Most selective handheld wideband scanner?

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TassieJay

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Hello everyone,
I'm wondering about what is considered to be the most selective handheld wideband scanner?

Part of my job is to identify & locate interference. I have access to an ancient and heavy (80 lbs) spectrum analyzer which isn't very practical for portable work, and my employer can't afford one of the new lightweight portable types. In any case, I've found it easier and quicker to identify and locate the interference with a wideband scanner in 90% of cases. But I'm sick of using my privately owned AR5000 for this duty, and want to explore other - handheld - options.

Since the scanner will be used in a demanding RF environment, I'll need something that is good in handling strong signals and is selective. My other requirements are that it must receive up to 960 MHz, but up to 1965 MHz would be a bonus; and be able to independently select AM / FM / WFM on any frequency. A secondary requirement is that the S-meter response time be *fast*.

Shortlist that I can think of: AR8000, AR8200, Yupiteru MVT9000, Icom R20. Any others to add to the list?So of these which do you think handles strong signals best and is most selective?
 

teufler

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aor 8000 was what I used, in the car when I was looking for transmitter interference as an OOC . I used it also when walking. Had an Optiscount for close in, usually 5oo feet, the Optiscount would lokck onto a signal. But the aor 8000 was an all mode receiver. The Optiscount was by far the quickest reading, though the aor 8000, you could tune out to 5 places and it was pretty selective. For really overpowering signals, a step attenuator kept everything in order.
 

aggie72

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Have you thought of SDR? With an Up-Converter and SDR dongle you could cover from 100KHz up to almost 2 GHz depending on the chip. You would need a laptop but you get the benefit of a spectrum analyzer and water-fall display along with tons of options depending on the software. I like SDR# personally but there are many options out there. The biggest issue would be switching antennas depending on your spectrum of interest. Here's some good reading.
 
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