the problem is that no one explains the importance of these geographical restrictions to the licensee. They just toss the license in their glove box and forget about it. So really this comes down to an education piece.

There is an industrial landfill I know(here in Alberta) that uses LAD2(not a legit road channel anywhere in Alberta) for the access road and LAD 3 for on site operations. Their portables, and mobiles were purchased from a dealer near where the landfill is, and did the programming.

It is not just the truckers that mis-use these channels, it can also be communications companies too.



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