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Low Power Transmitter Freq Read in 2.4 gHz range

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KK4JUG

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I don't know where else to put this question.

I'm trying to determine the exact frequencies of some of the wireless devices I use in my band. Each of the guitars and my mandolin have wireless transmitters. The specs for the transmitters say only 2.4 gHz. We will be adding some additional wireless equipment for the wireless in-ear monitors and I'm concerned about interference.

I have a Sure Com SF-401 Plus frequency meter that works quite well for my other radios but the instrument transmitters only have a range of about 50 feet +/- so they can't be more than 100 mw or so and won't trigger the freq meter. I've even tried reading the frequency immediately after a full charge to assure optimum power from the transmitters with no luck. Specs from the manufacturer are no help. I have no way of hooking up the meter directly because the antennae are wired in,

I may be answering my own question but is there any way to measure the frequencies short of spending big bucks on a freq meter (which ain't gonna happen).
 
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ko6jw_2

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These sound like Bluetooth devices especially the IEM's. Bluetooth automatically picks an unused frequency. The manufacturer only specifies the general frequency because it will vary in actual use. Drones do the same thing. Also wireless routers etc. There are a finite number of channels so if you have too many devices you may have an issue.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Most of this equipment utilizes some form of frequency hopping or spread spectrum. Unless the equipment has some user accessible frequency adjustment there is little you can do with a frequency counter.
 

KK4JUG

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I forgot to mention that each has 4 selectable channels so I don't think it's frequency hopping.
 

KK4JUG

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I'm gonna be a bystander on this one because I don't understand the concept of frequency hopping enough to discuss it.

(Where's Hedy Lamarr when you need her? :))
 

ko6jw_2

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Further research indicates that these are not Bluetooth although they are in the same frequency area. You might want to contact Sweetwater. They sell all sorts of wireless music and microphone equipment. A quick look indicates that the number of channels varies and the more channels you want to use the more expensive the equipment will be. Recently had dealings with Sweetwater and they are very helpful. Not operating are full capacity during the present emergency, but went out of their way to fill my order.
 

KK4JUG

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Sweetwater is my usual go-to supplier. I've purchased everything from capos to mixers from them. I'm sure I will ultimately buy the equipment from them. I've done some further research and the wireless monitors I want are in the 538-554 mHz range. While I may not be the brightest light in the harbor, I don't think it will be a problem. Perhaps I was being overly cautious but 2 grand is a lot of money and since everyone is staying home, we're not playing and, thus, not making any money.
 

RFI-EMI-GUY

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Further research indicates that these are not Bluetooth although they are in the same frequency area. You might want to contact Sweetwater. They sell all sorts of wireless music and microphone equipment. A quick look indicates that the number of channels varies and the more channels you want to use the more expensive the equipment will be. Recently had dealings with Sweetwater and they are very helpful. Not operating are full capacity during the present emergency, but went out of their way to fill my order.
If you look up the FCC ID for the devices the test data will give some indication of the modulation and the channel access scheme. If it is CDMA like WiFi it will have a wide bandwidth that your frequency counter cannot resolve. If it is narrow, it might be frequency hopping spread spectrum that likewise a frequency counter her cannot track. A spectrum analyser might tell you more,
 

KK4JUG

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Thanx, guys. I've decided there shouldn't be a problem. Our mics are in the 614 mHz range; the instrument transmitters are 2.4 gHz; and the wireless monitors will be around 538+ mHz. I say "shouldn't be a problem" but I'm also familiar with Murphy's Law. We'll be keeping good ole-fashioned wire around just in case.

n5ims, I got it. Harvey Korman was one of my favorites.
 

KK4JUG

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Are you asking me to second-guess the FCC?

If I read the paperwork right, our mic system uses replaceable modules in each mic that will allow us to transplant new ones if something fails. I assume we could also change the frequency but that doesn't account for the "base unit." The receiver, or rather, receivers because there are four, are in one rack-mounted unit. I can't help but think the whole system might have to be replaced if the FCC starts fiddling with the the frequencies again, something I certainly don't look forward to. That's more $$$. We're goin' broke gettin' famous. :)
 

ecps92

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What Jay was getting at is

there had been [I forget how long ago, but within the past 10 yrs] a shuffle of wireless frequencies and
the FCC ordered some of them vacated, but we know what will occur, and there still will be orphans.

So becareful as the frequencies you had, may belong to someone/something else now and you are interfering with them

Mr Goggle tells me, your 600 MHz items are no-longer valid Per the FCC
Are you asking me to second-guess the FCC?

If I read the paperwork right, our mic system uses replaceable modules in each mic that will allow us to transplant new ones if something fails. I assume we could also change the frequency but that doesn't account for the "base unit." The receiver, or rather, receivers because there are four, are in one rack-mounted unit. I can't help but think the whole system might have to be replaced if the FCC starts fiddling with the the frequencies again, something I certainly don't look forward to. That's more $$$. We're goin' broke gettin' famous. :)
 

KK4JUG

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Okay, I understand, Bill. I checked with one of the other band members and these are supposed to be in the range that is still permissible. The rack-mounted receiver does not show the actual frequency being transmitted by any mic. (The wireless monitor transmitter does show the frequency being broadcast to the individual monitors.) I'll see if I can determine the exact frequencies of the mics lest I become a pain in the (choose body part) when dealing with the sales people.
 
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