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Motorola Radio

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echo4929

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Feb 22, 2007
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Hi, I am in the process of getting my Tech HAM Radio License. I have just bought the book and plan to take the test as soon as I can. I am interested in purchasing a MOTOROLA HTS2000 so I can use it as a VHF scanner and a HAM radio.
Just a few questions:

1. Is the motorola HTS2000 a good HAM radio?
2. Will the VHF Motorola HTS2000 let me use all the HAM channels I am allowed to?
3. With a TECH license...can I talk to people in my area? state? nation-wide?
4. The radio I am interested in purchasing, has this "FLASHPORT" or something like that...what is that? Do I need it?

If the HTS2000 isnt a good HAM radio...can anyone reccomend a good VHF scanner that has HAM radio captabilities? Thanks!
 

mlconnell

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Never heard of the HTS-2000.. internet does not show any hits on that model of Motorola. I used to use HT-1000 for my handheld HAM Radios. I had a UHF and VHF model as they don't make a dual bander. You can program them to 380-512Mhz and 136-174Mhz in the software with a few trick keystrokes. They are solid radios however I think the YAESU FT-60R that I have now is a great HAM Radio that has extended receive all the way up to 999 Mhz. It will pick up conventional channels as I listen to sheriff and other city police that use conventional freq's with it as well as the local police that use 800 Mhz. But cannot follow them because the FT-60R does not do trunking. The audio quality of the FT-60R is awesome and it TX power at a full 5 Watts rocks for local repeaters.

FT-60R will let you TX 2 meter 144-148 Mhz HAM Band and
70 Centimeter HAM Band 420-440Mhz.

You can receive the 220 Mhz band but not transmit.

It will not receive or tx on the 10 Meter band which will be in your priveledges. (29 Mhz area) right next to the 11 Meter CB Band 26-27Mhz.

the .33 centimeter band in the 900 Mhz range will be received but not TX. I think it's around 933Mhz range but not sure. Not used much I think.

Good luck on your test and getting your license and welcome to the hobby. I hope I'm not too scattered brained on this message. Help me out here guys !! :)

TO RECAP

1. Is the motorola HTS2000 a good HAM radio?
Dont know it.

2. Will the VHF Motorola HTS2000 let me use all the HAM channels I am allowed to?
NO

3. With a TECH license...can I talk to people in my area? state? nation-wide?
Local with repeaters. All 3 with internet links and Linked repeater systems.

4. The radio I am interested in purchasing, has this "FLASHPORT" or something like that...what is that? Do I need it?

NOT SURE WHAT IT IS.
 
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scanfan03

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I think the OP means an MTS 2000, because he/she mentioned the flashport. Since it sounds like you are new to the hobby, I would say that the MTS 2000 is not a good radio for you. I say it is not good for you because:

1. It is not a dualband nor does it have wide band receive. and
2. Very hard to program.

If I was you, I would get a Dualband HAM handheld like the poster above said and mod it for wide band receive (most you can mod fairly easily). Just search google for 5 watt Dualband handheld and you should come up with a bunch of hits with radio models which would be fairly good for you.
 

echo4929

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Okay...besides the Yaesu FT60R...are there any good motorola HAM radios that do the VHF band and the UHF band?

If im not confused, if I want to have all the frequencies that I can talk on with my Tech. License, I need a UHF + VHF radio, right?

If I could get a Motorola MTS2000 VHF programmed, would it still be bad? Is having a radio that can only work on the VHF band bad for a HAM operator?

Also, I read that some phones have a "Phone Patch" capability...what is that? How does it work?

Thanks everyone
 

mlconnell

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They don't have Motorola's that do VHF/UHF that will work for your use. Those are primarily business radios and you need RIB Boxes, etc to program with. Very complicated to begin with. The FT-60R does VHF/UHF and wideband receive all without any modification. You can modify it to do EXTENDED Transmit but not necessary for strictly HAM USE. An autopatch is basically a phone line that is available on the repeater and you access it with a code you punch in after holding the PTT (Push to talk) switch on your ham radio. Normally you can join a repeater association for around $25.00-$30.00 a year and you get the code to the patch etc. You don't want a Motorola Radio because it will be way to advanced for you and even if you get it programmed, how are you going to change the programming, or learn how to program? Get a HAM Radio for starters. Even that is going to be difficult until you learn how to program it... etc Offsets, PL Codes... and the likes.
All your priveledges with the TECH License you are not going to find on one beginner radio.

