Mexico the “New” China?

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mikepdx

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When it comes to global manufacturing, Mexico is quickly emerging as the “new” China.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest
country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2,
followed by China and then Brazil.

In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there
to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

Is Mexico the "New" China?

[size=+1]Mexico's a whole lot closer to Bentonville, Arkansas than China is...[/size]
 
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N_Jay

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And "Japan" was the old China.

EDIT:
Actually Mexico was the old China, and Japan was the old Mexico, and India was the old Japan for some products,
AND GUESS WHAT?????

We are still the US.

Time for all the fear mongers to study some economic history.

There are a few important lessons hidden among the facts.
 
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RayAir

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When it comes to global manufacturing, Mexico is quickly emerging as the “new” China.

According to corporate consultant AlixPartners, Mexico has leapfrogged China to be ranked as the cheapest
country in the world for companies looking to manufacture products for the U.S. market. India is now No. 2,
followed by China and then Brazil.

In fact, Mexico’s cost advantages and has become so cheap that even Chinese companies are moving there
to capitalize on the trade advantages that come from geographic proximity.

Is Mexico the "New" China?

[size=+1]Mexico's a whole lot closer to Bentonville, Arkansas than China is...[/size]
In Mexico manufacturing plants are set up inside what they call "maquiladoras" or industrial parks. There are already hundreds of these parks strung along the U.S -Mexico border from Tijuana to Reynosa. Factories located in these industrial parks can import parts and supplies to the U.S DUTY-FREE. Workers here typically earn $0.75 - $2.00/hr.

Plants that are not located in the industrial parks must pay costly import duties and deal with bureaucratic red tape at the border.
 

kb2vxa

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There's nothing new about it, consumer goods have been stamped "Made in Mexico" for many years, even the cars you drive. It's only taken the media this long to discover it and where have YOU been? Oh I know, nobody reads the labels.

"Time for all the fear mongers to study some economic history."
A little more than that actually, otherwise the countries of origin would be in proper order. You forgot to put our Southern States after Japan and before China, where do you think the jobs are and why are Northerners migrating south? Oh and don't forget cost of living and taxes, I'm sure you like wrangling over minor complications. (;->)

Here's a question just to toss a spanner in the gearbox; why is Australia suffering from migration overload? Here's another just to get your panties in a bunch: why does the US import so few Australian goods? One more to put the cherry on top; why are US based corporations like the familiar GM and Ford doing so well there while failing here?

Inquiring minds want to know but don't expect me to get embroiled, once I read the paper it goes in the bottom of the bird cage. (;->)
 
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