Law Enforcement Professionals on RR

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AB4BF

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I was a law enforcement officer in South Carolina from 1975 to 1978. After "finding" this site, I have noticed there are a lot of law enforcement professionals on this site and knowing this has made me feel like I am among friends and brothers. I'm curious as to how many are cops, deputies, HP and others including federal; current, retired and former who have gone on to other endeavors. You guys should be proud.
I got into scanning in 1979, listening to my former co-workers and friends - probably a lot of us have started that way. Have been there ever since. This may have been done before, if so my apologies.
 

SAR923

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Five years with LASO, 1968-1973. That's when we used to wear helmets all the time because pople were ambushing us by dropping concrete blocks on our heads from the roofs of the projects. 23 years as a reserve with Sonoma Co. S.O from 1977 to 2005. Now thankfully retired in nice, quiet Alabama. :)
 

af5rn

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Did four years as an Air Force Security Policeman, then ten years as a police officer and deputy sheriff in Texas. Good times, but not how I want to raise a family. I ended up retiring early as a paramedic after getting injured, got out of public safety altogether, and went back to nursing school. Much better life than as a cop, even if it did land me in Iraq.
 
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DOH6713

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Quote the af5rn....

af5rn said:
Originally Posted by af5rn


I don't give any more of an F what the cops "like" than they care about what I like. If they have nothing better to worry about then how many hobbyists are listening to them making traffic stops and barking dog calls, then obviously our crime problem is solved in this country, and we can start laying some of those useless losers off.


So cops are arseholes. Tell us something we didn't already know.


Oh puhleeze, dude. You're going to tell me that your jurisdiction has hundreds of drug dealers on the streets with Jaguars? How many of those busts have you personally made? Or is that the "people getting poped left and right" you were making up earlier?


Whatever. I know many, many cops, including my best friends. I was one for over a decade. Most of them -- just like firemen and EMTs -- are working only for their own personal fun, not public safety. They were bullies in high school, and couldn't wait to go get a gun and badge to get paid to be a bully. You aren't fooling anybody with that nonsense.
never more...
 
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burner50

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Good... full time LEO's around here... Now if you were only around when I wanted you to be ;)

Hang around some railroad crossings for me guys... I'm sick of killing people just trying to do my job and go home...
 

letarotor

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Duuuhhhh???

I must have just fell off the turnip truck Aaron because I have no idea what DOH9792 is getting at........:)

And to answer the original question, currently serving, 22-years, and hope to be retired from this nasty, thankless business in the next 10-years!!! And please, no thankyous, just doing my job!!!

Burner50: I sympathize, being a conductor has got to be a tough job. But isn't people who try to beat the train and don't make it natures way of culling the herd so to speak???!!!
 
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burner50

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letarotor said:
I must have just fell off the turnip truck Aaron because I have no idea what DOH9792 is getting at........:)

And to answer the original question, currently serving, 22-years, and hope to be retired from this nasty, thankless business in the next 10-years!!! And please, no thankyous, just doing my job!!!

Burner50: I sympathize, being a conductor has got to be a tough job. But isn't people who try to beat the train and don't make it natures way of culling the herd so to speak???!!!
maybe when its in front of somebody else :(
 

trace1

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Well I did 6 years in the US Air Force as a Security Police and then 6 1/2 years with the Dothan Airport Police Department. I got out of it, many years ago, because I was ready for a change but I do still find myself looking for expired license plates, erratic driving and such. I guess once it is in your blood it will always be there.
 

af5rn

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RodStrong said:
Thank you for your service.
Thanks, Bro. I appreciate it. But there's nothing I'd rather be doing.

trace1 said:
...but I do still find myself looking for expired license plates, erratic driving and such. I guess once it is in your blood it will always be there.
LOL! I know the feeling! Old habits die hard. :lol:
 

N2MWE

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25 years with the NYS Courts Department of Public Safety...with seven more to go (age requirement). Worked in two extremely nasty and busy commands...now I'm ending my career in a very quiet command.
Welcome aboard, Brother.
 

Austin4Wyo

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letarotor said:
Burner50: I sympathize, being a conductor has got to be a tough job. But isn't people who try to beat the train and don't make it natures way of culling the herd so to speak???!!!
I'm speculating, but somehow, I doubt the thought of nature culling the herd makes anyone in that situation feel very good about the end result. That rationalization isn't much help for a person with a good conscience, methinks.
 

b7spectra

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Never worked as an LEO, but was "deputized" when I spent 9 years as a paramedic (an non-related injury took me out of public service) so we could place juveniles into protective custody so we could treat them if we couldn't find a parent. Have to admit it, working the streets was the most fun job I ever had!

