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Mobile Radio Power Question

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rescue69

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I have a wall plug adapter that is AC/DC so for monitoring purposes only I have a FT 8900 that I want to only listen on in the house could I power it this way? I will not be transmitting at all. Any insights would be great!!!

Rick
 

popnokick

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Yaesu's spec says it only draws .5A on receive (squelched). If you're going to use an AC wall wart for the DC voltage, you should probably plan for at least a 750ma current draw to account for unsquelched operation, illumination, etc. And you'll need to be careful with the polarity of the connection to the radio. Making a mistake may let out all the factory-installed smoke.
 

KK4JUG

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The wall wart becomes a very important component so be absolutely sure you get a quality one lest you get that puff of smoke and a whiff of ozone that transforms the radio into a door stop.
 

brndnstffrd

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Not what you are asking but Motorola had some laptop charger-esq style power supplies for their radios that are available cheaply on ebay. These would be preferable since they are real commercial grade communications power supplies so they should be relatively quiet as far as RF goes and you wouldnt have to worry about questionable quality. You would need to change the plug on either the supply or your radio to match but this would do what you want, and give you the ability to transmit in the future if you decide to. In my opinion it's not worth gambling a couple hundred dollar radio to save $20 on a decent power supply.
 

WB9YBM

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I have a wall plug adapter that is AC/DC so for monitoring purposes only I have a FT 8900 that I want to only listen on in the house could I power it this way? I will not be transmitting at all. Any insights would be great!!!

Rick
I've had the situation where the "wall-warts" have been either poorly regulated or have inadequate filtering (or both). It's pretty much "pot luck" so they're not something I'd recommend unless you're willing/able to check the quality of the output (both under load & no load) and don't mind a bit of tinkering to get a good output. If you've got the room for a "normal"-sized supply, the brand I've had the best luck with is Astron...
 

bharvey2

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I have used laptop sized 12VDC power supplies to power mobile radio in some circumstances. Usually for testing (no transmitting though) and programming) If you have one that can deliver a adequate current while maintaining 12-13VDC and is well filtered, it should be okay for your application.
 

jaspence

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I use a laptop size power supply to run a 20 watt base on 2 meters and 440, both transmit and receive. It has worked well for at least two years with three different radios, including a Yaesu FT-90R.
 

K4RBT

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Make sure of the output voltage on laptop power bricks. Panasonic and IBM are 18 volts. Makes it hard to run my CF-18 in my truck, need an expensive up converter.
 

jaspence

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This is not a laptop power supply. It is rated at 13.8 volts and has good filtering. I have done computer repair for 40 years and have a computer that runs off a 5V 3A usb power supply. The newest processors and other components have made major changes in power requirements. My newest HT has a 7.4V battery that can be charged from a standard usb port.
 

WB9YBM

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I've seen even good power supplies act squirrely when there's RF around, especially when they're under load so it may not be a question of how good a supply is (well, a small part of the question), but how bullet-proof is it with RF around?
 
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