Marine channels in NJ Transit radio

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jaymatt1978

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A few weeks ago a NJ Transit railroad crew was working in Park Ridge,. I gota glance at the front of the radio and they had marine channels 13,16 and a few others. I wonder what channel would be used around the bridges?? Is it 13??Also if anyone has the ful plan I would love to see it. Thanks
 

cknizeski

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here is a list of marine channels and thier usage: U.S. VHF Channels - USCG Navigation Center
I am not sure what you mean by channales used around the bridges. Channel 16 is the international calling and distress channel requred to be monitored by all commerical ships, 9 is used as the recreational calling channel, 13 is your bridge to bridge used to pass navigational info from ship ship is also monitored by commerical vessels. 13 is also used by many draw and swing bridge operators to request openings.
 

byndhlptom

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Marine channels in RR engine

I believe that you may be assuming that since the radio displayed 13 & 16 channel numbers that they are marine freqs. The RR channels are in their own block (around 161 Mhz), and are not the same as marine. Many of the "zones" on a RR system are split freq, ie, they talk on one freq and listen on another. The radios usually have separate channel selectors for RX & TX

tom
 

kb2vxa

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AAR channel 13 is used by Amtrak Passenger services and 16 by Metro North at Grand Central Terminal, neither of which are used by NJT. While it is possible to program marine channels in a railroad radio and vice versa being the bands are so close I don't see why they would bother with them being they communicate with their bridge tenders on the appropriate road channel. (I hear them talking with Brielle all the time.)

Now you have me wondering why you posted the question. I would have asked a few discreet questions on the spot had I been fortunate enough to get a good look at the radio and reported back here with anything unusual.
 

Pennywise

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I checked the FCC marine frequency gen-men database & it appears that the three most utilized frequencies for railroad bridge tender to watercraft communications are 156.8 MHz (Chan #16) Emergency & Hailing Use 156.45 Mhz (Chan #9) Commercial & Non-commercial Hailing Use & 156.65 Mhz (Chan #13) Intership Safety & Navigation Use. Some railroads also include 156.7 Mhz (Chan #14) Port Use & 156.9 Mhz (Chan #18A) Commercial working use for "God Know what" Maybe that RCA guy can reveal what the story is with that since he lives in joisy.
 
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N_Jay

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Did the radio say "Marine Ch 16", or something like that, or did it show the frequency?
If not maybe a little more on how you know that they were marine channels may help.
 

n5ims

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Where is a moderator when you need onew?
To report a post to a moderator, simply use the "Report Post" function that's available on each and every post. It's the red and white triangle on the upper right corner of each post. This would handle things much better than starting (or continuing) a flame war by using harsh words in a reply post.
 
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kb2vxa

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"Maybe that RCA guy can reveal what the story is with that since he lives in joisy."
I thought I made it clear I don't have a clue what you guys are on about. All I can tell you is what I know from experience, living at the southern end of the North Jersey Coast Line I've never heard NJT on any marine channel, but read on.

"Let me be clear I know all the marine channels, and my goal is to find out the radio plan for NJ transit."
Easier said than done, while it's easy enough to compile a list of frequencies they're licensed for by transmitter locations when it comes to the trains you have to look at other railroads. They don't always run over their own tracks, they lease rights as well and switch to the appropriate road channel depending on where they're operating. For example down this way they're on 161.235 but when the Hoboken and New York trains get to Rahway they switch to Amtrak on 160.920. Then there is MoW, Power Dispatch and Signal Department having their own channels and don't switch having no need to do so.

That having been said you won't find marine channels in the NJT radio plan, none may be authorized. Now if, and this is a really big IF someone MAY have programmed one or more as "talk around" channels without authorization. Like I said I have heard boats on railroad channels so it just could be radio piracy (illegal operation) can work both ways. If this is the case somebody is looking to have his head handed to him on a platter, FCC rules strictly forbid land mobile use of marine frequencies and shore stations operate under special licenses.

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Relax Justin, this is the last post in this thread you need to read... move on and let them flame each other. Frankly I'm disappointed reading what was posted while I took my sweet time mulling it over and writing this, RR has its moments and a few who don't choose their words and I'm sorry to say you're one of them. Please take the advice given to me some time ago, if you want to fly like an eagle don't run with the turkeys.
 
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Utah_Viper

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There are Railroad swing, and lift bridges. just the same as any other Swing and lift bridge they can be contacted by a vessel (usually on Ch. 13) to have the bridge moved away for passage. I would assume it is helpful for a train to know his bridge is not lowered when approaching.


Amazing how some here can be such asses. If you don't have an answer, or willing to ask respectful questions why bother posting? hopefully my answer helps the OP
 

Alarmguy

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I don't see anything hostile in the original posters post. All he did was ask a question. All he wanted to know was if what or why NJ Transit had marine channels in their radio. Perhaps a better place for this might have been in the NJ forums. Justin google arguing on the internet you might learn something.
 
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Don_Burke

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I doubt the trains are authorized to transmit on the marine vhf channels on a routine basis, although it is possible. IIRC, it is pretty simple for an aircraft to meet the requirements to use some of the marine channels, so it is not too much of a stretch to think there might be similar rules for trains.

It is also possible that they are in there for emergency use only or they might be receive only for the trains.

The hormones are getting a little intense here. Is there a full moon?
 

Alarmguy

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I doubt the trains are authorized to transmit on the marine vhf channels on a routine basis, although it is possible. IIRC, it is pretty simple for an aircraft to meet the requirements to use some of the marine channels, so it is not too much of a stretch to think there might be similar rules for trains.

It is also possible that they are in there for emergency use only or they might be receive only for the trains.

The hormones are getting a little intense here. Is there a full moon?
Sound's like a reasonable answer to me. Even my local PD and FD and EMS have the Railroad frequency in their radio plans, granted its a shortline railroad but they have the capability to transmit. It was mostly for emergency purposes, because years ago the railroad ran double stack containers and tied up all 3 crossings in town at once.
 

kb2vxa

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While there may be certain exceptions I'll not argue minutia but here's the straight dope on NJT Rail Operations and the logic behind it. You're confusing movable highway bridges with railroad spans, both are operated according to traffic flow.

Highway bridges see almost constant road traffic so they're opened upon request when contacted on marine channel 13 reserved for that very purpose. (There is no need to man radio watch on 16 and in fact is only mandated for vessels in excess of 25'.) In summer here at the shore due to heavy traffic they open on schedule which BTW sometimes leads some rich, spoiled brats to hassle the bridge tender. (;->)

On the other hand NJT bridges (and others) remain in the open position and close briefly to allow a train to pass. Obviously seeing little traffic this is the logical way to operate, in addition to signals the engineer is in contact with the bridge tender on the appropriate road channel. Operating in this manner there is no need for a captain to call on his radio to request an opening and the reason why I never hear them on marine channels.

Consider this straight from the horse's mouth as here I am living on an island surrounded by movable bridges at the northern end of the Inland Waterway, I see it and hear the radio traffic all the time. Being a railfan when I'm out and about often I'm on the lookout for trains and Brielle Draw being in plain sight as I cross the tracks makes a good indicator whether or not a train is about to come along. Oh, here comes one now!
 
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radioman2001

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We have put Marine channels in our radios for crews when working on lift and swing bridges. We have a marine bases located in our bridges, so it would stand to reason that if you need to communicate with marine vessels, whether they are Coast Guard or civilian, you will find those channels in their radios.
BTW most portable radios comply with both part 90 and part I believe 88. So you can put them in, but you have to use them for their original intent marine use.
 
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