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Long Distance CB reception today!

dragon48

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East Hampton, N.Y. 14:50 UTC. Picking up somebody chatting from Montgomery, Alabama on 27.0250 Mhz A.M., on my AOR 8200 MK11, using a normal telescoping antenna.

Nice to get out of the city. This is >1,100 miles away. Is this considered normal, or do conditions make the band open today?
 
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conditions make the band open today
It's based upon various factors like Sunspot activity.

Read here:



"Systematic study of solar activity began around 1750. Long-term sunspot activity varies in cycles. On average, the number of sunspots reaches a maximum every 11 years, but the period has varied from 7 to 17 years. The first cycle to be completely and scientifically observed began in 1755; we know it as Cycle 1. We are now just starting Cycle 23. Solar activity also follows a 27-day cycle: the sun's rotational period. "

 
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Whiskey3JMC

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East Hampton, N.Y. 14:50 UTC. Picking up somebody chatting from Montgomery, Alabama on 27.0250 Mhz A.M., on my AOR 8200 MK11, using a normal telescoping antenna.

Nice to get out of the city. This is >1,100 miles away. Is this considered normal, or do conditions make the band open today?
This is CB Channel 6, known as the "Super Bowl". The operators on that channel run some illegal power on their rigs. Never know who or what you'll hear there
 

ka3jjz

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Solar activity really hasn't been that high yet. The latest flux is 68 with only a few A class (mini) flares, according to Spaceweather. We are supposed to get hit with a solar wind stream in the next day or two.

However sporadic E is known to affect 10 meter signals, and if it goes low enough CB signals too. There appears to be an inverse relationship between sporadic E and solar activity - when there's little activity, sporadic E can happen. When there's a lot of solar activity, it happens far less frequently. The reason for this is not yet clear.

Glenn Hauser in his WoR reflector has been talking about 10 meter E in his reflector over the last week or two.

Mike
 

GB46

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This is CB Channel 6, known as the "Super Bowl". The operators on that channel run some illegal power on their rigs. Never know who or what you'll hear there
Yes, I hear lots of activity on that channel up here in BC, most of which is from California or Nevada. As for high power, some of them reach full scale on my S meter. They usually overmodulate, and their audio often splatters onto adjacent channels, too. With that kind of audio it's pretty hard to understand what the operators are saying.

During the early 90s, when I lived in Saskatchewan, I had a sideband CB transceiver. It was a stock rig with no modifications, and I didn't have a linear amplifier, but during skip conditions I was able to contact CBers all over the southern U.S. My antenna, by the way, was only a fiberglass marine whip mounted on the eaves of the house about 10 ft. above the ground.
 

ka3jjz

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You were in the days when the flux was in the high 100s or low 200s . You had very good F layer propagation in those days. Now you gotta guess if the E layer gods are going to smile on you......Mike
 

GB46

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You were in the days when the flux was in the high 100s or low 200s . You had very good F layer propagation in those days. Now you gotta guess if the E layer gods are going to smile on you......Mike
They can smile all they like, but I'm no longer on CB, and have no transmit capability. Even if I did, there would be the problem of getting an antenna outside of this apartment. In the 70s I lived in a high-rise on the 21st floor. It was a huge suite with two separate balconies, and I strapped a little back-of-the-set CB whip to a railing on the unused balcony, running the coax through a partially open balcony door, along the baseboard heating openings on the inside walls, then into the living room. Not sure if I caused any TVI, but all the building's TV cable outlets were connected to a shared rooftop antenna system, not to a cable TV service. I made lots of contacts.
 

dragon48

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I also picked up Mississippi and Central Florida on the same frequency, shortly after my initial post. One of the conversations appeared to be trucker traffic. The initial one was a very happy guy wishing everybody a happy 4th of July.

I'm going to pick up a pair of handheld CB's to try and make some long-distance contacts.
 

GB46

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I'm going to pick up a pair of handheld CB's to try and make some long-distance contacts.
Make sure to get on high ground and away from obstructions when you use a handheld one, since they typically run less power than the base units, and their antennas tend to be limited, too. I'm not sure if any of them support sideband, but that would likely improve your chances of making long-distance contacts. Channel 38 (27.385 lower sideband) is where most of the action is. I've also noticed that the sidebanders seem more well-behaved than CBers on the AM channels.
 

p1879

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sideband is for skip-shooters , as the gentleman said. You might be happier with a small ssb mobile unit with a good small 12v battery, and a dipole or end-fed antenna for some hilltop fun. If you have a old packframe, you can have a pauper's manpack radio. Handheld 11m dx has been done, but your odds improve with a quality antenna system, at least. Some might agree that most 11m handheld DX is just on the rx end, usually. This might be the good part: some extreme dx stories from the gallery, fire away!
 

robertmac

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It's based upon various factors like Sunspot activity

"Systematic study of solar activity began around 1750. Long-term sunspot activity varies in cycles. On average, the number of sunspots reaches a maximum every 11 years, but the period has varied from 7 to 17 years. The first cycle to be completely and scientifically observed began in 1755; we know it as Cycle 1. We are now just starting Cycle 23. Solar activity also follows a 27-day cycle: the sun's rotational period. "

And here I thought we were out of Solar Cycle 24 and entering Solar Cycle 25.
 

bill4long

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The DX you are encountering has nothing to do with sun spots or the solar cycle.
It's E-layer skip and is created by certain weather conditions, common in the summer on 11 meters (CB), 10 meters and 6 meters.
 