73

KC5VVL
Mike Connell
 

RodStrong

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Nov 11, 2007
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mlconnell said:
Those are primarily business radios and you need RIB Boxes, etc to program with. You don't want a Motorola Radio because it will be way to advanced for you and even if you get it programmed, how are you going to change the programming, or learn how to program?
There's a few Moto portables that are field programmable, although they are not the norm.
 

SCPD

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Feb 24, 2001
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Virginia
First ham radio

echo4929 said:
Hi, I am in the process of getting my Tech HAM Radio License. I have just bought the book and plan to take the test as soon as I can. I am interested in purchasing a MOTOROLA HTS2000 so I can use it as a VHF scanner and a HAM radio.
Just a few questions:

1. Is the motorola HTS2000 a good HAM radio?
2. Will the VHF Motorola HTS2000 let me use all the HAM channels I am allowed to?
3. With a TECH license...can I talk to people in my area? state? nation-wide?
4. The radio I am interested in purchasing, has this "FLASHPORT" or something like that...what is that? Do I need it?

If the HTS2000 isnt a good HAM radio...can anyone reccomend a good VHF scanner that has HAM radio captabilities? Thanks!
Like others have said, forget about a radio on the ham bands that is not front panel programmable.
You may not need a dual bander, about 95% of repeater activity (around me anyway) is on 2-meters. Find out from who you plan to take the test from what the active ham repeaters in your area are.

And I'd like to suggest that your first handheld radio be one with a BNC antenna connector. This gives you three radios in one, since you can run coax and antenna at the house, and make a base out of it. And you put an antenna on your car and make a mobile radio out of it. I say BNC because SMA connectors will become intermittent if you keep plugging and unplugging them.
 

n8emr

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Oct 20, 2005
Messages
495
echo4929 said:
Hi, I am in the process of getting my Tech HAM Radio License. I have just bought the book and plan to take the test as soon as I can. I am interested in purchasing a MOTOROLA HTS2000 so I can use it as a VHF scanner and a HAM radio.
Just a few questions:
Never heard of an HTS 2000, but even without knowing its specs I can say its NOT a good ham radio. Not that its not a good radio, but its not a good ham radio. Most motorola cant be front panel programmed and generally consumers cant get the motorola software so changing programming becomes an issue.

Also since your goal is ham and scanning, Just about every new ham radio has wide band receive and makes a decent scanner.
 

k4njk

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There are two primary reasons to use an MTS 2000 for ham use. You NEED a radio that is type accepted for use in the commercial frequency range and can be legally used in the ham bands. You prefer using a commercial grade radio because it is more rugged, has better audio and RF performance. You lose a considerable amount of flexibily to release these benefits. Morotola radios are single band. Typically, they must be programmed in advance with the frequencies, tones and offsets in advance and unless you have the necessary hardware/software/knowledge cannot be reprogrammed by the end user. Scanning is limited to a single bank of 15/16 channels. Multiple banks can be programmed, but only one bank can be scanned at a time. For a new ham looking transmit on multiple amateur bands and having wideband receive capabilities I would recommend looking to ham radios made by Icom, Kenwood or Yaesu. They all have experience in the commercial market as well. I like the Kenwood THF6A. It has a small size, excellent battery life and wideband receive including AM aircraft. Best of luck with the new hobby.
 

CAPTLPOL1

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Joined
Mar 19, 2003
Messages
248
If you want a single band unit, get a Motorola. If you want it to be field programable, buy a HT1550 with the special battery, XTS 2500 with the FPP flash, or XTS 5000 with the FPP flash. You can use the flash decoder available right here on RR.com. Make sure your XTS 2500 or XTS 5000 has at least the Q53 and/or the Q52 option. If it has the Q53 option then you will need the dongle to attach to the radio. If it has the Q52 option, you will not need a dongle.

