Marine UHF Frequencies

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JASII

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I have tried searching for this, but I just seem to go down one different "rabbit hole" after another. With regards to the UHF marine frequencies in the 457 mHz area, how are they regulated? Is it by some sort of international agreement? For example, I was on the Norwegian Epic last week. The vessel is not registered in the United States. Do they get, or need, an FCC license for their UHF 457 mHz frequencies or are they covered by some sort of FCC Part that gives them a blanket authorization similar to VHF. I know that I have read it before, either here, on the FCC website or somewhere. Does Part 80, Subpart H allow pretty much any ship, that has an FCC license to use UHF in addition to the more common VHF frequencies? I assume foreign registered vessels don't need a separate FCC license. I they suppose to use those only onboard ship or can they use them so many miles from ship on land?

What about those UHF frequencies in other countries? Are they permitted only aboard ship? Do other countries look the other way?
 

mmckenna

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Not all of the UHF channels are permitted in the USA. They use 10MHz offsets for the repeaters (as opposed to 5MHz offset used on most commercial UHF repeaters in the USA). With the 10MHz offset, some of the repeaters would cause issues on the US GMRS frequencies.

Like all ships, the UHF frequencies would be handled like the VHF marine frequencies. They are licensed either through the country the ship is registered in, or through the home company country. Unlike recreational VHF marine use in the USA, licenses are still required for these "compulsory equipped" ships.
 

BC_Scan

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What i think is that there is an ITU arrangement with any signatory country that is for shipboard comms , freighters tanker, cruise ship etc ,ferry boats that they have 457-& 467 as their point to point comm requirment, I live in a port city and routinely hear shipboard UHF comms, on the usual suspects , 457.525. 457.55 etc. I have been on many cruise ships to many ports . Italy france Caribbean etc, any passing freighter in any port we stopped in would have comms many times in other languages. Our BC Ferries have trbo systems with IC giving license for that use. I have a list somewhere of what Industry Canada shows as freqs for that useage.
 

nd5y

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It appears to be an international allocation subject to regulations in each country.

From the ITU Radio Regulations:
5.287 Use of the frequency bands 457.5125-457.5875 MHz and 467.5125-467.5875 MHz by the maritime mobile service is limited to on-board communication stations. The characteristics of the equipment and the channelling arrangement shall be in accordance with Recommendation ITU-R M.1174-3. The use of these frequency bands in territorial waters is subject to the national regulations of the administration concerned.(WRC-15)

5.288 In the territorial waters of the United States and the Philippines, the preferred frequencies for use by on-board communication stations shall be 457.525 MHz, 457.550 MHz, 457.575 MHz and 457.600 MHz paired, respectively, with 467.750 MHz, 467.775 MHz, 467.800 MHz and 467.825 MHz. The characteristics of the equipment used shall conform to those specified in Recommendation ITU-R M.1174-3. (WRC-15)


ITU-R M.1174-3 (now -4) is available at:

ITU Radio Regulations page is at:
 
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JASII

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Thank you to those who replied. I do appreciate it.

Now, for bonus point:

-Has anybody heard ever monitored any ships using these frequencies on anything other than analog or DMR/MOTO TRBO. (Yes, I get that some are Capacity Plus, not plain DMR, but what I mean is has anybody here monitored APCO P25, NXDN or any other digital modes on ships using those frequencies?)

-Is there any reason that they couldn't use other modes? I mean, if it is by agreement, does the agreement specify emissions, like the FCC licenses do?
 

kayn1n32008

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Just read it. It only specifies bandwidth. It talks about analogue and digital, but does not specify digital emissions.

Cap+/XPT is ideal because you get 2 talk paths per 12.5KHz RF channel and there is no control channel taking up a talk path. I can’t see a ships needs would never exceed the capacity of 3 RF pairs...
 

ecps92

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Right now, I can say the only monitoring/reports have been Analog and DMR

Altho generally reports have been from members on VAC, there may [assumption] be some of the Cargo ships using the local flavor, but Analog does seem to the the most common for older Cruise Lines and Cargo with DMR on the newer Fleet of Cruise ships and Merchant Marine.

Speaking of Merchant Marine, there has been P25 in use, for US Navy and some Merchant Marine, both Conventional and TRS on those same [Fast Food / UHF Maritime pairs]

Thank you to those who replied. I do appreciate it.

Now, for bonus point:

-Has anybody heard ever monitored any ships using these frequencies on anything other than analog or DMR/MOTO TRBO. (Yes, I get that some are Capacity Plus, not plain DMR, but what I mean is has anybody here monitored APCO P25, NXDN or any other digital modes on ships using those frequencies?)

-Is there any reason that they couldn't use other modes? I mean, if it is by agreement, does the agreement specify emissions, like the FCC licenses do?
 

ecps92

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Some Countries are careful [enforcement] and do enforce the US vs International pair usage [Aisa comes to mind] and
are very critical of the Repeater output side. is: 457 Repeater with 467 inputs

I have never seen an FCC or IC license issued for those frequencies, outside of the Fast Food drive-thru's :)

I've heard of some ships having radio zones [US vs Intl] and can turn on/off the Repeaters as needed

Recently [past 2 yrs] I ran across the new SeaSpan fleet, being able to run multiple Repeater pairs, to eliminate near-by interference
from other Cargo Ships and/or Cruise ships


I have tried searching for this, but I just seem to go down one different "rabbit hole" after another. With regards to the UHF marine frequencies in the 457 mHz area, how are they regulated? Is it by some sort of international agreement? For example, I was on the Norwegian Epic last week. The vessel is not registered in the United States. Do they get, or need, an FCC license for their UHF 457 mHz frequencies or are they covered by some sort of FCC Part that gives them a blanket authorization similar to VHF. I know that I have read it before, either here, on the FCC website or somewhere. Does Part 80, Subpart H allow pretty much any ship, that has an FCC license to use UHF in addition to the more common VHF frequencies? I assume foreign registered vessels don't need a separate FCC license. I they suppose to use those only onboard ship or can they use them so many miles from ship on land?

What about those UHF frequencies in other countries? Are they permitted only aboard ship? Do other countries look the other way?
 

JASII

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I am glad that you pointed that out. I did do an FCC search lat evening and saw a lot of licensees, but I didn't drill down to the part where it listed them as drive through frequencies. Thanks for pointing that out!



...I have never seen an FCC or IC license issued for those frequencies, outside of the Fast Food drive-thru's...
 
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