Making cable.

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Megahurtz

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JEFA Tech: Low Loss 400 Coax - By The Foot

Advertised to be 59c a foot, which is cheaper than the (around) $1/ft real LMR-400 is. Also claims to be USA made.

Now, would it be more beneficial to have the company install the connectors?

I will need about 30 foot of cable for my run, at 59c a foot that is $17.70.

To have it made with connectors, it would be $39.70.

The connectors are about $3.00 each, so the labor would only be $16. The crimp tool itself is around $30, and a stripper about the same.

Would be worth it to buy the tools if I was doing this all the time, but I hope the cable is "one and done".

Before anyone insults the cable, I've read really good reviews about it on other ham sites.
 

wx5uif

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I have a 75 ft run of that cable on my 800mhz antenna. I'm very happy with it.

I opted to have them install the ends. I'm sure they would do a better job than I would.
 

mmckenna

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Unless you plan on doing connections frequently, get the company to install them for you. It's not difficult to do yourself if you have the correct tools, but if you screw up a crimp connector, you'll need a new one.

If you really are going to do this once, no need to spend $60 on the tools and a few extra connectors.
 

Megahurtz

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Also, what is a good sealant to put on the connecting end? I'm looking for something that can be "re-used" as I am moving in a year.
 

n5ims

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Installing the connectors after running the cable can often make for a cleaner install job. The holes needed to run the cable into the house (room, etc.) would need to be about twice the size if the connectors are on than if it's just the raw cable. I often just install the connector that's outside (so I don't fumble around doing so up on the tower, roof, etc.) and leave the inside one off until I have everything pulled and routed where it goes and then install the inside one. Put a small amount of caulk around where the coax enters the house (under the eves if possible to reduce moisture) and things are tight and look nice.

The few times I installed with connector attached, there was much more caulk needed and the larger hole let the coax wiggle around enough so insects had a path to the attic after a short while. Running just the coax in later installs have made for a much better fit and no more wasps attacking me in the attic.
 
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