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GB46

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sideband is for skip-shooters , as the gentleman said. You might be happier with a small ssb mobile unit with a good small 12v battery, and a dipole or end-fed antenna for some hilltop fun. If you have a old packframe, you can have a pauper's manpack radio. Handheld 11m dx has been done, but your odds improve with a quality antenna system, at least. Some might agree that most 11m handheld DX is just on the rx end, usually. This might be the good part: some extreme dx stories from the gallery, fire away!
Well, I once heard a guy down in California coming in here at S-9+, who claimed he was on a bicycle on the Golden Gate Bridge and transmitting on a toy walkie-talkie. Yeah, right! :LOL:
 

GB46

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Some might agree that most 11m handheld DX is just on the rx end, usually.
Right, and any portable radio can achieve long-distance CB reception during skip conditions with just the built-in whip antenna. In fact, during the early days there were little 100 milliwatt walkie-talkies that had simple regenerative receivers. I had several of those, and could always hear stations I could never hope to contact.

One of those walkie-talkies was a so-called "Dick Tracy Wrist Radio". Tracy must have had one enormous wrist, as the unit consisted of a rather thick 2-inch loudspeaker (used also as the microphone) strapped to the wrist and wired remotely to the actual radio, which was even bigger and meant to be clipped onto a belt around the waist. I eventually took all of that apart and mounted the guts of the thing in an aluminum box so as to create a "base rig", to which I connected a long wire. This increased the range, but not by much, just a mile or two more than the original few blocks.

My big mistake was using a larger battery instead of the little 9v. one. It would have worked, if I hadn't connected two lantern batteries in series; 12v. was too high a voltage, and the rig stopped working. I started poking around inside the cabinet to investigate and promptly burned my fingers on one of the transistors, which was now toast. Back then I knew nothing about thermal runaway, as I was used to working with tube circuitry.
 

wtp

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those guys you hear are probably putting out hundreds or thousands of watts.
you might think along those lines for power to talk back.
 

GB46

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those guys you hear are probably putting out hundreds or thousands of watts. you might think along those lines for power to talk back.
Not for me, as apartment living makes it out of the question to even transmit on a atock rig with legal power, considering the antenna restrictions here. I'm just a listener nowadays. CB is an interesting daytime alternative when I can't hear much on the lower shortwave bands.

Some of the sideband CBers are way off frequency, judging from their voice pitch, often 100 to 200 hz too high or too low, while the people they're talking to are either right on frequency or off a bit in the other direction. It can't be on my end, because my receiver is properly aligned and very stable. Possibly they're using VFOs or modified ham rigs.
 

RichardKramer

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While there are some modified rigs being used on 11mtr cb, all cb radios that have ssb have a clarifier knob. Ssb transmitters vary from several hundred hertz below the actual freq for LSB, above the actual freq for USB, so you need the clarifier to adjust to the actual freq.

Rich - N3VMY - KAG0096
 

dragon48

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Apr 16, 2014
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New York N.Y.
Starting to have some fun, but haven't made any contacts yet:

I bought a pair of Uniden PRO401HHs. In my NYC apartment, with the stock antennas, I've picked up some clear traffic (01:00 - 03:00 UTC) on channels 6, 38, and 31. Nobody was giving up their 20 or any clue as to where they were. I made some calls out to test the equipment, but the 4 watts wasn't enough to penetrate all the sources of city interference and nobody answered me.

I bought a pair of 42.5 inch ABBREE Tactical Antennas and will taking the setup to a rural area next week. I'm going to try and make contacts at various times during the day. I'm also going to see how far these can talk to each other.

What do you guys think? How far away will the units be able to talk to each other and what's the longest distance contact I can get? I'm hoping and assuming that I'll get much more distance than the shorter waves of FM FRS. I once did an experiment up in the mountains and couldn't get more than 1.3 miles of clear reception between a base receiver and a cheap bubble pack FRS, even though I was travelling in a straight line without obstructions. Recently in the country with a more powerful 5 watt setup, I couldn't get more than .75 of a mile (between two units) on either FRS or 151.82 MURS.
 
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