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Motorola DTR700 Portable Digital Radio 900Mhz

gman1971

Member
Joined
Apr 4, 2020
Messages
120
Very nice, thank you for sharing your experiences. I am eyeing these radios as well myself. Even if I have an entire fleet of XPR (U/V only) and SL radios, I guess one can never have enough radios, right...? I think its a common disease found in forums like this one :D LOLOL.... (sarcastic)

The range comparison is quite good, indeed. One possible explanation is that different materials have different transparency index to the wavelength going through it; like heat vs visible light, for example, common glass is opaque to heat, wavelength ~13 microns, but its perfectly transparent to 0.45 micron wavelength (visible green light) , and the same is true, germanium is opaque to visible light, but is crystal clear to 13 micron heat... so my guess is that at the frequencies being used, the things are more transparent than at 460 mhz.

G.
 

kv5e

0xD8 0x84 0x07
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Dec 19, 2002
Messages
187
Location
127.0.0.1
900 MHz gets through cracks and small openings and reflects well. That's why Part 90, Part 22, and Part 24 paging/data messaging in the 929-932 and 940-941 MHz works well. Antennas are small enough to get high gain and simulcast works well with proper engineering.

The /\/\ Part 15 900 MHz devices work well in large ships and buildings because of these propagation characteristics.

I have a fleet of them and they work well as long as you understand the limitations of 1 watt at these frequencies.
 

n1das

Member
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 17, 2003
Messages
1,597
Location
Nashua, NH
Very nice, thank you for sharing your experiences. I am eyeing these radios as well myself. Even if I have an entire fleet of XPR (U/V only) and SL radios, I guess one can never have enough radios, right...? I think its a common disease found in forums like this one :D LOLOL.... (sarcastic)
LOL, having too many radios is almost enough. LOL. :D

I sold my DLR1060 fleet to a friend for his business after I got my DTR700 fleet. At first he wasn't sure what he was going to use them for except maybe as rental radios for his customers. Now he and his employees use them ALL the time around the office and at job sites. Family uses them too.

I had to sell some radios given that I also have a fleet of DTR650 radios. I had them all working with each other on public and private groups. I also had the DLR and DTR700 fleets also working with each other on Profile ID mode channels with the PIN feature. The legacy DTRs don't have the PIN feature but still use the same underlying FHSS system.

My wife got p!$$ed at me for selling the DLR fleet because they are so convenient and so small and insanely easy to use. LOL. It's OK because she loves using the DTRs too. :) She's not a licensed ham but fully gets it when it comes to having local on-site radio communications to use. Now to work on the ham license part.... :)

900 MHz gets through cracks and small openings and reflects well. That's why Part 90, Part 22, and Part 24 paging/data messaging in the 929-932 and 940-941 MHz works well. Antennas are small enough to get high gain and simulcast works well with proper engineering.

The /\/\ Part 15 900 MHz devices work well in large ships and buildings because of these propagation characteristics.

I have a fleet of them and they work well as long as you understand the limitations of 1 watt at these frequencies.
Agree 100% and I never got the DTRs and DLRs to set any range records however they never cease to amaze. The DTR and DLR radios were specifically designed to work where small businesses are located, and that's inside buildings.

People who have used the DTRs and DLRs aboard cruise ships report having full ship coverage on all decks compared to a pair of 4W UHF Part 90/95 commercial radios on GMRS simplex which had difficulty penetrating more than 1 or 2 decks. Like buildings, the ship is more "open" at 900MHz compared to 460MHz or 150MHz. When deep inside the ship, you are essentially inside a compartmentalized metal enclosure and many reflections are present. The reflections and the FHSS operation actually helps the coverage. The individual hot spots and dead spots also hop around as the frequency hops. The FHSS operation effectively stirs the modes so to speak.

These are amazing radios.
 

nostolgiaforinfinity

Newbie
Premium Subscriber
Joined
Feb 15, 2019
Messages
1
has anyone tried connecting an external antenna to the U FL connector on the DTR700 board instead of using the antenna stud connection? That's assuming the U FL connector actually works for an antenna and isn't just there for testing purposes. I've been doing a bit of research on trying to connect an external antenna to the DTR700, and so far this is the only idea I was able to come up with aside from a sketchy chinese connector here: Rf Coaxial N Female Back Bulkhead Connector With Extended 12.5mm M4 Thread Pin - Buy N Connector Female,N Female Bulkhead M4,N Coaxial Connector Product on Alibaba.com
This the the correct threading (M4) but would need to be cut down. Grounding would also be an issue from what I understand.
 

rescue161

KE4FHH
Database Admin
Joined
Jun 5, 2002
Messages
3,364
Location
Hubert, NC
I just got two of each type of these radios and can add to the mystery of why the DTR550/650 suffer in range when using an external antenna. The SMA on my DTR650's have an unusually low male pin, so if your female SMA has a recessed female terminal, it is more than likely not making full contact. I measured the SMA on my DTR650's and here are the results.

From outer shell to the inside base, the depth of that measurement is 0.215" and the center pin measures 0.070" from the bottom. I have several adapters for testing and most of them are recessed around ~0.060", so the center pin is only making it into the female terminal about ~0.010" and add to that that the pin is tapered, so it is more than likely making a very poor connection, if it's making contact at all. The original antenna and the longer 900 MHz whip both have female terminals that extend all the way to the end of the SMA connector. I would bet that if you filed down the female connector the bring the terminal closer to the end, that it would make better contact and therefore give better performance.
 
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