Maryland State Police End Use of Ten Codes

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ThePhotoGuy

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
2/1/2012


STARTING TODAY, COMMON LANGUAGE PROTOCOL WILL BE USED BY MARYLAND STATE POLICE


(Pikesville, MD)- Effective today, the Maryland State Police will abolish the use of the current ten code system and utilize the Common Language Protocol, also known as Plain Language.

Historically, ten codes were used to describe common phrases used by law enforcement. The codes were intended to shorten voice communication on the radio. But police departments, even those in neighboring districts, have developed different codes to communicate the scenarios they encounter. The Common Language Protocol is expected to improve communication and reduce confusion, especially during multi-jurisdictional incidents or anytime different agencies are required to communicate on the radio.

For example, under the new system, instead of using code 10-46 when talking with a dispatcher or another trooper, the trooper will simply say , “disabled vehicle”. An additional requirement will be the use of the standard phonetic alphabet when conducting radio communications. Starting today, Maryland State Police will use specific words in conjunction with letters to increase the clarity of radio communications. Examples include: A - Alpha; B - Bravo, C – Charlie.

The elimination of the ten code system and the adoption of the standard phonetic alphabet is consistent with Governor Martin O’Malley’s public safety initiative to implement the Maryland Statewide Communications Interoperability Program. “In Maryland, we are committed to building an effective and dependable communications system among all public safety partners,” said Governor O’Malley. “Eliminating the ten code system helps us remove barriers needed to protect Marylanders, and represents a vital step toward building an efficient statewide system of interoperable communications.”

By implementing the Common Language Protocol, Maryland State Police are following a national trend which became more prevalent after 9/11 when agencies had difficulty communicating because they used different codes or signals. Virginia State Police have been using the common language protocol since November 2006. The new guideline also meets the recommendations of the National Incident Management System (NIMS) Integration Center.

“Communications Interoperability is a necessary investment into the lives of those who work on a daily basis to keep Marylanders safe,” said Maryland State Police Superintendent Colonel Marcus L. Brown. “The transition to using the Common Language Protocol and the phonetic alphabet will allow for the most efficient and highest level of immediate communication between state agencies and local jurisdictions.”



Maryland State Police Press Release
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