The mods may want to move this to the Motorola section.
 

prcguy

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So Cal - Richardson, TX - Tewksbury, MA
If the OP has friends that can help with programming, software, programming cable, etc, then he can make use of the radio. Otherwise be prepared for the biggest frustration and let down in your ham radio life. Legitimately purchasing the software and everything to program the radio yourself will cost as much as the radio.
prcguy
CAPTLPOL1 said:
If you want a single band unit, get a Motorola. If you want it to be field programable, buy a HT1550 with the special battery, XTS 2500 with the FPP flash, or XTS 5000 with the FPP flash. You can use the flash decoder available right here on RR.com. Make sure your XTS 2500 or XTS 5000 has at least the Q53 and/or the Q52 option. If it has the Q53 option then you will need the dongle to attach to the radio. If it has the Q52 option, you will not need a dongle.

The mods may want to move this to the Motorola section.
 

scanfan03

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Jun 2, 2003
Messages
1,653
Location
Houston, Texas
echo4929 said:
Okay...besides the Yaesu FT60R...are there any good motorola HAM radios that do the VHF band and the UHF band?

If im not confused, if I want to have all the frequencies that I can talk on with my Tech. License, I need a UHF + VHF radio, right?

If I could get a Motorola MTS2000 VHF programmed, would it still be bad? Is having a radio that can only work on the VHF band bad for a HAM operator?

Also, I read that some phones have a "Phone Patch" capability...what is that? How does it work?

Thanks everyone
A dualband is better because obviously if there are repeaters on either band you will be able to talk on them with the same radio. MTS 2000 already programmed would still be bad for a beginner because what if a new repeater comes up or you become a part of skywarn and have to reprogram the radio? There's $50 down the drain to a radio shop for programming. Having a 2M only radio isn't bad per say for a HAM operator if there aren't any 440 repeaters in their area. Depending on where you live there could be 144 and 440 repeaters and you want to be able to use your new shiny radio to the fullest.
 

CAPTLPOL1

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Messages
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You could buy the programming software from Motorola, the cables and the interface RIB and superior radio than some hammie do it all with no front end radio.
 

N2MWE

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People's Republic of New York
I have several Motorola radios I use for ham. I have an MTS2000 for VHF 2 meter, and an MTX838 for 70 cm. For digital, I have two Astro Sabers, one UHF and one VHF. Yes, they are a pain to get programmed, but...drop a hammy portable and drop a Motorola...see which one survives the fall....
 

zz0468

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God, I hate the term "hammy". I wince every time I see it used. Anyway, to answer some of the OP's questions...

echo4929 said:
Hi, I am in the process of getting my Tech HAM Radio License. I have just bought the book and plan to take the test as soon as I can. I am interested in purchasing a MOTOROLA HTS2000 so I can use it as a VHF scanner and a HAM radio.
Just a few questions:
I think you are infatuated with the idea of a motorola radio. They make poor scanners, even though they have superior performance. Wanna listen to just a few conventional channels? Sure, they work fine. But as a scanner, you would do better with a scanner. Really.

echo4929 said:
1. Is the motorola HTS2000 a good HAM radio?
As previously stated, there's no such thing. The MTS2000 is expensive, hard to program, and has features more oriented to public safety than amateur radio. But if you just talk on a few channels, don't mind the expense and can actually get it programmed, and change the programming as needed when you want to, sure... they're ok ham radios.[/quote]

echo4929 said:
2. Will the VHF Motorola HTS2000 let me use all the HAM channels I am allowed to?
Not by a long shot. As a technician, you'll have cw privileges on some HF bands, phone on 10 meters, and full privileges on 6 meters, 2 meters, 223, 70 cm, 900 MHz, 1200 MHz, 2.3 GHz, and a number of other microwave bands. The MTS2000 will do 2 meters OR 70 cm. Pick ONE.