To ALL you LEO's out there - stay safe and make sure before every shift, you tell your loved ones that you love them!
 

letarotor

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Cynicism is part of the job.

"I'm speculating, but somehow, I doubt the thought of nature culling the herd makes anyone in that situation feel very good about the end result. That rationalization isn't much help for a person with a good conscience, methinks."

If you end up staying in this business long enough Austin4Wyo you have to develop a certain level of detachment. If you don't the job will literally kill you. Doctors, nurses, police officers, firemen, paramedics and other professionals who have to deal with tragic death and injury on a daily basis must develop some kind of skills to deal with it, or they will undoubtedly develop ulcers or become alcoholics. Also, another facet of the job is that nearly everyone lies, or intentionally omit relevant facts that would aid in an investigation. Even good people, when they are caught at their worst, will lie through their teeth to a police officer, and yes, even their paramedic or doctor (which I find absolutely fascinating and incredibly stupid)! It's very frustrating and aggravating for these professionals. Some of us become more cynical than others about it. It's a way to cope, and yes it probably seems very crass to an outsider. Someone driving into the path of a train is certainly tragic for the loved ones they leave behind, there is no denying that. It’s also a very emotional experience for a train conductor, and those I have talked to never shake the experience. Burner50 can probably elaborate further on this subject because I gather it has happened to him many times. So being the cynical person that the job has helped turn me into, I have a saying that I believe is very apropos to this discussion: "If you are going to be stupid, you had better be tough!"


Mark
 

xusmarine1979

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4 yrs with the PMO (USMC) as a handler, reserve with the county S.O. before the Mrs. and I got hitched and now the head of security for a great company that makes hotdogs and bacon!
 

Airdorn

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I was brought-up to always hate and be suspicious of the cops.

Now I know that that attitude is almost always entirely unfounded. Every LEO I've ever met have been professional and reasonably courteous -- even when I was being arrested for driving on a suspended license back in 1996!
 
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Austin4Wyo

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letarotor said:
"I'm speculating, but somehow, I doubt the thought of nature culling the herd makes anyone in that situation feel very good about the end result. That rationalization isn't much help for a person with a good conscience, methinks."

If you end up staying in this business long enough Austin4Wyo you have to develop a certain level of detachment. If you don't the job will literally kill you. Doctors, nurses, police officers, firemen, paramedics and other professionals who have to deal with tragic death and injury on a daily basis must develop some kind of skills to deal with it, or they will undoubtedly develop ulcers or become alcoholics. Also, another facet of the job is that nearly everyone lies, or intentionally omit relevant facts that would aid in an investigation. Even good people, when they are caught at their worst, will lie through their teeth to a police officer, and yes, even their paramedic or doctor (which I find absolutely fascinating and incredibly stupid)! It's very frustrating and aggravating for these professionals. Some of us become more cynical than others about it. It's a way to cope, and yes it probably seems very crass to an outsider. Someone driving into the path of a train is certainly tragic for the loved ones they leave behind, there is no denying that. It’s also a very emotional experience for a train conductor, and those I have talked to never shake the experience. Burner50 can probably elaborate further on this subject because I gather it has happened to him many times. So being the cynical person that the job has helped turn me into, I have a saying that I believe is very apropos to this discussion: "If you are going to be stupid, you had better be tough!"


Mark

I'm fully aware, and have always assumed that. Having family in both fire and law enforcement work while I was growing up left me with plenty of times to reflect on that aspect of things, if only vicariously.

The particular statement is what I was questioning. How a person chooses to deal with the situations at hand is very personal, and I won't be at all judgmental about it; however, I found the idea of "culling the herd" to be a rather crass rationalization for the gravity of the consequence of so many others' actions. That particular approach isn't one that was taken by my dad or stepdad, and it seemed pretty dismissive of the fact that these are lives affected and lives lost. The understanding that lives are at hand is what drove my dad and stepdad; saying that the nature is "culling the herd" is seems to be rather opposite of that approach.

But like I said, it's a very personal thing. If that particular rationalization allows you to do your job well and keeps you sane, then you have to go with what works. Hope that clears some things up for ya.
 

af5rn

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Austin4Wyo said:
That particular approach isn't one that was taken by my dad or stepdad...
I'd be willing to bet that you are not fully aware of what their approach was. Not a slam on you personally, or them either for that matter. Just saying that we all put on a public face -- even with our families -- that is not necessarily indicative of what's really going on in our heads.
 
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