Medevac 2 , Non-Inj Accident

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jimmnn

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From: The Concern Network

Date: 11/9/09 17:50

Program: North Colorado Med Evac 2

Type: Bell 407
Tail #: N912GX
Operator/Vendor: Med-Trans Corp

Weather: Clear. Not a factor

Team: No injuries reported. Patient on board.

Description:
North Colorado Med Evac 2 was on a patient transport from Yuma, CO, en
route to Denver, CO. At approximately 1750 hours, the aircraft was
westbound at approximately 1200 feet AGL when the medical crew heard
an unusual whining noise emanating from the engine area and
immediately notified the pilot. The pilot, in consultation with the
medical crew, made a decision to make a Precautionary Landing (PL) and
initiated a descent. After initial reduction of the collective, the
engine chip light illuminated and the crew selected an appropriate PL
site in a field adjacent to a road.

The pilot executed a descending 90 degree turn into the wind and set
up for a final approach into the selected landing area. During the
descent, the pilot instructed the medical crewmembers to activate the
ISAT emergency switch on the satellite phone and to contact Dispatch
and advise them of the situation.

While on short final, at approximately 10 feet above the intended
landing point, the crew saw a flash and the engine failed. The engine
failure was accompanied by a yaw and the associated aircraft
warning/segment lights and audio alarms. The pilot executed an
autorotation to the intended landing point with no damage to the
aircraft or injury to the patient or medical crewmembers.

The patient was transported by another helicopter service and the
pilot and medical crewmembers were transported by aircraft back to
their home base. The FAA and NTSB were notified. The Denver Accident
Investigation Supervisor conducted an on-site investigation and
released the undamaged aircraft. The aircraft was subsequently
recovered to an MTC facility and is being evaluated in conjunction
with the OEM regarding the cause of the engine failure.

The immediate and decisive action on the part of the pilot and medical
crewmembers, the application of sound CRM practices/principles, and
application of hands-on emergency procedures training played an
integral role in the safe outcome of this occurrence.


Additional Info:
Additional information will be provided pending the results of an
internal investigation.

Source: Larry Bugg, VP Flight Operations & Safety Med-Trans Corp.
 

datainmotion

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Sounds like the pilot and crew made good decisions, considering the situation at hand, resulting in the best outcome.

Lets hope this info gets out since the media sticks to their "if it bleeds, it leads" formula and eternal "arm-chair quarterbacking" of air-ambulance accidents, which in this industry, inevitably results in "black-eyes" for flight crews everywhere.
 

n0doz

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I was on a ride with a Phoenix PD air unit a few years ago when the chip light lit. We were on the ground in a shopping mall parking lot in less than 30 seconds. Not even enough time to get scared (although sitting in the back seat of a Hughes 500 with the doors removed is not exactly fear-free.)
GREAT job, Med-Trans pilot!!!
 

abqscan

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metal in the oil is no bueno! BIG kudos to the pilot!!!!!
 
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Lets not forget the good heads up by the crew to actually hear something wrong and alert the pilot BEFORE the chip light came on...
 
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