There is no one radio that will allow you to use all your technician privileges. Radios that will allow you to use much of your technician privileges will cost you around $1500-2000 or more. If you really want it ALL, including the microwave bands, you're in the tens of thousands of dollars. One radio at a time... =)

echo4929 said:
3. With a TECH license...can I talk to people in my area? state? nation-wide?
Yes, yes, and yes. The further you talk, the more you'll need propagation enhancements and better equipment.

echo4929 said:
4. The radio I am interested in purchasing, has this "FLASHPORT" or something like that...what is that? Do I need it?
Flashport is a Motorola trade name for upgradable, programmable features. No, you don't NEED it. Some Motorola radios use it, some don't. You're better off with a radio that doesn't use it.

echo4929 said:
If the HTS2000 isnt a good HAM radio...can anyone reccomend a good VHF scanner that has HAM radio captabilities? Thanks!
You need to find a ham radio with scanning capabilities, not the other way around. Ham radios have marginal "scanning" capabilities, and even receiver performance is frequently "not guaranteed" outside of the ham bands. You're really better getting a ham radio AND a scanner.
 
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mlconnell

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zz0468 said:
God, I hate the term "hammy". I wince every time I see it used. Anyway, to answer some of the OP's questions...


I think you are infatuated with the idea of a motorola radio. They make poor scanners, even though they yave superior performance. Wanna listen to just a few conventional channels? Sure, they work fine. But as a scanner, you would do better with a scanner. Really.


As previously stated, there's no such thing. The MTS2000 is expensive, hard to program, and has features more oriented to public safety than amateur radio. But if you just talk on a few channels, don't mind the expense and can actually get it programmed, and change the programming as needed when you ant to, sure. They're ok ham radios.

Not by a long shot. As a technician, you'll have cw privileges on some HF bands, phone on 10 meters, and full privileges on 6 meters, 2 meters, 223, 70 cm, 900 MHz, 1200 MHz, 2.3 GHz, and a number of other microwave bands. The MTS2000 will do 2 meters OR 70 cm. Pick ONE.

There is no one radio that will allow you to use all your technician privileges. Radios that will allow you to use much of your technician privileges will cost you around $1500-2000 or more. If you really want it ALL, including the microwave bands, you're in the tens of thousands of dollars. One radio at a time... =)


Yes, yes, and yes. The further you talk, the more you'll need propagation enhancements and better equipment.


Flashport is a Motorola trade name for upgradable, programmable features. No, you don't NEED it. Some Motorola radios use it, some don't. You're better off with a radio that doesn't use it.


You need to find a ham radio with scanning capabilities, not the other way around. Ham radios have marginal "scanning" capabilities, and even receiver performance is frequently "not guaranteed" outside of the ham bands. You're really better getting a ham radio AND a scanner.[/QUOTE]

I would have to say that the Yaesu FT-60R is a great wide band receiver as it is optimal in all bands as I have been able to experience. I had some ICOMS that were not in the past however I am sure that other HAM radios are also. I've have a few Motorola's, rib box, software etc and had to use the software to enable the field program option. I love the Motorola's as they are very rugged and the sound quality is awesome. The HT-1000 makes a great VHF or UHF version of a HAM Radio however NOT FOR A BEGINNER.
Start with a HAM radio as I am sure most of us had. You can always buy a Motorola later once you understand more about radios and programming.
 

Chris-KH2PM

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Th-f6a

I highly recommend the Kenwood TH-F6A. It's light, has a wide coverage receiver, excellent battery life and a sturdy case. Of all the HT's I have owned over the years, most of which I still have, it's my overall favorite and the one that goes with me when I need to take an HT.

http://www.kenwoodusa.com/Communications/Amateur_Radio/Portables/TH-F6A

http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=kenwood+TH-F6A&btnG=Google+Search

Motorola's are great, don't get me wrong. I am looking for either an XTS 2500, 3000 or 5000 P25 capable in VHF and UHF but the prices of used ones vary so much (depending on options, such as FPP, or 'front panel programmable') and P25.

Also consider the EF Johnson 5100's. I have both VHF and UHF versions that are analog and P25. Very durable (ie, HEAVY..compared to the TH-F6A!). I call 'em my 'Big Johnsons'. Hehe. Check EBAY for Johnson 5100 and Motorola XTS.
 

whls3

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Yes, Moto is tough. But...

Yaesu FT60 $189.00
Programming software $35.00
Drop it and have to replace it TWICE, and you still have spent less than a new Moto!
 
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