Missouri State Patrol in Richmond

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lanbergld

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I'm in downtown Richmond (Virginia). Last night I was tuning around VHF-Low on my Icom IC-R75. I only use an indoor random wire antenna. I was getting rural-type police calls on 42.86 kHz, pretty strong, like S-8. I got a call sign. Looked it up this morning on the FCC database, it belongs to Missouri State Patrol (KAA202),

I was also getting rural-type calls, involving deers an such things, on 42.50 and 42.52. God knows where they were coming from. I didn't get call signs for those. I dont think they were emanating from Virginia either.

I've heard of VHF skip, but this is beyond my wildest dreams.


Larry
 

gcgrotz

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Years ago I was working with a low band paging system on 43 MHz and certain times of the year our monitor receiver would hear a system in Tampa just about every day. When Charlottesville had fire on 46.46 with a receiver on Carter's Mt you could monitor the UHF downlink and frequently hear Orange County CA on it. That was back in the early 80's. When the next sunspot cycle peaked, OC wasn't on low band anymore.

The trick is to be monitoring when the band opens. Do a google search for E-skip. Good catch!
 

lanbergld

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Thanks - yes I was surprised. I went to bed thinking, 'I'll look that call sign up in the morning', figuring it was maybe Caroline County or somewhere on the far outskirts of Richmond. I was shocked when I found it was Missouri.

One of the reasons I like the Icom IC-R75 is that it has VHF-low band, as well as going down to LF. People say, 'Bah, VHF-low, there's nothing on that band. Why did Icom choose it?' Well this is exactly why I like to comb through it.


Larry
 

EZlistener

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42.50 (NCSHP F9) and 42.52 (NCSHP F3) are well known North Carolina SHP freqs. Most often received with 173.8 CTCSS. 42.86 is NCSHP F11 as well as Alcohol Law Enforcement. Based on your location, I would suspect these rather than Missouri.
Try to listen for georgraphic information that may identify your receptions.
 

VE3RADIO

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I get MO and NC from my locale in Toronto Canada so VA is not out of the question. MO is a regular around these parts.
 

lanbergld

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The 42.86 I confirmed as Missouri Highway Patrol but, yeah the 42.50 and 42.52 remain a mystery. Going by accent I thought it was somewhere here in Virginia, originally, but as you know there's no frequency matches anywhere in the state. They were police calls, something about a deer in the road. Also some guy with an Iowa address got pulled over.

Anyway I became excited with my suprise simply because I'd never before gotten that range of Dx on VHF. On VHF I usually look for several counties away, not states.


Larry
 

ka4gfy

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There have been quite a few band openings on 6 meters (50 MHz) recently, as well as occasionally on 2 meters (144 MHz), so that doesn't surprise me. Its sporadic-E propogation, common in the summertime.

It makes for great listening.

73, Rich, KA4GFY
 

freqhopping

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I received several different Missouri Highway Patrol frequencies in the past. At the same time I would also get Oklahoma and Mississippi HPs.
 

reconrider8

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what kinda antennas do you guys use and what hight are yall running them to pick up that lowband stuff i know the original poster said a wire
 

Freq_n_Hertz

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I've "routinely" logged Missouri and Nebraska highway patrol from upstate NY. Those states seem to have a "pipeline" into the area, mostly in May and June but have received them in Dec & Jan. as well.

Those agencies are good at regularly stating their call sign so it makes it easy to identify/confirm them (if you can understand what they're saying - they spit it out rapid fire).

Sporadic-E propagation can send a signal a long way - I've heard CHP in Los Angeles, CA :)
 

Freq_n_Hertz

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antenna

what kinda antennas do you guys use and what hight are yall running them to pick up that lowband stuff i know the original poster said a wire

I use Antennacraft ST2 on the roof about 27' up. The signal level can come booming in at 4 out of 5 bars so you don't really need a big antenna.
 

reconrider8

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im just about to get my tower up just have to get 2 grounding blocks and some more small parts first then its going up thats why i was asking i have sputnik and an 800 mhz omni going up thats why i was asking
 

lanbergld

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I've "routinely" logged Missouri and Nebraska highway patrol from upstate NY. Those states seem to have a "pipeline" into the area, mostly in May and June but have received them in Dec & Jan. as well.

Those agencies are good at regularly stating their call sign so it makes it easy to identify/confirm them (if you can understand what they're saying - they spit it out rapid fire).

Sporadic-E propagation can send a signal a long way - I've heard CHP in Los Angeles, CA :)

Well that should make VHF-low band Dx'ing even more appealing. Since my original post I haven't again received the Missouri Highway Patrol, but I have got Pennsylvania (Adams County, Gettysburg area). Again I'm in eastern Virginia. Plus a bunch of UNIDs, sherrifs departments, utilities, so on, that aren't local to me. Unfortunately I don't always get an FCC call sign by which I can identify.

I haven't tried any of this on my scanner, only my Icom IC-R75. I use 48 ft. of insulated wire that's wrapped around my window - twice - and I use the window's metal frame as a counterpoise/ground. Its the best I've found I can do. It works.


Larry
 
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Welcome to low band! Contrary to what the big businesses say, it's alive and well, and works pretty well - and you don't need a big antenna for DX there!

Missouri State Highway Patrol uses 42 MHz extensively. Some of their locations have very high effective radiated powers, tens of thousands of watts. Low band works very nicely in Missouri and follows the hills just fine. They use Daniels base stations with some custom made broadcast radio amplifiers and Kenwood mobile radios (with Pyramid mobile repeaters with high band portable radios). The antennas are up fairly high and are usually multi-bay collinear folded dipoles.

It's not uncommon for the MSHP Communications guys to get reception reports from Europe when the maximum usable frequency goes high enough. A lot of hams use them as an indicator that 6 meters is going to open up. Check the RR database for a listing of who is where. Enjoy it, because the state is working on a VHF high band trunked radio system and everything will eventually end up there.
 

gcgrotz

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I see the FCC license shows a site at Lees Summit with 5000 watts ERP. and it is close to Kansas City. I bet they trashed a lot of TVs back in the analog days! Most of the other sites are a more reasonable 100-300 watts. I don't think there would be any reason for "tens of kilowatts" on VHF low, the mobiles would hear the base and never be able to get back unless they have a LOT of remote receiver locations.

Thanks for the info Hal in Mo! Awesome to think about. Most agencies around here abandoned Lowband even though it worked well in the mountains here.
 
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mancow

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The high power levels allow them to roll the signal over the varying terrain of Missouri and it works well. The reason they can "get back" from the mobiles is the use of remote receivers. The audio is back hauled over various Vhf and Uhf links to dispatch.
 
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